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[l/m 6/5/2002] C. Fletcher/R. Carson /Eco-warriors Distilled Wisdom (8/28) XYZ

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Panel 8

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
If you are just beginning activities like hiking, perhaps some of the best
books written on the subject are those by Colin Fletcher.  He has tried to
keep his editions current with trends such as equipment, but his spirit
comes through in books like The Complete Walker (his beginner guide)
and The Thousand Mile Summer (walking the length of California
12 years before it came popular).

Excerpts from The Complete Walker:

There is a cardinal rule of travel, all too often overlooked,
that I call "The Law of Inverse Appreciation."

	It states: "The less there is between you and the environment, the
more you appreciate the environment."

	Every walker knows, even if he has not thought about it, the law's
most obvious application: the bigger and most efficient your means of
travel, the further you become divorced from the reality through which
you are travelling.  A man learns a thousand times more about the sea from
the "Kon Tiki" than from the "Queen Mary;" euphorically more about space
at the end of a cord than inside a capsule.  On land, you remain closer
in touch with the countryside in a slow moving old open touring 
car than in a modern, air-conditioned, tinted-glass-window,
80-miles-per-hour-and-never-notice-it behemoth.  And you come closer
in touch on a horse than any car; in closer touch on foot than on any horse.

	But the law has a second and less obvious application:
your appreciation varies not only according to what you travel "in"
but also according to what you travel "over."  Drive along a 
freeway in any kind of car and you are in almost zero contact with the 
country beyond the concrete.  Turn off onto a minor highway and you are
a notch closer.  A narrow country road is better still.  
When you bump slowly along a jeep trail you begin at last to sense those 
vital details that turn mere landscape into living countryside.  And not
long ago, on the East African savanna -- where it was at 
the time not considered destructive to drive cross-country over the pale 
grasslands -- I discovered an extending corollary to my law:
"The further you move away from any impediment of appreciation,
the better it is."

	It is less obvious that these same discrepancies persist when you are 
travelling on foot.  Any blacktop road holds the scrollwork of the country
at arm's length: the road itself keeps stalking along on stilts or
grubbing about in a trough, and your feet travel on harsh and
sterile pavement.  Turn off onto a dusty jeep trail and the detail moves
closer.  A foot trail is better still.  But you do not really 
have to break free until you step off the trail and walk through waving 
grass or woodland growth or across rock or smooth sand or (most perfect
of all) virgin snow.  Now you can read all the details, 
down to the print.  Drifting snow crystals barely begun to blurr the four 
footed signature of the marten that padded past this lodgepole pine.
Or a long-legged lizard scurries for cover, kicking up 
little spurts of sand as it corners around a bush. . .And always, in snow 
or sand or rock or seascape grass there is, as far as you can see in
any direction, no sign of man.
	That, I believe, is being in touch with the world.

--Colin Fletcher

"Technology gets in the way."
			--Don Norman, Apple Fellow, UCSD Professor Emer.
	"Defending Human Attributes in the Age of the Machine,"
	Voyager First Person Books-on-CD series
	See "The All in One Knife" in
		'The Gallery of Undefinable Things'
		An Exhibit from the Collection of Jacques Carelman
	Fletcher would like this.

Back to Fletcher:

Other foot notes

* It would probably be a good thing if you reread this paragraph at least once
-- and tried to remember it later on.  This is essentially a "know-how"
book, but we must never lose sight of the fact that what matters in the end
is the "feel how" of walking.

* Frankly, my advice to those genuinely interested in walking has always been
to forget the books and to get out and get on with it.  Relying on the
two finest teachers in the business, trial and error.  I'm not at all sure
a piece of me that doesn't still stand by that advice.

"Once you become a walker, you become a conservationist: no one can walk
for days on-end through wild and unspoiled country and then stumble on some
man-perpetrated horror without having his blood start to boil.*
	*At least, I used to think this was so.  I'm afraid I am no longer
	so sure.

Appendix IV: Pleasant Quotes for Contemplative Walkers

While some people take dispute with the above as being "elitist,"
counters those those call of elitism exist.  Those counters are not
included at this point for several reasons which not be elaborated.
See the "natural" debate.

-----

From: morset@ccmail.orst.edu (Terry Morse)
Subject: The Noise Needers

The Noise Needers
 excerpted from _Journey Into Summer, by Edwin Way Teale
 (NY: Dodd, Mead, 1960, pp. 21-22)

". . . It is, no doubt, a measure of the stillness of that day that, for a 
time, the noisiest creatures on the mountaintop were flies.

     Sitting relaxed, aware of all the little sounds around me, enjoying the 
peaceful calm of these mountain heights, I remembered the young barber who
 had cut my hair in a small town a few days before.  His great amibition he 
said, was to work in New York.  There was a city!  For a good many years, he 
explained, each summer he had visited his grandfather on his farm in the 
country.  But he couldn't stand it any more.  Everything was so quiet!  It 
gave him the creeps.  He felt like going out and blowing a trumpet or pounding 
a drum - anything to make a racket.  He represented that new breed, growing in 
numbers, the Noise Needers.

     From the outboard motor to the jet airplane, through the radio and TV, 
the electric razor and the power lawnmower, almost every mechanical advance 
has added to the noise of the world.  Each successive generation lives in a 
less quiet environment.  In consequence, evolution is at work in massed urban 
centers.  For evolution concerns the present as well as the past, ourselves as 
well as the dinosaurs.  Noise is evolving not only the endurers of noise but 
the needers of noise.

     Those whose nervous systems are disturbed by uproar are handicapped 
under such conditions.  They are less fitted to maintain good health, to 
endure and to increase their kind than are those who thrive on clamor.  What 
is strain and distraction to one is a stimulant and a tonic to the other.  In 
step with noisier times, the number of Noise Needers is growing.  I was told 
recently of the art editor of a chain of magazines who carries a pocket radio 
with him all day long and even places it, turned on, under his pillow when he 
goes to bed at night.  Noise is comforting and reassuring to him.  He seems in 
his proper environment when quiet is eliminated.  The metallic clangor of 
rock-and-roll music is, perhaps, symptomatic of the steady rise in the number 
of Noise Needers.  For them, quiet is somehow unnatural, stillness is somehow 
unfriendly.  They feel better, more at home, when they are surrounded by a din 
-- any kind of din.  They do not merely tolerate noise.  They like noise.  
They need noise.     

   Their world, and those who inhabit it, were far away as I sat in the hush 
of the mountain glade.  . . ."

Terry Morse
morset@ccmail.orst.edu

**********************************************************************
"Snowmobiles, jet skis, dirt bikes, ATVs - ah for the days when people
lived lives of _quiet_ desperation." -- Terry Morse
**********************************************************************                                
-----

Rachel Carson was perhaps the most influential environmentalist
to have lived in the modern era.  She wrote simply and clearly, and when
her ideas came under attack, she was ultimately vindicated.  If you want
to learn about the backcountry environment, you will find no
finer set of books.  They rank with Darwin's Origin of Species
by Means of Natural Selection.  She died in 1963 of breast cancer.

"We still think in terms of conquest.  We still haven't become mature enough
to think of ourselves as only a tiny part of a vast and incredible universe.
Man's attitude toward nature is today critically important simply because
we have now acquired a fateful power to alter and destroy nature.  But
man is a part of nature and his war against nature is inevitablly a war
against himself.  The rains have become an instrument to bring down
from the atmosphere the deadly products of atomic explosions.  Water,
which is probably our most important natural resource, is now used and
reused with incredible recklessness.  Now, I truly believe that we in this
generation must come to terms with nature, and I think we're challenged
as mankind has never been challenged before to prove our maturity
And our mastery, not of nature, but of ourselves."
		--Rachel Carson
			"The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson"
			Copyright \(co 1963 CBS Reports,
			Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc.

*After publication of Silent Spring, certain spokesmen for the
pesticide industry claimed that Rachel Carson was not a trained biologist.
For them should be reserved a special corner in the Library of Hell,
equipped with a barnacle-covered bench and a whale-oil lamp, by whose
light they would be compelled to read out loud her masters thesis:
"The Development of the Pronephros During the Embryonic and Early
Larval of the Catfish (Inctalurus Punctatus)."
		--Paul Brooks
		"The House of Life: Rachel Carson at Work," 1972,1989
		Her editor

TABLE OF CONTENTS of this chain:

8/ Fletcher's Law of Inverse Appreciation and Rachel Carson <* THIS PANEL *>
9/ Water Filter wisdom
10/ Volunteer Work
11/ Snake bite
12/ Netiquette
13/ Questions on conditions and travel
14/ Dedication to Aldo Leopold
15/ Leopold's lot.
16/ Morbid backcountry/memorial
17/ Information about bears
18/ Poison ivy, frequently ask, under question
19/ Lyme disease, frequently ask, under question
20/ "Telling questions" backcountry Turing test
21/ AMS
22/ Words from Foreman and Hayduke
23/ A bit of song (like camp songs)
24/ What is natural?
25/ A romantic notion of high-tech employment
26/ Other news groups of related interest, networking
27/ Films/cinema references
28/ References (written)
1/ DISCLAIMER
2/ Ethics
3/ Learning I
4/ learning II (lists, "Ten Essentials," Chouinard comments)
5/ Summary of past topics
6/ Non-wisdom: fire-arms topic circular discussion
7/ Phone / address lists

Article 57347 of rec.backcountry:
From: hbgeo002@huey.csun.edu (jeffrey trust)
Newsgroups: rec.backcountry
Subject: Re: Hiking philosophies
Organization: California State University Northridge
Message-ID: <33k3b0$171@nic-nac.CSU.net>
References: <33g4g7$10h@sun.lclark.edu> <33gb6b$52b@hacgate2.hac.com> <33j6v8$9qc@carbon.denver.colorado.edu>

Robert Pirsig, quoted in _The_Earth_Speaks_:

Mountains should be climbed with
as little effort as possible and without desire.
The reality of your own nature should determine the speed.
If you become restless, speed up.  If you become winded, slow down.
You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. 
Then, when you're no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn't just a
means to an end but a unique even in itself.  *This* leaf has jagged edges.
*This* rock looks loose.  From *this* place the snow is less visible,
even though closer.  These are things you should notice anyway. 
To live only for some future goal is shallow.
It's the sides of the mountains which sustain life, not the top...
[end]

Can't say I'd always agree with this, but when I'm in a rambling mood....


--
Jeffrey Trust (jtrust@huey.csun.edu).  Student, Dept. of Geological Sciences,
California State University, Northridge (for which I don't speak).
"The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their
energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves."  -John Muir


Newsgroups: rec.backcountry
Subject: [l/m 6/28/96] Eco-warriors		Distilled Wisdom (22/28) XYZ


This note is not an endorsement of certain techniques which might
be construded as illegal.  It is provided purely for informational
and amusement purposes only.

From Dave Foreman

Strategic Monkeywrenching:
Monkeywrench alone or with few and absolutely trusted partners.
Keep a low profile
Avoid sporting "Hayduke Lives" bumperstickers or patches or other visible
emblems.
Keep "Ecodefense" out of sight.
Keep a closed mouth.
Do not draw media attention.
Avoid targeting national security-related targets or major industrial
facilities.
Avoid those who talk about monkeywrenching.
Avoid or ostracize lunatics, advocates of violences, or immature, macho
bigmouths.
Minimize the use of monkeywrenching techniques that might be characterized as
"violent."
Avoid public statements or writing that can be construed as advocating
violence.
Be willing to disavow stupid acts.
Avoid the use or possession of illegal drugs.

Remember:
Monkeywrenching is nonviolent.
Monkeywrenching is not organizaed.
Monkeywrenching is individual.
Monkeywrenching is targeted.
Monkeywrenching is timely.
Monkeywrenching is dispersed.
Monkeywrenching is diverse.
Monkeywrenching is fun.
Monkeywrenching is not revolutionary.
Monkeywrenching is simple.
Monkeywrenching is deliberate and ethical.

Intellectual masturabation provides philosophical counters to
monkeywrenching.  By checking the written literature, the reader will find
all the counters to these arguments (some over 200 years old):
	The destruction of property is wrong.
	Breaking the law is wrong.
	Current resource management is sound; these is no bioloigcal crisis;	
	so monkeywrenching is unnecessary.
	Monkeywrenching is undemocractic, and imposes extremist beliefs on
	others. [One of the best sounding and most misguided old arguments
	is the belief in "multiple-use."  It isn't.]
	Monkeywrenching is a tactic of poor losers.
	Monkeywrenching isn't playing fair.
	Monkeywrenching threatens human being with injury or death: it is
	"eco-terrorism." [Foreman says it up there.  Read it yourself.
	You have just heard propaganda.]
	Monkeywrenching turns one into a criminal.
	Monkeywrenching leads to vandalism, disrespect for law, and the
	breakdown of society.
	By advocating monkeywrenching, one is liable for all excesses --
	even those where someone has obviously strayed from published
	guidelines.
	If you monkeywrench, you should take credit for your actions
	and accept punishment as one does for any act of civil disobedience.
	Monkeywrenching "lowers the standards of civility another notch."
	By using economic loss as a deterrent, monkeywrenchers buy into the
	materialistic system.
	Destroying machines is wrong.
	Monkeywrenching costs jobs. [E. Abbey: "Cancer causes jobs."]
	Monkeywrenching is ineffective.
	Monkeywrenching give the entire environmental movement a bad name
	and causes an antienvironmental backlash.
Read Foreman for elaborations on all of the above.

Advice from George Washington Hayduke:
1. Prepare a plan.
2. Gather intelligence.
3. Buy away from home.
4. Never tip your hand.
5. Never admit anything.
6. Never apologize; it's a sign of weakness.

*Published in several of his books.  Check Books-in-Print for current books.

A couple of suggested additions to your distilled wisdom:

1. Monkeywrenching is illegal.
2. Monkeywrenching is deliberate damage to property so as to make
   it unusable to various legal uses.
3. Monkeywrenching is deliberately placing the life and property of a
    human being at risk. 
4. Monkeywrenching is deliberately violating the constitutional rights
    of another human being (if done in the USA).
5. Monkeywrenching is an aspect of intellectual arrogance.

Notes:
1. This should be obvious, given the advice of Foreman that you cite,
   but you probably should clarify it.
2. This again should be obvious -- but it points up WHY
   monkeywrenching is illegal.
3. "Ethical" monkeywrenchers seek to minimize the risk to life -- but
   they can't escape the fact that people have been seriously injured
   due to their actions. (Anyone killed yet?)
4. See "due process" and "protection of property rights" decisions of
   the Supreme Court.  
5. As in "I know better than any opponent what should be done here."

Conclusary note:
  Even given all of the above, there may be times when Monkeywrenching
is all that remains to prevent an atrocity.  But remember what happened 
to the Luddites and be prepared to suffer likewise!
				Tim

"Here be monsters."

"Beware all ye gods who dare to better the fate of mankind,
 For yours is the fate of Prometheus...."

...
You miss one of the more powerful intellectual arguments against
monkeywrenching, which is:

	It gets certain people mad enough to shoot you.  Since you're
	sneaking around avoiding everybody anyway, nobody will see him
	do it.  In fact you'll be lucky if anybody ever finds your
	corpse.

Good luck finding a counterargument for that one in the 200+ years of
printed literature.

--
Norman Yarvin						yarvin@cs.yale.edu
 "I never refuse to be on speaking terms with anybody; you lose so many
  opportunities of saying disagreeable things."  -- Lord Fisher.


From: Richard Walker <walker@Starbase.NeoSoft.COM>
Message-Id: <199409221333.IAA08630@Starbase.NeoSoft.COM>
Subject: Re: [l/m 7/26/94] Eco-warriors  Distilled Wisdom (22/28) XYZ

: This note is not an endorsement of certain techniques which might
: be construded as illegal.  It is provided purely for informational
: and amusement purposes only.

Maybe something to add...

If you monkeywrench some logging equipment, it can be repaired or replaced
and they can come back later.

If in reprisal, someone dynamites a scenic waterfall, how will you repair this?


"Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for."
	# well, I don't believe Foreman would quite go along with this,
	# but I will add it.
old TABLE OF CONTENTS of this chain:

22/ Words from Foreman and Hayduke		<* THIS PANEL *>
23/ A bit of song (like camp songs)
24/ What is natural?
25/ A romantic notion of high-tech employment
26/ Other news groups of related interest, networking
27/ Films/cinema references
28/ References (written)
1/ DISCLAIMER
2/ Ethics
3/ Learning I
4/ learning II (lists, "Ten Essentials," Chouinard comments)
5/ Summary of past topics
6/ Non-wisdom: fire-arms topic circular discussion
7/ Phone / address lists
8/ Fletcher's Law of Inverse Appreciation / advice and Rachel Carson
9/ Water Filter wisdom
10/ Volunteer Work
11/ Snake bite
12/ Netiquette
13/ Questions on conditions and travel
14/ Dedication to Aldo Leopold
15/ Leopold's lot.
16/ Morbid backcountry/memorial
17/ Information about bears
18/ Poison ivy, frequently ask, under question
19/ Lyme disease, frequently ask, under question
20/ "Telling questions" backcountry Turing test (under construction)
21/ AMS

old TABLE OF CONTENTS of this chain:

-- 

Looking for an H-912 (container).

User Contributions:

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Sep 28, 2019 @ 6:18 pm
Bad weather scuppers Russian President's flypast as he stages Victory Day show of marine corps power

Putin the actual glitz: gorgeous Russian soldiers take centre stage (moreover selfies) At massive wining Day parade of 13,000 troops, Tanks and rockets as Moscow strongman warns the lessons of WW2 'are relevant once again'Vladimir Putin forced to cancel military flypast over Red Square at the last minute over fears of bad weatherThreat of thunder and cloud over Moscow saw the huge Victory Day display of military powergroundedDespite cancellation Russian president pledged to 'guarantee the high drives of our armed forces'By Chris Dyer For Mailonline and Will Stewart In Russia and Afp and Reuters

issued: 10:14 BST, 9 May 2019 recently: 18:10 BST, 9 probably 2019

Russian lead designer Vladimir Putin took a defiant tone at Moscow's annual military Victory Day parade in Red Square, Declaring that the country continues to strengthen its armed forces.

The Kremlin strongman observed on as 13,000 troops and more than 130 pieces of weaponry were paraded through the capital in a show of Russian military power.

discussing his country's battle with Nazi Germany, Putin then warned 'the lessons of the past war are relevant once again' as he made his case for 'guaranteeing the high faculties of our armed forces'.

Russia's ties with the West soured correct its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, And Moscow has continued to challenge the nation through its staunch support for Syrian President Bashar al Assad and Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro.

Among the hundreds of pieces of military hardware paraded in front of veterans and dignitaries was Russia's Yars mobile global nuclear missile launcher and its advanced S 400 air defence missile system, Which Moscow has deployed in Syria guard its forces and Putin's new 120,000 4.4 lite V 8 ragtop limousine.

have been also regiments of glamorous female soldiers on display who were pictured smiling as they filed past Mr Putin.

It also included military equipment, Ranging from a T 34 tank renowned for its toughness in World War II to lumbering Yars ICBM launch units, Ground to air rocket missile parts and Russian Armata tanks.

Russian female military servicemen march during the Victory Day parade on Red square in Moscow on Thursday afternoon

Smiling Russian naval cadets were pictured marching in perfect step as they filed past Putin the actual Victory Day parade

Russian Armata tanks roll down Red Square the particular Victory Day military parade to celebrate 74 years since the victory in WWII in Red Square in Moscow

Russian Ground Forces commander in Chief, Colonel common Oleg Salyukov salutes the troops from Putin's new 120,000 collapsible limousine during the Victory Day military parade today

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech face to face with St. Basil's Cathedral during the Victory Day parade i which he pledged to'guarantee the high performance of our armed forces'

Russian Yars RS 24 intercontinental ballistic missile systems roll through Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in downtown Moscow today

Vladimir Putin kisses his class teacher at school Vera Gurevich during a certified reception marking 74 years since the victory in WWII, doing Kremlwearing

Russian military law enforcement stand in formation [url=https://medium.com/@oli.t2017/everything-you-need-to-know-ukrainian-women-956bb3bae17a]single ukraine ladies[/url] during a Victory Day Parade in the city of Grozny, Chechen Republic

Former Soviet chief Mikhail Gorbachev (core) Is in the middle of his assistants as he arrives to attend the Victory Day military parade in Red Square today

Crowds of people carry portraits of their relatives who fought in World War II as they have fun playing the Immortal Regiment march on Tverskaya Street in Moscow

Russian Pacific Fleet leader, Admiral Sergei Avakyants compares the troops in a vintage car during the Vi (...)

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