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[l/m 4/16/01] Leopold's Land Ethic Distilled Wisdom (14/28) XYZ

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Part8 - Part9 - Part10 - Part11 - Part12 - Part13 - Part14 - Part15 - Part16 - Part17 - Part18 - Part19 - Part20 - Part21 - Part22 - Part23 - Part24 - Part25 - Part26 - Part27 - Part28 )
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Panel 14

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
If we had in the city six vacant lots available to youngsters of a
certain neighborhood for playing ball, it might be 'development' to
build houses on the first, and the second, and the third, and the fourth,
and even on the fifth, but when we build houses on the last one, we forget
what houses are for.  The sixth house would not be development at all
but rather stupidity.
--Aldo Leopold

What avail are forty freedoms without a blank spot on the map?
--Aldo Leopold

I am glad I will not be young in a future without wilderness.
--Aldo Leopold

"The first rule of intelligent tinkering is to save all the pieces."
--Aldo Leopold

"The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; and what I have
been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation of the World.
 Every tree sends it fibres forth in search of the Wild.  The cities import
it at any price.  Men plow and sail for it. . . . .
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
"Life consists with wildness.  The most alive is the wildest.  Not yet
subdued by man, its presence refreshes him. . . .
      Hope and future for me are not in lawns and cultivated fields, not in
towns and cities, but in the impervious and quacking swamps.. . .etc."
    Henry David Thoreau, "Walking" (Essays, Dillman ed.), pp. 129, 130

The opposition is largely composed of "short-haired women and long-haired
men."		-- Marsdon Manson

"How many wilderness areas do we need?"
"How many Brahms symphonies do we need?" -- Robert Marshall

Do not be swayed by seemingly democractic arguments.  --David Brower 1944.

The Majority already has its roads and hotels.
Only a small minority enjoy art galleries, libraries, and universities.
Yet no one would suggest making these facilities into bowling alleys,
circuses, or hot dog stands just because more people would use them.
Quality has a claim as well as quantity.  -- Robert Marshall

Do you flood the Sistine chapel so that the tourists can get closer to
the ceiling?  -- David Brower

     Nov. 15, 1853
     After having some business dealings with men,
     I am occasionally chagrined, and feel as if I had done some
     wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance. I  
     see that such intercourse long continued would make one
     thoroughly prosaic, hard, and coarse.  But the longest intercourse
     with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does not 
     thus harden and make coarse.  A hard insensible man whom
     we liken to a rock is indeed much harder than a rock.  
     From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have no sympathy,
     I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft.
-- Henry David Thoreau.

The West of which I speak is but another name
for the Wild; and what I have been preparing to say is,
that in Wildness is the preservation of the World.  
Every tree sends its fibers forth in search of the Wild.  
The cities import it at any price. Men plow and sail for it.
From the forest and wilderness come the tonics and
barks which brace mankind.  Our ancestors were savages.
The story of Romulus and Remus being suckled
by a wolf is not a meaningless fable.  The founders of
every state which has risen to eminence have drawn
their nourishment and vigor from a similar wild source.
It was because the children of the Empire were not
suckled by the wolf that they were conquered and displaced
by the children of the northern forests who were.
			-- Henry David Thoreau's essay "Walking":

  If you are ready to leave father and mother, and brother and sister, and
wife and child and friends, and never see them again - if you have paid your
debts,and made your will, and settled all your affairs, and are a free man,
then you are ready for a walk. -- Thoreau


  "Wilderness complements and completes civilization.  I might say that the 
  existence of wilderness is also a compliment to civilization.  Any society 
  that feels itself too poor to afford the preservation of wilderness is not 
  worthy of the name of civilization."
                                                          Edward Abbey
  (From _Down the River_ quoted in _Saving Nature's Legacy_, by Noss and 
Cooperrider)


Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are
beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home;
that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks
and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber
and irrigating rivers but as fountain of life.
                --John Muir
        From "The Wild Parks and Forest Reservations of the West,"
        Atlantic Monthly, January 1898


Dare to be naive.
        R. Buckminster Fuller

Fortune favors the bold.
        Virgil (70-19 BC)

To win without risk is to triumph without glory.
        Pierre Corneille

Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.
        Robert F. Kennedy

He that will not sail till all dangers are over must never put to sea.
        Thomas Fuller (1608-1661)

Better hazard once than always be in fear.
        Thomas Fuller (1608-1661)

The policy of being too cautious is the greatest risk of all.
        Jawaharlal Nehru (1889-1964)

He who doesn't risk never gets to drink champagne.
        Russian saying

Only those who will risk going too far can
possibly find out how far one can go.
        T.S. Eliot (1888-1965)

Don't be afraid to take a big step when one is indicated.
You can't cross a chasm in two small steps.
        David Lloyd George (1863-1945), British Prime Minister

In the long run, we get no more than
we have been willing  to risk giving.
        Sheldon B. Kopp [psychiatrist] (1929-    )

When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters.
One represents danger and the other represents opportunity.
        John F. Kennedy (1917-1963)

I understand by "freedom of spirit" something quite definite -- the
unconditional will to say No, where it is dangerous to say No.
        Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900)

Risk! Risk Anything! Care no more for
the opinion of others, for those other
voices. Do the hardest thing on earth
for you. Act for yourself. Face the truth.
        Katherine Mansfield

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional!

"Do nothing to mar its grandeur for the ages have been at work upon it
and man cannot improve it. Keep it for your children, your children's children,
and all who come after you..."
		--Theodore Roosevelt


What is harder than rock or softer than water?
Yet soft water hollows out hard rock.
Persevere.
-Ovid (43 BC - AD 18)


I got four things to live by:
Don't say nothin' without hurting anybody.
Don't give advice: nobody will take it anyway.
Don't complain.
Don't explain.
--Walter "Death Valley" Scott(y)


"We shall not cease from exploration. And the end of all our
exploring will be to arrive where we started.
And know the place for the first time." --T.S. Eliot


Leave the [Grand Canyon/Yosemite] as it is.  You cannot improve upon it.
But what you can do is keep it for your children, your children's children,
all who come after you.
	--T. Roosevelt


"I seek acquaintance with Nature,--to know her moods and manners.
Primitive nature is the most interesting to me.   I take infinite pains
to know all the phenomena of spring, for instance, thinking that I have
here the entire poem, and then, to my chagrin, I learn that it is but
an imperfect copy that i possess and have read, that my ancestors have
torn out many of the first leaves and grandest passages, and mutilated
it in many places.   I should not like to think that some demigod
had come before me and picked out some of the best of the stars.
I wish to know and entire heaven and an entire earth."
March 23, 1856
"In Wildness Is The Preservation of the World".
 Selections & Photographs by Eliot Porter.



The next post is this chain's "empty lot."
Text to be added to all other links in the chain, but the next one,
should never be touched.


TABLE OF CONTENTS of this chain:

14/ Dedication to Aldo Leopold				<* THIS PANEL *>
15/ Leopold's lot.
16/ Morbid backcountry/memorial
17/ Information about bears
18/ Poison ivy, frequently ask, under question
19/ Lyme disease, frequently ask, under question
20/ "Telling questions" backcountry Turing test
21/ AMS
22/ Babies and Kids
23/ A bit of song (like camp songs)
24/ What is natural?
25/ A romantic notion of high-tech employment
26/ Other news groups of related interest, networking
27/ Films/cinema references
28/ References (written)

1/ DISCLAIMER
2/ Ethics
3/ Learning I
4/ learning II (lists, "Ten Essentials," Chouinard comments)
5/ Summary of past topics
6/ Non-wisdom: fire-arms topic circular discussion
7/ Phone / address lists
8/ Fletcher's Law of Inverse Appreciation / Rachel Carson / Foreman and Hayduke
9/ Water Filter wisdom
10/ Volunteer work
11/ Snake bite
12/ Netiquette
13/ Questions on conditions and travel

-- 

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