Search the FAQ Archives

3 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M
N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z
faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives

[l/m 6/24/2009] Telling questions r.b. Turing test DW: (20/28) XYZ

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Part8 - Part9 - Part10 - Part11 - Part12 - Part13 - Part14 - Part15 - Part16 - Part17 - Part18 - Part19 - Part20 - Part21 - Part22 - Part23 - Part24 - Part25 - Part26 - Part27 - Part28 )
[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index | Business Photos and Profiles ]
Descriptive portion of the test

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
True or false:

New York is where I'd rather stay.  I get allergic smelling hay.
I just adore a penthouse view.  Darling I love you, but give me Park Avenue.
Fresh Air...
				Times square...
You are my wife
				Good bye city life
Green Acres We are THERE!!!!

If True, hit 'n' now.


Thermarest index:  For sleeping (select one)
A) Bed (perhaps water) with a canopy and mirror above are required.
B) A feather bed is the ONLY requirement.
C) A nice firm mattress suits me fine, a hotel room or vehicle will do.
D) A tent over my head is a necessity.
E) A Thermarest is the only way to go.
F) An Ensolite is quite adequate for me.
G) A flat bed of sand is enough in summer time.
H) Any flat ledge is comfortable.  Pad?  Too heavy.


Water index:
I) Perrier, s'il vous plait?

J) In the desert, I insist the water I drink be clear and bug free.

K) I have to be able to clearly see the bottom of the cut before I drink the
water.

L) The presence of a few floaters, sinkers or suspensions in my water does
not bother me.  Zooplankton add protein.

M) A little grit helps the digestive tract.


Fire index:
N) Nothing like a nice, big, roaring camp (bon) fire.  Makes it feel homey.

O) Ugh!  Can we make Red-man fire?

P) Fire?!  I'm telling Smokey the Bear on you!


Fire index 2 (aka stove index):
Q) I know how to use the microwave

R) Gas heats best.

S) Priming?  I prefer Bleuet

T) I eat food cold.

U) Svea priming?  No sweat, just slobber with fuel.

V) MSR priming?  Sure, in a tent.


Can you explain how a Svea, Primus, or Optimus stove works?


Fire index 3:

V) I can't even get my stove to light.

W) "I love the smell of napalm in the morning."

X) Dowse with white gas and light.

Y) Start stove.  Start wood fire using the stove.

Z) Matches/Bic lighter

A) Flint and steel

B) Rub two sticks


Earth index:
Which word do you use with frequency:

C) Dirt (or mud)

D) Soil (or loam)

E) Earth (or regolith)


Fauna Index
F) Animals!  Ugh!  Dirty.

G) Animals!  Ah, so cute, don't you just want to feed them?

H) Well, we're not supposed to, but just a little crumb is okay.

I) Nope, nothing what so ever.  Camp robbers!

J) Nope, nothing what so ever.  Natural foods for you.

K) Don't get started.


Mosquito index:
L) A pith helmet and net for me.

M) DEET is fine.

N) Bugs?  What bugs?

O) When you swat a mosquito and it falls into you food, you think:
	Fresh protein.

P) Bring out the DDT.


Plant index:
Terminology
Which word do you use with frequency:
Q) Weeds

R) Plants

S) Flora


On a scale of 1-10, rate the value of toilet paper.


Bathing/Washing Index:
Note the maximum number of days you would go without a bath or shower:
(Simple hand washings can be ignored [assume IEEE Floating Point: Inf is
an option])

Note the number of days you would go without shaving (face for men, legs for
women): (Inf is still an option)

Technology index:
T) The thin mylar spaceblankets reflect 90% of your body's heat back to you.
	They are quite adequate.

U) Clothing colors must coordinate like Liz Claiborne.

V) A down comforter is the way to go.

W) Everything should be Patagonia (or LL Bean).

X) Covered in thick rugged wool from head to toe (olive drab is the usual
	color).

Y) What ever I can afford.  If I can pay for fiberfill, then so be it.


Compass index:

Z) Why bother? The only use of a topo map I know is to start fires.

A) Ask someone which way is north.

B) I can use a compass to find magnetic north.

C) I can use a compass and the magnetic declination to find true north.

D) I can use a compass and the magnetic declination to find map north.

Navigation index:

E) I need a (large) landmark that I know I'm South of.

F) I need a compass to find north

G) I can find the north star on a clear night

H) If the sun is shining then I can find north using a watch or a 3 foot stick.

Swim index I:

H) Where's the hot tub?

I) Not unless it's heated and chlorinated.

J) Only if it is fairly weed and algea free.

K) As long as it's wet and ice free.

L) Chop a hole in the ice and jump in.


Swim index II:

M) Not without a swimsuit.

N) Underware will do in a pinch.

O) Skinnydipping is ok if I'm alone.

P) Skinnydipping is ok if no members of the opposite sex are near.

Q) I don't care who is watching.  Just grin and "bare" it.


Temperature index (i.e. temperature ranges one is willing to be
outside [with adequate clothing and water])
R) 60 to 70F
S) 40 to 80F
T) 20 to 90F
U)  0 to 100F
V) -20 to 110F
W) absolute zero to infinity.


Real test starts here:
Telling questions:

You are hiking on a trail when you catch up to another party
travelling in the same direction but slower. Do you:
	a) Pass them without saying a word.
	b) Ask to pass.
	c) Stay behind them.
Why?  Name other conditions which may effect this answer.

You are packing with friends who are enjoying those dehydrated meals
(you know, the same ones you eat).  As you are cleaning up for the
evening, you notice your friend throw that nice little foil and
plastic pouch into the fire.  What do you do?

Would you be backpacking|climbing, etc. if the equipment weighed
twice as much?

Would you be backpacking|climbing, etc. if you had to bring all the
water you were going to use on the trip in from the trail head?  assume
4 liters/4 kg (1 gallon/8 lbs) per person per day.

Would you be backpacking|climbing, etc. if you had to pack eveything
including fecal matter out?

Driving home on a steep, twisty mountain road at night.  You come
upon an accident.  The fire danger is very high.  Do you put road
flares out?

You, your spouse, and your child have an accident.  Given an
equal probability of rescue, which you can only do once,
who do you save?

You witness two people wander onto a frozen lake and fall thru.
What is the first rule of rescue?

Is the privilege of just seeing Yosemite enough?

How much would you pay for gas to visit the backcountry?

You are on Mt. Everest.  Two members of your international team
were climbing high.  A tyrolean traverse was needed to return.
The German member thought nothing of this section and started
back, but his partner, the Indian member had trouble.  The
German waited and stompped his feet until he could take it no
more.  He went back to camp and got you the assistant climbing
leader.  You rushed up high as quickly as your could with 6
other members.  You wisely grabbed a set of ski poles as wands
to find your way back.  Night is approaching and a storm is
coming.  You reach the Indian; he is badly frozen but alive.
The members decide to try to lower into a crevice to escape
the storm.  Hacking together available fixed rope, you lower
the stricten Indian, but you are 40 feet, too short.  What do
you do?

See the film Back to the Future III.  In one scene, the character
Marty gets some water.  Would you drink it?

You are faced with making a dicey rock climbing move.
Your only real hold is a locker finger jam.  If you bury your finger
in the jam and fall, you will most likely severely damage/lose the finger.
If you loosely grip the hold, you will probably fall.
How do you make the move?

A heel hook is the most secure way to make the move, but if you fall upside
down while hooking, you may get hurt.

If you try to clip a fixed piece midway through a strenuous crux,
you will probably pump out and fall, but if you don't clip it you may
take a long whipper.

If you try to make turns while skiing an icy slope, you will probably fall,
but if you don't make turns, you may develop a dangerous amount of speed.

True or false: The natural world exists and only has value in the
context of Mankind.

If you take the bivy sack to the summit, you will probably need it,
but if you don't....

You are driving to the woods.  You arrive at a broken traffic intersection
street light.  Four cars arrive simultaneously from each of the four
directions.  Who goes first?

You are offered a class on wilderness medicine on a given weekend.  You
were hoping to go backpacking that weekend.  Do you take the class or do
you go backpacking (and hope you will not need the class before you have
another chance to take it)?

Would you defend your family, even if it meant breaking the law?
Would you defend your house, when only property and not life was threatened,
even if it meant breaking the law?
Would you defend your environment, even if it meant breaking the law?

Your new husband is from Alaska, "the frozen state," do you move up there
and join him?

Your new wife is from New York City, the concrete jungle. Do you move
there to join her?

You are snowmobiling in Yellowstone in winter.  You see a bison break thru
the ice into the frozen river.  Assume you have a rope.  Do you rescue the
bison?  A ranger comes by, what do you think the ranger would say?

You come across a pair of turkeys busyly making sure that there will be
a new generation of turkeys.  Do you watch quietly, make some noise (so
that they know you are there) or leave (letting them have some privacy)?
What if they are human instead of feathered?
What if the story involved bears|bares instead?

If a tree falls in a forest and no human is around, does it make a sound?
If a tree falls in a forest and no human is around, does it have data?

At what age, or how do you tell, when you become too old to drive?

Rappeling has been justly flamed in many recent posts - but I have to
respond a little. Not every group of rappelers you encounter out are
necessarily rap-junkie nerds. I helped teach a vertical techniques
class to a group of cavers a couple weeks ago - and vertical techniques
for cavers means rappel and jumar practice. Your choice - you are
several hours underground, following a good breeze down a streamway, and
you come to the top of a pit of unknown depth. Typically, it is smooth
walled and overhanging. Rappel or downclimb? Remember, this is a stream
passage - whatever you do, you are going to be in the water. Ok, so you
rap the pit...on the return trip, you are now confronted by an overhanging,
smooth walled, waterfall - that happens to have a nice static rope hanging
down in it. Climb, perhaps using the rope as a top belay, or jumar?
Second scenario: El Sotano de las Golondrinas, Mexico. Here you have a 
pit some 200 feet in diameter, opening to the surface, which bells out
quickly below the lip. On the near side, the bottom is 1100 feet straight
down. The walls of the pit are pretty solid near the top, but very rotten
in several layers. Downclimb or rappel? You rap, of course, assuming you
planned ahead and brought adequate rope (we had a 1500' PMI when I was
there a few years back). You rig off a block that hangs over the edge, and
never touch the wall after the first five feet - by the time you reach the
bottom, the walls are many hundred feet distant. Ascent: climb or jumar?
Jumar, of course - but if you are going to be doing much of this kind of
thing, you are going to develop some strange systems for climbing rope.
Two jumars and a pair of etriers just don't cut it after a couple hundred
feet of free hanging rope.

Do you trench your tent?

You are skiing in mountainous backcountry with a group of five skiers.  The
trail emerges from the trees on a sidehill.  Trees are absent above and below
the trail, but reappear about 150 feet ahead.  What do you do?
Suppose you are on the return leg of a 15 mile loop.  What do you do?
Consider equipment you may have and weather conditions over the past month
when solving the problem.

You are to lead a backcountry skiing day trip.  The trip is only 6 miles
long, round trip.  The elevation is over 11,000 feet.  The sky is clear.
Two members of the group show up expecting to ski in blue jeans.  Do you
allow them to go?

Your car dies in a desert, 30 miles from the nearest town.  It is early
morning and the temperature is already over 100 degrees.  No one will miss
you for the next week (you are on vacation).  No one is likely to drive past
in the next week either.  You only have 1 quart of water.  Do you stay
with the car or start walking to town?  Do you drink the the water as
you feel you are thirsty or do you try to ration it?


You started walking on heather moorland on a bright, 50 degree F day
in Spring.  10 miles out, it turns to driving sleet (30 mph wind with
half-frozen rain) and you cannot see where you are going.  The only
shelter is in the peat hags, which are full of water.  What do you do?


You tend to participate in activities above your skill level, i.e.
ski black slopes as an intermediate skier, do not attend classes,
or use gear designed for teh activity (i.e. backpacking w/ only an
old sleeping bag, a zippo lighter, a bag of tortilla chips and
a Sunday paper).
Is ths acceptable behaviour?  Does the 'go with the flow' attitude
enhance or detract from the experience?  Does the 'well, I won't hurt
anyone else if I screw up' attitude remove moral culpability?


Five guys are crossing a glacier near the Chinese border, a kind of neutral
strip. They spent 2 months for getting a permit to there - they had to
convince the Border Guard. Suddenly a military helicopter drops them a
capsule. Inside is an order to come back. Should they go back =?

A band of four is swiftly skiing across a treeless rugged backountry towards
the ridges of Ural. They do it for 4 days, crossing numerous passages. All of a
sudden, one of them tells to their leader that he has a stomach ulcer and
it just turned worse. =?

You just went to sleep at your tent in a nice valley of Caucasus. Suddenly
a ranger wakes you up asking for help and good anesthetics: somebody up
there fell and has a vertebrae problem. Surprisingly you have what they
haven't. A night ascent -> that lady with crushed vertebrae is not to be
brutally transported -> there's a chance to get a copter, but no
walkie-talkie. These poor rangers have a car radio below in the valley.
You spend the rest of the night to get there. There really is one ranger
in the car, and he's absolutely drunk, barely able to say something.
he says: tha-yk! you guys yek! would you -wmmm? drink too - =?
 
You got a ticket to a plane that flies from the city of Norilsk to a frozen
lake at Putorana Mountains, some 300 miles ahead. The plane appears to be
out of order, so you are told to be ready to use the next flight - which is
2 weeks later. Meanwhile, your permit is issued by the Border Guard and
expires a month later. It's possible to get to mountains by ski - their
foothills are just in 140 miles from you. =?

You just broke/lost your compass in the middle of an eight hour (or
eight day) hike and you are in a maze of twisty little valleys very
similar.  How can you find your way out?  (assume going down stream
will not get you to civilianization in a reasonable time.)

Should a less-visited park such as Isle Royale, which could probably not
be supported by visitor fees, exist?

Smallpox has been largely destroyed - should the virus be given
endanged species status? (Would an infected person then be denied
treatment?)

You become injured on a remote, solo climbing trip, and find yourself
trapped on a high ledge. You cannot expect rescue for many weeks. A
small seep provides you with water, but you ran out of food several
days ago. You have an opportunity to kill the a condor...

A certain small cave contains a rare subspecies of salamader, known
nowhere else in the world. a) The entire population in the cave is
destroyed when the small entrance is blocked by a careless bulldozer
operator cutting a logging road. b) The entire population in the cave
is destroyed when the entrance collapses after an exceptionally
heavy thunderstorm. Remark on differences between a and b. The cave
salamander fills a dead-end ecological niche - the survival or loss
of the cave ecosystem will have no impact on even the local surface
ecosystem. Does this in any way affect previous remarks?

Is wilderness (or nature) only valuable to the extent that people "use"
it, or does it have intrinsic worth apart from any use it may receive?

Does a wilderness area primarily closed to recreational visitation have
value?


For example, lets say for the sake of discussion that a sizeable (1/4 million
acre) U.S. wilderness area exists where most of the area is off-limits to
recreational visitation.
Do you believe that such an area is a good thing, or a bad thing?

Does this land have value, or is it being held in a "worthless state"?

What if the purpose of the use restriction is to protect or
restore an endangered species?  A threatened ecosystem?  Would
it matter whether or not any of the species were "directly
beneficial" to man?

What if the purpose of the restriction is as a control area
so that researchers can determine the scale of human impact
on other areas within that ecosystem?

If this area is close to a major metropolitan area, does the
answer change?  What if there are other wilderness areas near
this area?  What if there aren't?

You and your buddy are elk hunting (in season). You have a bull tag and your
buddy has a cow tag. Your having lunch and a cow walks into the clearing in
front of you, your buddys gun jams and he says "take it for me." What do
you do?

You see and hear along way off a car hit a deer (not deer season, and your
out shooting coyotes [with a .223 & 70 gr bullets:-)]) and the deer runs
in front of you with its guts hanging out... Oh, and it has a very large
rack... What would you do?

Or-

Your out hunting pheasants, limit is three. You shoot three your first
pass down the corn field and your buddy hit none. What do you do? Stick a
bird or two in your buddy's pouch and keep hunting or quit?


If something happens to me when I take my kids on a canoe trip,
can they cope until help comes?  


What do I do about a bullying scout during a canoe trip?


Before you are the disassembled parts of a high powered hunting
rifle and the assembly directions written in Swahili, in five
minutes an angry rhino will charge into your room.  Solve this problem.

Can you prove your educational flexibility?



You are in a virgin cave (no rescue is possible,
no one knows the cave even exists) and headed down a pit in that cave.
Your partner (you should never go caving alone) has already fallen to
certain death leaving you stranded on a ledge about halfway between
top and bottom, about 60 meters up.
There is no possibility of climbing either up or down --
this is wet, slippery, muddy rock.  The rope has swung well out of reach.
Do you jump?  Do you wait 'til either sleep or starvation or
thirst or something rolls you off the ledge?
Do you leap for the rope knowing you can't possibly leap that far?
Do you think someone is really nuts to even think about this kind of stuff?




YOU ARE IN A MAZE WITH TWISTY PASSAGES ALL ALIKE.

What is the role of forgetting to an AI system?

So if you had the choice to save from a burning building,
a Rembrandt or a cat, which would you save?


You're in a desert walking along in the sand when
all of a sudden you look down, and you see a tortoise.
It's crawling toward you.  You reach down; you flip the tortoise on its back.
The tortoise lays on its back, its belly baking in the hot sun,
beating it's legs trying to turn itself over; but it can't,
not without your help, but you are not helping.  Why is that?


Good questions always sought.

If you think the out of doors is a social process or a social club,
that the forest is like Bambi, or Rambo, or the movies,
you are mistaken.  This is how track skiers and sport climbers get
into trouble in increasing numbers.  Get out while you can.

--rec.backcountry.nimng ranger


TABLE OF CONTENTS of this chain:

20/ "Telling questions" backcountry Turing test		<* THIS PANEL *>
21/ AMS
22/ Babies and Kids
23/ A bit of song (like camp songs)
24/ What is natural?
25/ A romantic notion of high-tech employment
26/ Other news groups of related interest, networking
27/ Films/cinema references
28/ References (written)
1/ DISCLAIMER
2/ Ethics
3/ Learning I
4/ learning II (lists, "Ten Essentials," Chouinard comments)
5/ Summary of past topics
6/ Non-wisdom: fire-arms topic circular discussion
7/ Phone / address lists
8/ Fletcher's Law of Inverse Appreciation / Rachel Carson / Foreman and Hayduke
9/ Water Filter wisdom
10/ Volunteer Work
11/ Snake bite
12/ Netiquette
13/ Questions on conditions and travel
14/ Dedication to Aldo Leopold
15/ Leopold's lot.
16/ Morbid backcountry
17/ Information about bears
18/ Poison ivy, frequently ask, under question
19/ Lyme disease, frequently ask, under question

Message-Id: <199803220253.VAA18016@fh102.infi.net>
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 1998 21:52:36 -0400
From: soilguy@cyberinfo.com (Rich)
To: eugene (Eugene N. Miya)
Subject: Re: [l/m 1/15/98] Telling questions r.b. Turing test DW: (20/28) XYZ
Organization: Ultisols R Us
References: <6etqe7$riv$1@cnn.nas.nasa.gov>



> Earth index:
> Which word do you use with frequency:
> 
> C) Dirt (or mud)
> 
> D) Soil (or loam)
> 
> E) Earth (or regolith)

Definately "D". Extra credit question: What does "loam" mean?


> Mosquito index:
> L) A pit helmet and net for me.
> 
> M) DEET is fine.
> 
> N) Bugs?  What bugs?
> 
> O) When you swat a mosquito and it falls into you food, you think:
>         Fresh protein.

How 'bout: Mosquitoes - Putting people back a few slots in the food chain.


> On a scale of 1-10, rate the value of toilet paper.

Gotta admit, I like the luxury of tp.

> Bathing/Washing Index:
> Note the maximum number of days you would go without a bath or shower:

Any women with me?

 
> Technology index:
> S) The thin mylar spaceblankets reflect 90% of your body's heat back to you.
>         They are quite adequate.
> 
> T) Clothing colors must coordinate like Liz Claiborne.
> 
> U) A down comforter is the way to go.
> 
> V) Everything should be Patagonia (or LL Bean).
> 
> W) Covered in thick rugged wool from head to toe (olive drab is the usual
>         color).
> 
> X) What ever I can afford.  If I can pay for fiberfill, then so be it.


Always been X

> 
> Temperature index (i.e. temperature ranges one is willing to be
> outside [with adequate clothing and water])
> R) 60 to 70F
> S) 40 to 80F
> T) 20 to 90F
> U)  0 to 100F
> V) -20 to 110F
> W) absolute zero to infinity.

W.


> 
> 
> Real test starts here:
> Telling questions:
> 
> You are hiking on a trail when you catch up to another party
> travelling in the same direction but slower. Do you:
>         a) Pass them without saying a word.
>         b) Ask to pass.
>         c) Stay behind them.
> Why?  Name other conditions which may effect this answer.

I lurk behind them until they get The Willies.

> 
> You are packing with friends who are enjoying those dehydrated meals
> (you know, the same ones you eat).  As you are cleaning up for the
> evening, you notice your friend throw that nice little foil and
> plastic pouch into the fire.  What do you do?

Pick it out the next day, and put it in the communal trash bag.

> 
> Would you be backpacking|climbing, etc. if the equipment weighed
> twice as much?

Maybe I'd go only half as far, but i'd go.

> 
> Would you be backpacking|climbing, etc. if you had to bring all the
> water you were going to use on the trip in from the trail head?  assume
> 4 liters/4 kg (1 gallon/8 lbs) per person per day.

Not for more than a couple of nights.

> 
> Would you be backpacking|climbing, etc. if you had to pack eveything
> including fecal matter out?

Who would police this? Would they rub my nose in it?

> 
> Driving home on a steep, twisty mountain road at night.  You come
> upon an accident.  The fire danger is very high.  Do you put road
> flares out?

No. (I don't have any.)

> 
> You, your spouse, and your child have an accident.  Given an
> equal probability of rescue, which you can only do once,
> who do you save?

The kid.

> 
> You witness two people wander onto a frozen lake and fall thru.
> What is the first rule of rescue?

Don't go out there without tethering yourself, and hopefully have someone
else who can pull you back if you go through.

> 
> Is the privilege of just seeing Yosemite enough?

Yes.
> 
> How much would you pay for gas to visit the backcountry?

plenty.


<snip>


> True or false: The natural world exists and only has value in the
> context of Mankind.

Nah!

> 
> If you take the bivy sack to the summit, you will probably need it,
> but if you don't....

you will definately need it.

> 
> You are driving to the woods.  You arrive at a broken traffic intersection
> street light.  Four cars arrive simultaneously from each of the four
> directions.  Who goes first?

In Iowa, you better go first, 'cause the rest will be looking back and
forth at each other till the cows come home. In SC, let the other three
crash into each other, then drive around them.

> 
> You are offered a class on wilderness medicine on a given weekend.  You
> were hoping to go backpacking that weekend.  Do you take the class or do
> you go backpacking (and hope you will not need the class before you have
> another chance to take it)?

Class.

> 
> Is there a situation where you would break the law to defend your family?
> To defend your home?
> To defend your environment?

yup, yup, yup.

<snip>
> 
> Your new wife is from New York City, the concrete jungle. Do you move
> there to join her?

Noooo!
> 
> You are snowmobiling in Yellowstone in winter.  You see a bison break thru
> the ice into the frozen river.  Assume you have a rope.  Do you rescue the
> bison?  A ranger comes by, what do you think the ranger would say?

No.

He'd say, "Shit. Was that a bison?"
> 
> Would you defend your family, even if it meant breaking the law?
> Would you defend your house, when only property and not life was threatened,
> even if it meant breaking the law?
> Would you defend your environment, even if it meant breaking the law?

I'm getting deja vu here.

> 
> You come across a pair of turkeys busyly making sure that there will be
> a new generation of turkeys.  Do you watch quietly, make some noise (so
> that they know you are there) or leave (letting them have some privacy)?
> What if they are human instead of feathered?
> What if the story involved bears|bares instead?

I'd watch the turkeys, leave the people alone. I'd back off slowly for the
bears.

<snip>

> Five guys are crossing a glacier near the Chinese border, a kind of neutral
> strip. They spent 2 months for getting a permit to there - they had to
> convince the Border Guard. Suddenly a military helicopter drops them a
> capsule. Inside is an order to come back. Should they go back =?

Is it a gunship?

<snip>

Sorry. This is way longer than I can stand. G'night.

-- 
yer favorite State Soil Scientist of South Carolina
e-mail address: soilguy[at]cyberstate[dot]infi[dot]net

-- 

Looking for an H-912 (container).

------------ And now a word from our sponsor ------------------
For a quality usenet news server, try DNEWS, easy to install,
fast, efficient and reliable. For home servers or carrier class
installations with millions of users it will allow you to grow!
----  See http://netwinsite.com/sponsor/sponsor_dnews.htm  ----

User Contributions:

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA




Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Part8 - Part9 - Part10 - Part11 - Part12 - Part13 - Part14 - Part15 - Part16 - Part17 - Part18 - Part19 - Part20 - Part21 - Part22 - Part23 - Part24 - Part25 - Part26 - Part27 - Part28

[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index ]

Send corrections/additions to the FAQ Maintainer:
eugene@engate.com (Eugene N. Miya)





Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM