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Win95 FAQ Part 10 of 14: Messaging/Exchange
Section - 10.1 Exchange basics, and why I recommend Exchange for first time E-MAIL users

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Part8 - Part9 - Part10 - Part11 - Part12 - Part13 - Part14 - Single Page )
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Top Document: Win95 FAQ Part 10 of 14: Messaging/Exchange
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Next Document: 10.2. How do I send and receive...
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
   The bloody thing comes with the operating system, for one, so it's
   free!
   
   Exchange acts as a front end for pretty much any mail client, so it
   lets the developers worry about mail delivery, while it worries about
   the interface. Basically, you start with four folders, and all your
   personal mail comes in your Inbox folder. Stuff you send stays in your
   Outbox folder until a "Delivery" happens, either when you select
   "Deliver now" or one of the Exchange clients (such as Internet Mail)
   decides it's time to deliver mail, scheduled in time intervals you can
   control.
   
   Within the Exchange window you can drag messages between folders,
   shared folders if available, or directories in Explorer.
   
   Another big reason: it's interface matches the Windows Explorer so
   closely. You can copy & paste messages between it and other Explorer
   windows. You don't need to learn a whole new interface just to use a
   second, or third mail system.
   
   Yet another big reason: You get all your mail in one place! Internet
   mail, CompuServe mail, faxes, MSN, MS-Mail, and whatever anyone else
   decides to make for it. All big apps that support MAPI (those with a
   "Send Mail..." menu in their File menus), even Win 3.1 apps, work with
   it. Send a Word document to your buddy at nowhere.com, without fussing
   with saving, running your other mail program, and attaching. Exchange
   also stores mail on the user's hard drive or Home directory, so the
   mail server need not be running to view mail.
   
   Many users and developers are just beginning to grasp what Exchange is
   capable of, and most of us make many, many, mistakes, and abandon it
   in favor of "standard" mail apps. Please don't give up; Exchange has
   serious potential, and many of the features you think are missing,
   might just be in there... maybe even improved on!
   

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Top Document: Win95 FAQ Part 10 of 14: Messaging/Exchange
Previous Document: News Headers
Next Document: 10.2. How do I send and receive...

Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Part8 - Part9 - Part10 - Part11 - Part12 - Part13 - Part14 - Single Page

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM