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Artificial Intelligence FAQ: Open Source AI Software 6/6 [Monthly posting]
Section - [6-9a] Speech

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Top Document: Artificial Intelligence FAQ: Open Source AI Software 6/6 [Monthly posting]
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 * The ISIP project at Mississippi State University is a public-domain
   speech-to-text system currently in an Alpha release.  See

      http://www.isip.msstate.edu/projects/speech/

 * CMU's Sphinx system is available from

      http:// www.speech.cs.cmu.edu/sphinx/Sphinx.html

 * RECNET is a complete speech recognition system for the DARPA TIMIT and
   Resource Management tasks.  It uses recurrent networks to estimate phone
   probabilities and Markov models to find the most probable sequence of
   phones or words.  The system is a snapshot of evolving research code.
   There is no documentation other than published research papers.  It is
   configured for the two specific databases and is unlikely to be of use as
   a complete system for other tasks. It is available by anonymous ftp from

      svr-ftp.eng.cam.ac.uk:/misc/recnet-1.3.tar.Z

   Related publications can be found in 

      svr-ftp.eng.cam.ac.uk:/reports/ (see the ABSTRACT file first).

   You will need the relevant CDROMs, 150MByte of free space for TIMIT and
   300MByte for RM. If you use the code, the author would appreciate an
   email message so that he can keep you informed of new releases. Write to
   Tony Robinson, <ajr@eng.cam.ac.uk>, for more information.

 * CELP 3.2a is available from ftp://super.org/pub/
   [192.31.192.1] with copies available on
   ftp://svr-ftp.eng.cam.ac.uk/comp.speech/sources/ The code (C, FORTRAN,
   diskio) all has been built and tested on a Sun4 under SunOS4.1.3.  If
   you want to run it somewhere else, then you may have to do a bit of
   work.  (A Solaris 2.x-compatible release is planned soon.) Written by
   Joe Campbell <jpcampb@afterlife.ncsc.mil> of the Department of
   Defense. Distribution facilitated by Craig F. Reese
   <cfreese@super.org>, IDA/Supercomputing Research Center.

 * The OGI Speech Tools are set of speech data manipulation tools
   developed at the Center for Spoken Language Understanding (CSLU) at
   the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology (Portland
   Oregon). The tools can be used to compute and display signal
   representations, label speech at different levels (e.g., phonetic,
   phonemic and word), train neural network classifiers, and display the
   output of classification or recognition algorithms time-aligned with
   the speech. The OGI Speech Tools were written in ANSI C.  The OGI
   Speech Tools are available by anonymous ftp from

      ftp://speech.cse.ogi.edu/pub/tools/ 

   as ogitools.v1.0.tar.Z. For more information, write to Johan Schalkwyk
   <tools@cse.ogi.edu>. If you're using the tools, please let Johan know
   by sending him a mail message.

 * PC Convolution is a educational software package that graphically
   demonstrates the convolution operation.  It runs on IBM PC compatibles
   using DOS 4.0 or later. A demo version is available by anonymous ftp
   from 

      ftp://ee.umr.edu/pub/ [131.151.4.11]

   as pc_conv.*.  University instructors may obtain a free, fully
   operational version by contacting Dr. Kurt Kosbar <kk@ee.umr.edu> at
   117 Electrical Engineering Building, University of Missouri/Rolla,
   Rolla, Missouri, 65401, phone 314-341-4894.

   http://mambo.ucsc.edu/psl/speech.html

 * Online Speech Synthesizer using the RSYNTH package
      http://www_tios.cs.utwente.nl/say/  (prefered URL)
   Axel.Belinfante@cs.utwente.nl

 * AsTeR (Audio System For Technical Readings) is a computing system that
   orally renders technical documents marked up in LaTeX. An interactive
   demo is accessible via the URL
      http://www.cs.cornell.edu/Info/People/raman/aster/demo.html
   This document presents a collection of math examples rendered in
   audio by AsTeR and in Postscript by LaTeX/DVIPS from the same original
   LaTeX source. A version of the demo that uses inline images can be
   found in the URL
      http://www.cs.cornell.edu/Info/People/raman/aster/aster-toplevel.html
   For more information, write to T.V. Raman <raman@crl.dec.com>,
      http://www.cs.cornell.edu/Info/People/raman/raman.html
   If you download a copy of his thesis, please send him a short email message.

   http://ophale.icp.grenet.fr/esca/esca.html
   [European Speech Communication Association (ESCA)]
   Christian Benoit, <benoit@icp.grenet.fr> or <esca@icp.grenet.fr>

   http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/~jpi/synth/museum.html
   [Examples of speech synthesis from different systems.]
   Jon Iles <j.p.iles@cs.bham.ac.uk> or http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/~jpi/

   http://faculty.washington.edu/~dillon/PhonResources.html
   [Archive of resources for studying speech sounds, primarily English.
   Includes symbols and samples of English phones/phonemes, both
   American and British; tips, tutorials, basic walk-throughs of
   waveform analysis; and examples and links to TTS synthesizers,
   mainly in Europe.]
   George Dillon <dillon@u.washington.edu>


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Top Document: Artificial Intelligence FAQ: Open Source AI Software 6/6 [Monthly posting]
Previous Document: [6-9] Natural Language Processing
Next Document: [6-10] Neural Networks

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