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Win95 FAQ Part 8 of 14: Dial-up Networking
Section - 8.14. How do I set up a dial-up server?

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Top Document: Win95 FAQ Part 8 of 14: Dial-up Networking
Previous Document: 8.13. How do I write a dial-up script?
Next Document: 8.15. Top ten Internet/dial-up mistakes
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
   Install MS Plus or DUN 1.3. It will add a new Dial-up server...
   menu to the Dial-up networking window. The Win95 dial-up server is
   really a NetBIOS router, meaning it doesn't actually perform WAN
   routing of a low level protocol (though they did hack IPX routing in
   there for NetWare clients).
   
   In Dial-up Networking, you have a new menu: Connections/Dial-Up
   Server. You can choose ONE modem to receive calls on (Not more than
   one, sorry), and you can pick what kind of dial up server it is
   (either PPP, WFWG RAS, or Default, which allows for both). You can
   also enter a dial up password, or pick users from a user list if you
   have User Level security enabled.
   
   It does appear that you CAN select more than one modem to let the
   Dial-up Server answer, but when it answers one it refuses to answer on
   the other. This is the limit of Win95's dial-up server capabilities.
   
   Now I wrote above that it's a NetBIOS router. That means it's designed
   to route MS Network style traffic to a network. Normally, a dial-up
   client will have Client for MS networks and NetBEUI installed (or for
   WFWG clients, they just use the Remote Access software included),
   because NetBEUI's the fastest NetBIOS compatible protocol for slow
   links. NetBEUI isn't route-able, but that doesn't matter; the network
   itself could use IPX or TCP/IP instead, as long as it's an MS Windows
   style network.

     * 8.14.1. ...for NetWare dial-in? 
       
   NetWare dial-in works too, because Microsoft hacked a simple IPX
   router in there. To do NetWare dial-up access, make sure you install
   IPX protocol and bind it to the Dial-up Adapter in Network Control
   Panel. The clients can be Win95 or Windows NT clients, but they need
   to have IPX protocol and Client for NetWare installed. When the user
   dials in, a NetWare login prompt will come up, login scripts will
   execute, and connections will appear.
   
   WARNING: IPX over PPP is quite slow! Some tips for the client, to
   speed up performance:
     * Allow only IPX protocol for dial-out to the dial-up server (turn
       NetBEUI and TCP/IP OFF in Server Type)
     * Keep local copies of MAP.EXE and CAPTURE.EXE on the remote
       computer, in the WINDOWS\COMMAND directory
     * Turn Software Compression ON
     * Pick a frame type in IPX properties (Don't use Auto-Detect)
     * Don't run NetBIOS apps over the dial-up connection through IPX
         * 8.14.2. Top five reasons to use a Win95 machine as a dial-up
       server 
       
   5. Cheap NetWare dial-in access (A LOT cheaper than NetWare Connect!)
   
   4. Cheap Windows Network dial-in access
   
   3. Effortless (almost) connection to your network from home
   
   2. Works with non-Win95 MS Network clients (like an Amiga using
   SAMBA!)
   
   1. User-Level security works here (Not like NT RAS Server)

     * 8.14.3. Top ten misconceptions about Win95 dial-up servers 
       
   10. Fast connection speeds (NOT!)
   
   9. It routes TCP/IP (This is a Resource Kit error.)
   
   8. It does MS-Mail Remote (Sorry, it doesn't)
   
   7. It routes NetBEUI (It's a NetBIOS router; NetBEUI isn't route-able)
   
   6. You need NetBEUI on the net card to route (It's a NetBIOS router;
   it doesn't matter)
   
   5. You need NetBEUI on the Dial-up Adapter to use it (It's faster, but
   it doesn't matter)
   
   4. It won't work with non-Win95 dial-up clients (Bull... I've used my
   Amiga to dial in! Couldn't transfer any files though...)
   
   3. It doesn't work with null modem cables (check out this bogus
   modem.inf file if you want to use a null modem)
   
   2. It's a security risk to my network! (Geez, you can disable the
   dial-up server in system policies for the default computer, then
   enable it for the computers you want it to work on.)
   
   1. It doesn't work. (I think this was a vicious rumor spread by some
   OS/2 advocates.)
   

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Top Document: Win95 FAQ Part 8 of 14: Dial-up Networking
Previous Document: 8.13. How do I write a dial-up script?
Next Document: 8.15. Top ten Internet/dial-up mistakes

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM