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Win95 FAQ Part 7 of 14: Networking
Section - 7.3. How do I share my hard drive or printer to...

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Top Document: Win95 FAQ Part 7 of 14: Networking
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     * 7.3.1. ...other Win95 users? 
       
   Install File & Print Sharing for MS networks in your network setup. If
   you set up the computer like I told you back in the How do I
   connect to other Win95 computers? section, this'll already be done.
   
   Next, right-click on any drive or folder you want to share, and select
   the "Sharing" menu. You can specify a read-only or full access share
   like you could in Windows for Workgroups, or make it dependent on
   password.

     * 7.3.1.1. ...on The Internet? 
       
   This is pretty tricky because you need to run NetBIOS over TCP/IP. You
   can't just type "\\206.116.13.2" and expect a list of shared resources
   to appear. Running NetBIOS over TCP/IP usually requires a WINS server,
   but you can also do NetBIOS naming through DNS, or by manually writing
   an LMHOSTS file, neither of which I recommend.
   
   One problem I noticed is, if you specify a name in HOSTS or LMHOSTS,
   the machine you're referring to had to have the same name in its
   Identification tab, on its Network Properties. This tidbit I got from
   Rich Graves' site.
   
   Your easiest bet is to obtain a free FTP server for Win95, available
   at www.windows95.com. Then the other user can just use their FTP
   client or browse using their web browser, using "ftp://206.116.13.2"
   as the URL. To find out what your IP address is (if you have IP
   addresses assigned to you on the fly), run WINIPCFG.EXE from the Win95
   directory and bring up properties of the "PPP Adapter", while you're
   connected.
   
   NOTE: I've been asked to include Winserve's public WINS servers in
   this category. Problem is, I don't like the notion of running MS
   networking across the Internet because of the inherent security risks.
   At least someone running an FTP server knows they're sharing over the
   Internet, whereas someone who happens to have the full suite of MS
   networking might not.

     * 7.3.2. ...other Windows for Workgroups users? 
       
   Just like you would for Win95 users. Be careful if you use User
   Level security, because WFWG clients won't recognize weird security
   providers, like NetWare servers. Either share out to "The World", or
   specify a Windows NT domain as your security provider, and have the
   WFWG client log into it. Or, simply use Share Level security a'la
   WFWG.
   
   NOTE: If you chose IPX as your base protocol between Win95 and WFWG
   computers, you should decide if you want to use NetBIOS or not,
   because WFWG has one default (NetBIOS ON) and Win95 has another
   default (NetBIOS OFF). Neither WFWG nor Win95 need NetBIOS over IPX
   unless you're specifically running NetBIOS apps, so on the Win95
   machine have "I want to enable NetBIOS" turned off in IPX properties,
   and change the protocol on the WFWG machines to "IPX/SPX Transport"
   instead of "IPX/SPX Transport with NetBIOS". Microsoft calls this
   "Direct Hosting over IPX" which will give you a speed boost. Windows
   NT and Workgroup Connection for DOS also support Direct Hosting over
   IPX.

     * 7.3.3. ...Macintosh (TM) users? 
       
   Miramar Systems will include an AFP and ASDP print service with
   their MacLAN product, which they plan to release in June 1996. (So
   where is it, now that it's February 1997?) In the meantime, they
   managed to hack in their Win 3.1 Personal MacLAN into Win95.
   
   COPSTALK is another AFP service, with the difference that it's a
   "true" Win95 service.
   
   Thursby Systems released a Client for MS Networks for the
   Macintosh, which works like any other MS client over MacTCP or Open
   Transport TCP/IP. This avoids needing special software on the Win95
   machine and simplifies administering a network of PCs and Macs where
   NT Servers reign.

     * 7.3.4. ...other computers' users? (SAMBA network clients) 
       
   MS Windows Network has a short name: SMB, or "Server Message Blocks".
   SAMBA is a GNU public-license SMB client for UNIX machines, with
   versions available for The Amiga and several other smaller systems.
   Visit one of many SAMBA FAQs, or visit the newsgroup
   comp.protocols.smb, or if you want to connect to Amigas, visit
   AMINET.
   
   Download the latest SAMBA for Amiga from any Aminet mirror and use
   SMBCLIENT on the Amiga to connect to Win95 machines.
   
   Linux users can mount Win95 shares as remote file systems; it comes
   with a complete SMB client (SMBFILE).
   
   SAMBA clients exploit a nasty file sharing bug in Win95 and WFWG; if
   the Win95 server shared out a directory, it will inadvertently share
   the entire hard drive with the same restrictions! Ack! Microsoft fixed
   this in Service Pack 1.
   

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Top Document: Win95 FAQ Part 7 of 14: Networking
Previous Document: 7.2. How do I connect to...
Next Document: 7.4. How do I run DOS TCP/IP or packet-driver apps in DOS sessions?

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM