Search the FAQ Archives

3 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M
N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z
faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives

Comp.os.research: Frequently answered questions [1/3: l/m 13 Aug 1996]
Section - [5.3] Do any texts cover the implementation of specific operating systems?

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Single Page )
[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index | Forum ]


Top Document: Comp.os.research: Frequently answered questions [1/3: l/m 13 Aug 1996]
Previous Document: [5.2] Graduate-level texts
Next Document: [5.4] What instructional operating systems can I use?
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
From: Operating systems teaching

Some books commonly used in conjunction with the texts listed above
are:

- `The Design and Implementation of the 4.3BSD Unix Operating System',
  Samuel Leffler, Kirk McKusick, Michael Karels, John Quarterman,
  1989, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-06196-1.  This book describes the
  kernel of 4.3BSD Unix in some detail, covering process and memory
  management (the latter being heavily VAX-oriented), file system
  organisation, device driver internals, terminal handling, IPC,
  network communications, some details of the Internet protocols, and
  system operation.  I found this book to be well-written and concise.

  Accompanying the above is the `4.3BSD Answer Book', Samuel Leffler,
  Kirk McKusick, 1991, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-54629-9.  This short
  book provides answers to all of the exercises found at the end of
  each chapter in the daemon book.

- `The Design of the Unix Operating System', Maurice Bach, 1986,
  Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-201757-1.  This is the authoritative
  description of the internals of System V Release 2 Unix.  Due to
  copyright restrictions, it contains no actual code, but rather
  pseudo-code (I didn't find this to be a problem).  Topics covered
  include file system internals, process control and scheduling,
  memory management, IPC, and device driver architecture.  Coverage of
  mutliprocessor and distributed Unix systems is dated, but this
  remains a classic operating systems text.

- `The Magic Garden Explained: The Internals of Unix System V Release
  4', Berny Goodheart, James Cox, 1994, Prentice Hall, ISBN
  0-13-098138-9.  This books covers the workings of SVR4 in
  substantial detail; it is more detailed than either of the above
  texts, and appears to be of very high quality.  While the authors
  recommend the book be read in parallel with study of the original
  Unix source code, sufficient pseudocode representation of the key
  algorithms has been included to permit a more or less detailed study
  without restricted access to the original source code.

- `Unix Internals: The New Frontiers', Uresh Vahalia, 1995, Prentice
  Hall, ISBN 0-13-101908-2.  This is quite simply a wonderful book.
  The broad issues it covers include threads and lightweight
  processes, and how they interact; signal implementations, process
  group and session management; process scheduling; IPC; kernel
  synchronisation and multiprocessor architectures; local and
  distributed filesystems; kernel memory management; and device driver
  architectures.  Each topic is accompanied by details of its
  implementation under modern Unix variants such as Solaris 2.x,
  SVR4.2, and 4.4BSD, and its treatment by the Mach kernel.  The
  writing style is concise and pleasant, and the treatment of each
  topic is satisfyingly thorough and clear.  If you are interested in
  the implementation of Unix or other operating systems, this book is
  a "must have".

- `Unix Systems for Modern Architectures: Caching and Symmetric
  Multiprocessing for Kernel Programmers', Curt Schimmel, 1995,
  Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-63338-8.  Covers in extensive detail the
  operation of caches and symmetric multiprocessors, how they
  interact, and the issues operating systems must address in order to
  make effective use of them.  Issues addressed include the management
  of virtually- and physically-tagged caches on uniprocessors,
  synchronisation and mutual exclusion techniques for multiprocessors,
  standard multiprocessor kernel architectures, and multiprocessor
  cache coherency.  This book is written in a clear manner, and
  illustrated effectively.  Each chapter ends with lists of exercises
  and references.  My copy contains a number of typographical errors,
  but I am told that later printings have addressed this issue.

I am not aware of any similar book which covers the implementation of
a distributed system.

User Contributions:

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA




Top Document: Comp.os.research: Frequently answered questions [1/3: l/m 13 Aug 1996]
Previous Document: [5.2] Graduate-level texts
Next Document: [5.4] What instructional operating systems can I use?

Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Single Page

[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index ]

Send corrections/additions to the FAQ Maintainer:
os-faq@cse.ucsc.edu





Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM