Search the FAQ Archives

3 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M
N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z
faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives

Irish FAQ: Irish Names [9/10]
Section - 2) How do you pronounce that?

( Part00 - Part01 - Part02 - Part03 - Part04 - Part05 - Part06 - Part07 - Part08 - Part09 - Single Page )
[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index | Business Photos and Profiles ]


Top Document: Irish FAQ: Irish Names [9/10]
Previous Document: 1) Does anyone have a list of Irish first names?
Next Document: 3) Are there any books of Irish names?
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
	You may have noticed that there's a fair bit of duplication
	above.  There are anglicised spellings, Irish spellings and
	slight variations of the same name, even in the modern Irish
	spelling.  Some of the variations are probably regional.  This
	guide is, needless to say, incomplete and may contain serious
	mistakes.

	Here are approximate transiliterations for the letters that
	don't exist in English.  The slash above the letter is called a
	fada in Irish, meaning long, because it lengthens the vowel).

	á  =  aw - awe, crawl  (a - flat in Ulster)
	é  =  ay - hay, bray
	í  =  ee - feed, creep
	ó  =  o  - owe, flow
	ú  =  oo - cool, fool (more like the French word for "where")

	Some of the consonants are pronounced differently.

	s  =  sh (when it is in the stressed syllable)
	bh =  v
	dh =  g
	mh =  w
	th = h

	Note that the letters j,k,q,v,w,x,y,z do not occur in Irish.
	The letter c is always pronounced hard, as in cow, never soft
	as in cigarette.

	Irish spelling insists on grouping "fat" vowels and "thin"
	vowels when they are separated by a consonant.  The fat vowels
	are a, o and u.  The thin vowels are e and i.  So if a word
	would have a fat vowel followed by a consonant (or several)
	followed by a thin vowel breaks the rule:  a vowel must be
	inserted to balance the spelling.  Thus "Osín" is wrong; it must
	be "Oisín"; "Sibhán" must be turned into "Siobhán".  The
	extra letter is generally silent.


User Contributions:

Ivan Brookes
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 21, 2011 @ 8:08 am
I'm looking for information regarding navigable waterways for a 44' fly bridge cruiser for corporate entertainment such as the big horse racing events. I've searched the internet and book stores here in Walws without success.

Regards
Ivan Brookes

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA




Top Document: Irish FAQ: Irish Names [9/10]
Previous Document: 1) Does anyone have a list of Irish first names?
Next Document: 3) Are there any books of Irish names?

Part00 - Part01 - Part02 - Part03 - Part04 - Part05 - Part06 - Part07 - Part08 - Part09 - Single Page

[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index ]

Send corrections/additions to the FAQ Maintainer:
irish-faq@pobox.com (Irish FAQ Maintainer)





Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM