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Irish FAQ: The Irish Language [3/10]

( Part00 - Part01 - Part02 - Part03 - Part04 - Part05 - Part06 - Part07 - Part08 - Part09 - MultiPage )
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Archive-name: cultures/irish-faq/part03
Last-modified: 7 Oct 99
Posting-Frequency: monthly
URL: http://www.enteract.com/~cpm/irish-faq/

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
Part three of ten.


Frequently Asked Questions on soc.culture.irish with answers.
Send corrections, suggestions, additions, and other feedback
to <irish-faq@pobox.com>

The Irish Language

1) What kind of language is Irish?
2) Tell me about introductory Courses to the Irish language.
3) Where can I learn Irish abroad (or online)?
4) What summer courses in Irish Gaelic are there?
5) Do you know of any Irish language Cassette tapes?
6) What bookstores in the States have Irish books?
7) What is the name of the pin worn by fluent Irish speakers?
8) Where can I find computer terms in Irish?
9) Are there any Irish speakers on-line?
10) What do all these Irish place names really mean?
11) How do you say "kiss my ass" in Irish?



Subject: 1) What kind of language is Irish? Irish is a language related to Scots Gaelic, Breton and Welsh amongst others. All belong the Celtic family, which is part of the Indo-European group of languages. (Irish is part of the "Q-Celtic" group of languages, with Scots Gaelic and Manx. Welsh, Cornish and Breton belong to the "P-Celtic" branch.) Here are a few samples to whet your appetite. Note that even greetings vary between the dialects. Dia duit (Lit. God to you) Dia is Muire duit (Lit. God and Mary to you) Go mbeannaí Dia duit May God bless you Go mbeannaí Dia is Muire duit May God and Mary bless you Bail ó Dhia ort The blessing of God on you Bail ó Dhia is Muire duit The blessing of God and Mary on you Go raibh maith agat Thanks (Lit. May there be good at you) Go dtaga do ríocht May thy kingdom come Nár laga Dia do lámh May God not weaken your hand Gura slán an scéalaí May the bearer of the news be safe Gurab amhlaidh duit The same to you Tá fáilte romhat You are welcome Cad é (Goidé) mar tá tú? How are you? (Tír Chonaill) Cén chaoi 'bhfuil tú? How are you (Connacht) Conas atá tu? How are you? (Mumhan) Tá mé go maith I'm doing well An bhfuil aon rud úr ag dul? What's new? Aon scéal 'ad? What's new? (Connacht) Slán leat Good Bye (said to one going) Slán agat Good Bye (said to one remaining) Sláinte chugat Good health to you Gabhaim pardún agat I beg your pardon Gabh mo leithscéal Pardon me (Lit. Accept my excuse) Más é do thoil é If you please Le do thoil Please Breithlá shona duit Happy birthday to you Saol fada chugat Long life to you For the following greetings Gorab amhlaidh duit is a common answer: Oíche mhaith duit Good night Codladh sámh duit A pleasant sleep Nollaig shona duit Happy Christmas Nollaig faoi shéan is faoi A prosperous and pleasant mhaise duit Christmas Athbhliain faoi mhaise duit A prosperous New Year Terms of Endearment a ghrá a rún a stór a thaisce a chroí a chuisle my dear darling/love/treasure muirnín leannán céadsearc sweetheart a ghrá mo chroí love of my heart! Ta grá agam duit. I love you. Curses Imeacht gan teacht ort May you leave without returning Titim gan éirí ort May you fall without rising Fán fada ort Long travels to you Go n-ithe an cat thú is go n-ithe an diabhal an cat May the cat eat you, and may the cat be eaten by the devil
Subject: 2) Tell me about introductory Courses to the Irish language. NOTE: Additional information is available in the file RPAYNE1 TYIG via the LISTSERV@LISTSERV.HEA.IE with command GET RPAYNE1 TYIG Údar : Mícheál Ó Siadhail Teideal : LEARNING IRISH Foilsitheoir : Yale University Press -New Haven and London ISBN : 0-300-04224-8 For the accompanying tape set (four cassettes); Teideal : LEARNING IRISH CASSETTES ISBN : 0-300-04340-6 NOTE: Irish lessons to be used with above texts are available in the file IGSTENS1 TYIG via the LISTSERV@LISTSERV.HEA.IE with the command GET IGSTENS1 TYIG As a learner, you might consider a set of cassettes and booklet titled BUNTÚS CAINTE. They come in three levels. This is convenient as you don't have to purchase all three at once. It is recommended that you use BUNTÚS CAINTE for pronunciation in combination with PROGRESS IN IRISH. Údar : T. Ó Domhnallain Teideal : BUNTÚS CAINTE Vol.(1, 2, or 3) Book and Cassettes ISBN : X50153, X50154, X50155 Údar : Máiréad Ní Ghráda Teideal : PROGRESS IN IRISH ISBN : X71212 Conradh na Gaelige (The Gaelic League) welcomes all who are interested in learning/preserving Irish. They can be contacted at the following addresses. 12 Sillogue Rd. Dublin 11 Ireland Phone: +353-1-842-9372 6 Sráid Fhearchair Dublin 2 Ireland Phone: +353-1-475-7401, [book shop +353-1-478-3814] Gaelic League Pittsburgh Branch P. O. Box 97742 Pittsburgh, PA 15227-0142
Subject: 3) Where can I learn Irish abroad (or online)? There's a list of Irish courses in other countries at Ceantar (http://www.ceantar.org/ATM/). Neil McEwan has written some lessons that may be a useful start (http://www.wwa.com/~abardubh/lessons/). You can find more Irish related links at Sabhal Mór Ostaig (http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/gaeilge.html), the Trinity College BESS department (http://www.bess.tcd.ie/gaeilge.htm) and Trinity College Maths department (http://www.maths.tcd.ie/gaeilge/).
Subject: 4) What summer courses in Irish Gaelic are there? Note: Additional information is available in the file IGSGUSA CLAS via the LISTSERV@LISTSERV.HEA.IE with the command GET IGSGUSA CLAS Information concerning courses in spoken Irish (for adult learners) is available from the contact numbers given below. If you are thinking of visiting Ireland this summer, you might consider building into your holiday plans one of these short, intensive courses in Irish Gaelic. Here are three snail mail addresses to write to for info on those summer courses for different dialects of Gaelic: (a) Gaeilge Chúige Uladh: if you wish to learn Ulster Irish. Seoladh(address): Oideas Gael, Gleann Cholm Cille, Contae Thír Chonaill, Éire(Ireland) Fón: +353-1-213566 or +353-73-3005 (b) Gaeilge Chúige Chonnacht: if you wish to learn Connacht Irish. Seoladh(address): Áras Mháirtín Uí Chadhain, An Cheathrú Rua, Contae na Gaillimhe, Éire(Ireland) Fón: +353-91-95101 (c) Gaeilge Chúige Mumhan: if you wish to learn Munster Irish. Seoladh(address): Oidhreacht Chorca Dhuibhne, Baile an Fheirtéaraigh, Contae Chiarraí, Éire(Ireland) Fón: +353-66-56100
Subject: 5) Do you know of any Irish language Cassette tapes? Here is a list of audio tapes (excluding music) available from... Book Distribution Center 31 Fenian Street Dublin 2 Ireland Prices are in Irish pounds but do not include postage (which can be considerable for air mail orders). If you wish to order any of this material you should first write, phone (Dublin 616522), or fax (Dublin 616564), for a price that includes surface or air postage. Note: In Ireland VAT (value added tax) does not apply to books, but does apply to tapes. However if you live outside the EU (European Union) you are exempt from VAT. Am Scéalaíochta I Stories for young children: Sicín Licín; Na Trí Bhéar Book and Tape £3.99 Am Scéalaíochta II Stories for young children: Na Trí Mhuc Bheaga An Circín Beag Rua Book and Tape £3.99 Foclóir Póca - Caiséad Phonetic Tape prepared to accompany Foclóir Póca, an English-Irish/Irish-English dictionary of the synthetic Standard Irish dialect £4.00 Íosagán & Scéalta Eile. Collection of short stories by Pádraig Pearse. £4.87 + vat These stories are also available in print as "Short Stories of Pádraig Pearse" which can be obtained for £4.95 Uair An Chloig Cois Teallaigh - AN HOUR BY THE HEARTH Dual Language Book and Tape compendium of folk stories £10.00 Educational Services Teaching Cassettes Irish/Gaelige. Two cassettes with a small phrase dictionary. Educational Services Corporation 1725 K St., N.W., Suite 408 Washington, D.C. 20006 +1-(202) 298-8424 Review: This is a conversation course with minimal grammar (next to none). I'm finding it very useful to start off with, as it teaches phrases, which give me a useable foothold with the language, and it repeats the Gaelic twice after the English is spoken.
Subject: 6) What bookstores in the States have Irish books? Note: Additional information is available in the files IGJTM1 BIBL and IGJTM2 BIBL via the LISTSERV@LISTSERV.HEA.IE with the commands GET IGJTM1 BIBL GET IGJTM2 BIBL Name: Irish Books Address: 580 Broadway, Room 1103, New York, New York 10012, USA Phone: (212) 274-1923 Name: Schoenhof's Foreign Books Address: 76A Mount Auburn Street Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA Phone: (617) 547 - 8855 Fax: (617) 547 - 8551 Or you could try one of the Irish bookshops on the Internet.
Subject: 7) What is the name of the pin worn by fluent Irish speakers? It's a fáinne, pronounced roughly "fawn-ye".
Subject: 8) Where can I find computer terms in Irish? You'll find Irish computer terms (such as "líon domhanda" for "world wide web") at Sabhal Mór Ostaig (http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/tearm_riomh.html).
Subject: 9) Are there any Irish speakers on-line? You'll find them on the Gaeilge-A and Gaeilge-B mailing lists. Gaeilge-A is for fluent speakers, Gaeilge-B for learners. To subscribe to Gaeilge-B, send a mail message to listserv@danann.hea.ie with the following command in the text of the message SUBSCRIBE Gaeilge-B Your-firstname Your-surname (If your name was "Joe Sixpack", this would be written as "SUBSCRIBE Gaeilge-B Joe Sixpack".) To subscribe to Gaeilge-A, use the same command as above, but put "Gaeilge-A" instead of "Gaeilge-B" There _are_ Irish speakers on soc.culture.irish as well.
Subject: 10) What do all these Irish place names really mean? These web sites may be helpful. http://www.loughman.dna.ie/general/placenames.html http://www.exis.net/ahd/monaghan/irishplacenames.htm http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/R_G_Boyd/IrishPlaces.htm
Subject: 11) How do you say "kiss my ass" in Irish? Póg mo thóin. ------------------------------ End of Irish FAQ part 3 ***********************

User Contributions:

Ivan Brookes
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 21, 2011 @ 8:08 am
I'm looking for information regarding navigable waterways for a 44' fly bridge cruiser for corporate entertainment such as the big horse racing events. I've searched the internet and book stores here in Walws without success.

Regards
Ivan Brookes

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