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RFC 4388 - Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Leasequery


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Network Working Group                                          R. Woundy
Request for Comments: 4388                                 Comcast Cable
Category: Standards Track                                     K. Kinnear
                                                           Cisco Systems
                                                           February 2006

         Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Leasequery

Status of This Memo

   This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
   Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
   Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
   and status of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2006).

Abstract

   A Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol version 4 (DHCPv4) server is
   the authoritative source of IP addresses that it has provided to
   DHCPv4 clients.  Other processes and devices that already make use of
   DHCPv4 may need to access this information.  The leasequery protocol
   provides these processes and devices a lightweight way to access IP
   address information.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................2
   2. Terminology .....................................................5
   3. Background ......................................................7
   4. Design Goals ....................................................7
      4.1. Broadcast ARP Is Undesirable ...............................7
      4.2. SNMP and LDAP Are Not Appropriate ..........................8
      4.3. DHCP Relay Agent Functionality Is Common ...................8
      4.4. DHCP Servers Are a Reliable Source of Location
           Information ................................................9
      4.5. Minimal Additional Configuration Is Required ...............9
   5. Protocol Overview ...............................................9
   6. Protocol Details ...............................................12
      6.1. Definitions Required for DHCPLEASEQUERY Processing ........12
      6.2. Sending the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message ........................14
      6.3. Receiving the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message ......................15
      6.4. Responding to the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message ..................16
      6.5. Receiving a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or
           DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN Message ..................................20
      6.6. Receiving No Response to the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message .......21
      6.7. Lease Binding Data Storage Requirements ...................22
      6.8. Using the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message with Multiple
           DHCP Servers ..............................................23
   7. Security Considerations ........................................23
   8. IANA Considerations ............................................24
   9. Acknowledgements ...............................................24
   10. References ....................................................25
      10.1. Normative References .....................................25
      10.2. Informative References ...................................25

1.  Introduction

   A DHCPv4 server contains considerable authoritative information
   concerning the IP addresses it has leased to DHCP clients.  Sometimes
   devices or other processes may need access to this information.  In
   some cases, these devices or processes already have the capability to
   send and receive DHCP packets, and so the leasequery protocol is
   designed to give these processes and devices a low-overhead way to
   access such information.

   For example, access concentrators that act as DHCP relay agents
   sometimes derive information important to their operation by
   extracting data out of the DHCP packets they forward, a process known
   as "gleaning".  Unfortunately, the typical access concentrator loses
   its gleaned information when the access concentrator is rebooted or
   is replaced.  This memo proposes that when gleaned DHCP information
   is not available, the access concentrator/relay agent can obtain the

   location information directly from the DHCP server(s) using the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

   To continue this example in more depth, in many broadband access
   networks, the access concentrator needs to associate an IP address
   lease to the correct endpoint location, which includes knowledge of
   the host hardware address, the port or virtual circuit that leads to
   the host, and/or the hardware address of the intervening subscriber
   modem.  This is particularly important when one or more IP subnets
   are shared among many ports, circuits, and modems.  Representative
   cable and DSL environments are depicted in Figures 1 and 2 below.

           +--------+     +---------------+
           |  DHCP  |     |  DOCSIS CMTS  |
           | Server |-...-|  or DVB INA   |-------------------
           +--------+     | (Relay Agent) |      |          |
                          +---------------+  +------+    +------+
                                             |Modem1|    |Modem2|
                                             +------+    +------+
                                                |         |    |
                                            +-----+  +-----+ +-----+
                                            |Host1|  |Host2| |Host3|
                                            +-----+  +-----+ +-----+

               Figure 1: Cable Environment for DHCPLEASEQUERY

           +--------+     +---------------+
           |  DHCP  |     |  DSL Access   |     +-------+
           | Server |-...-| Concentrator  |-...-| DSLAM |
           +--------+     | (Relay Agent) |     +-------+
                          +---------------+      |     |
                                           +------+   +------+
                                           |Modem1|   |Modem2|
                                           +------+   +------+
                                              |        |    |
                                          +-----+  +-----+ +-----+
                                          |Host1|  |Host2| |Host3|
                                          +-----+  +-----+ +-----+

               Figure 2: DSL Environment for DHCPLEASEQUERY

   Knowledge of this location information can benefit the access
   concentrator in several ways:

      1.  The access concentrator can forward traffic to the access
          network using the correct access network port, down the
          correct virtual circuit, through the correct modem, to the
          correct hardware address.

      2.  The access concentrator can perform IP source address
          verification of datagrams received from the access network.
          The verification may be based on the datagram source hardware
          address, the incoming access network port, the incoming
          virtual circuit, and/or the transmitting modem.

      3.  The access concentrator can encrypt datagrams that can only be
          decrypted by the correct modem, using mechanisms such as [BPI]
          or [BPI+].

   The access concentrator in this example obtains the location
   information primarily from "gleaning" information from DHCP server
   responses sent through the relay agent.  When location information is
   not available from "gleaning", e.g., because the access concentrator
   has rebooted, the access concentrator can query the DHCP server(s)
   for location information using the DHCPLEASEQUERY message defined in
   this document.

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message is a new DHCP message type transmitted
   from a DHCP relay agent to a DHCP server.  A DHCPLEASEQUERY-aware
   relay agent sends the DHCPLEASEQUERY message when it needs to know
   the location of an IP endpoint.  The DHCPLEASEQUERY-aware DHCP server
   replies with a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or
   DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message.  The DHCPLEASEACTIVE response to a
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message allows the relay agent to determine the IP
   endpoint location and the remaining duration of the IP address lease.
   The DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED is similar to a DHCPLEASEACTIVE message, but
   indicates that there is no currently active lease on the resultant IP
   address but that this DHCP server is authoritative for this IP
   address.  The DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message indicates that the DHCP server
   has no knowledge of the information specified in the query (e.g., IP
   address, MAC address, or Client-identifier option).

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message does not presuppose a particular use for
   the information it returns -- it is simply designed to return
   information for which the DHCP server is an authoritative source to a
   client that requests that information.  It is designed to make it
   straightforward for processes and devices that already interpret DHCP
   packets to access information from the DHCP server.

   This document specifies an extension specifically to the DHCPv4
   protocol [RFC2131].  Given the nature of the DHCPv6 protocol
   [RFC3315], there is no effective way to make the DHCPLEASEQUERY
   message interaction common between DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 even should the
   desire to do so exist.

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message was the result of a set of specific real-
   world implementation needs that appeared many years after the DHCPv4
   protocol was in wide use.  Furthermore, at the time of this writing,
   the DHCPv6 protocol has yet to be widely deployed.  The needs of
   access concentrators in yet to be determined DHCPv6 deployment
   scenarios are difficult to estimate.  If a DHCPLEASEQUERY-like
   function is necessary in DHCPv6, many of the ideas of this document
   will probably be applicable, while others may not.  We have been
   cautioned against designing protocol capabilities for which there is
   only an imagined consumer, and that is all that exists today in the
   realm of DHCPLEASEQUERY for DHCPv6.

   Thus, this document applies only to DHCPv4, and for clarity we have
   not appended DHCPv4 to every appearance of several common terms.  In
   this document, all references to IP addresses should be taken to mean
   IPv4 addresses, and all references to DHCP servers and DHCP clients
   should be taken to mean DHCPv4 servers and DHCPv4 clients.

2.  Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

   This document uses the following terms:

        o "access concentrator"

          An access concentrator is a router or switch at the broadband
          access provider's edge of a public broadband access network.
          This document assumes that the access concentrator includes
          the DHCP relay agent functionality.

        o "DHCP client"

          A DHCP client is an Internet host using DHCP to obtain
          configuration parameters such as a network address.

        o "DHCP relay agent"

          A DHCP relay agent is a third-party agent that transfers
          Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) and DHCP messages between clients
          and servers residing on different subnets, per [RFC951] and
          [RFC1542].

        o "DHCP server"

          A DHCP server is an Internet host that returns configuration
          parameters to DHCP clients.

        o "downstream"

          Downstream is the direction from the access concentrator
          towards the broadband subscriber.

        o "gleaning"

          Gleaning is the extraction of location information from DHCP
          messages, as the messages are forwarded by the DHCP relay
          agent function.

        o "location information"

          Location information is information needed by the access
          concentrator to forward traffic to a broadband-accessible
          host.  This information includes knowledge of the host
          hardware address, the port or virtual circuit that leads to
          the host, and/or the hardware address of the intervening
          subscriber modem.

        o "MAC address"

          In the context of a DHCP packet, a MAC address consists of the
          following fields: hardware type "htype", hardware length
          "hlen", and client hardware address "chaddr".

        o "stable storage"

          Every DHCP server is assumed to have some form of what is
          called "stable storage".  Stable storage is used to hold
          information concerning IP address bindings (among other
          things) so that this information is not lost in the event of a
          server failure that requires restart of the server.

        o "upstream"

          Upstream is the direction from the broadband subscriber
          towards the access concentrator.

3.  Background

   The focus of this document is to enable processes and devices that
   wish to access information from the DHCP server in a lightweight and
   convenient manner.  It is especially appropriate for processes and
   devices that already interpret DHCP packets.

   One important motivating example is that the DHCPLEASEQUERY message
   allows access concentrators to send DHCPLEASEQUERY messages to DHCP
   servers to obtain location information of broadband access network
   devices.

   This document assumes that many access concentrators have an embedded
   DHCP relay agent functionality.  Typical access concentrators include
   DOCSIS Cable Modem Termination Systems (CMTSs) [DOCSIS], DVB
   Interactive Network Adapters (INAs) [EUROMODEM], and DSL Access
   Concentrators.

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message is an extension to the DHCP protocol
   [RFC2131].

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message is a query message only and does not
   affect the state of the IP address or the binding information
   associated with it.

4.  Design Goals

   The goal of this document is to provide a lightweight mechanism for
   processes or devices to access information contained in the DHCP
   server.  It is designed to allow processes and devices that already
   process and interpret DHCP messages to access this information in a
   rapid and lightweight manner.

   Some of this information might be acquired in a different way, and
   the following sections discuss some of these alternative approaches.

4.1.  Broadcast ARP Is Undesirable

   The access concentrator can transmit a broadcast Address Resolution
   Protocol (ARP) Request [RFC826], and observe the origin and contents
   of the ARP Reply, to reconstruct the location information.

   The ARP mechanism is undesirable for three reasons:

      1.  the burden on the access concentrator to transmit over
          multiple access ports and virtual circuits (assuming that IP
          subnets span multiple ports or virtual circuits),

      2.  the burden on the numerous subscriber hosts to receive and
          process the broadcast, and

      3.  the ease by which a malicious host can misrepresent itself as
          the IP endpoint.

4.2.  SNMP and LDAP Are Not Appropriate

   Access concentrator implementations typically do not have Simple
   Network Management Protocol (SNMP) management client interfaces nor
   Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) client interfaces
   (although they typically do include SNMP management agents).  This is
   one reason why this document does not leverage the proposed DHCP
   Server MIB [DHCPMIB].

   The DHCP Server MIB effort [DHCPMIB] grew out of traffic engineering
   and troubleshooting activities at large DHCP installations, and is
   primarily intended as a method of gathering performance statistics
   about servers the load presented to them.

   Despite the presence in the proposed DHCPv4 server MIB of objects
   that report configuration and status information, the MIB is intended
   to provide more generic, server-wide aggregated or summarized data.
   DHCPLEASEQUERY is intended to provide detailed, specific information
   about individual leases at a level that would be difficult or
   impossible to shoehorn into a MIB.

   From an implementation standpoint, the DHCPLEASEQUERY message is not
   required to be supported by all DHCPv4 servers.  Since it appears
   that defining optional MIB objects and objects for optional features
   in a MIB is discouraged, trying to support DHCPLEASEQUERY
   functionality optionally through a MIB would be similarly discouraged
   from an SNMP MIB standpoint.

4.3.  DHCP Relay Agent Functionality Is Common

   Access concentrators commonly act as DHCP relay agents.  Furthermore,
   many access concentrators already glean location information from
   DHCP server responses, as part of the relay agent function.

   The gleaning mechanism as a technique to determine the IP addresses
   valid for a particular downstream link is preferred over other
   mechanisms (ARP, SNMP, LDAP) because of the lack of additional
   network traffic, but sometimes gleaning information can be
   incomplete.  The access concentrator usually cannot glean information
   from any DHCP unicast (i.e., non-relayed) messages due to performance
   reasons.  Furthermore, the DHCP-gleaned location information often

   does not persist across access concentrator reboots (due to lack of
   stable storage), and almost never persists across concentrator
   replacements.

4.4.  DHCP Servers Are a Reliable Source of Location Information

   DHCP servers are the most reliable source of location information for
   access concentrators, particularly when the location information is
   dynamic and not reproducible by algorithmic means (e.g., when a
   single IP subnet extends behind many broadband modems).  DHCP servers
   participate in all IP lease transactions (and therefore in all
   location information updates) with DHCP clients, whereas access
   concentrators sometimes miss some important lease transactions.

   An access concentrator can be configured with the IP addresses of
   multiple different DHCP servers, so that no one DHCP server is a
   single point of failure.

4.5.  Minimal Additional Configuration Is Required

   Access concentrators can usually query the same set of DHCP servers
   used for forwarding by the relay agent, thus minimizing configuration
   requirements.

5.  Protocol Overview

   In the following discussion of the DHCPLEASEQUERY message, the client
   of the message is assumed to be an access concentrator.  Note that
   access concentrators are not the only allowed (or required) consumers
   of the information provided by the DHCPLEASEQUERY message, but they
   do give readers a concrete feel for how the message might be used.

   The access concentrator initiates all DHCPLEASEQUERY message
   conversations.  This document assumes that the access concentrator
   gleans location information in its DHCP relay agent function.
   However, the location information is usually unavailable after the
   reboot or replacement of the access concentrator.

   Suppose the access concentrator is a router, and further suppose that
   the router receives an IP datagram to forward downstream to the
   public broadband access network.  If the location information for the
   downstream next hop is missing, the access concentrator sends one or
   more DHCPLEASEQUERY message(s), each containing the IP address of the
   downstream next hop in the "ciaddr" field.

   This query will then be answered by returning the information current
   when this client's lease was last granted or renewed, allowing the
   access concentrator to forward the IP datagram.

   An alternative approach is to send in a DHCPLEASEQUERY message with
   the "ciaddr" field empty and the MAC address (i.e., "htype", "hlen",
   and "chaddr" fields) with a valid MAC address or a Client-identifier
   option (option 61) appearing in the options area.  In this case, the
   DHCP server must return an IP address in the ciaddr if it has any
   record of the client described by the Client-identifier or MAC
   address.  In the absence of specific configuration information to the
   contrary (see Section 6.4), it SHOULD be the IP address with the
   latest client-last-transaction-time associated with the client
   described by the MAC address or Client-identifier option.

   The DHCP servers that implement this protocol always send a response
   to the DHCPLEASEQUERY message: either a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED,
   DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN.  The reasons why a
   DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message
   might be generated are explained in the specific query regimes,
   below.

   Servers that do not implement the DHCPLEASEQUERY message SHOULD
   simply not respond.

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message can support three query regimes:  A server
   that implements the DHCPLEASEQUERY message must implement all three
   query regimes.

      o Query by IP address:

        For this query, the requester supplies only an IP address in the
        DHCPLEASEQUERY message.  The DHCP server will return any
        information that it has on the most recent client to have been
        assigned that IP address.

        The DHCP server replies with a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED or
        DHCPLEASEACTIVE message if the IP address in the DHCPLEASEQUERY
        message corresponds to an IP address about which the server has
        definitive information (i.e., it is authorized to lease this IP
        address).  The server replies with a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message if
        the server does not have definitive information concerning the
        address in the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

      o Query by MAC address:

        For this query, the requester supplies only a MAC address in the
        DHCPLEASEQUERY message.  The DHCP server will return any
        information that it has on the IP address most recently accessed
        by a client with that MAC address.  In addition, it may supply
        additional IP addresses that have been associated with that MAC
        address in different subnets.  Information about these bindings

        can then be found using the Query by IP Address, described
        above.

        The DHCP server replies with a DHCPLEASEACTIVE message if the
        MAC address in the DHCPLEASEQUERY message corresponds to a MAC
        address with an active lease on an IP address in this server.
        The server replies with a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message if the server
        does not presently have an active lease by a client with this
        MAC address in this DHCP server.

      o Query by Client-identifier option:

        For this query, the requester supplies only a Client-identifier
        option in the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.  The DHCP server will
        return any information that it has on the IP address most
        recently accessed by a client with that Client-identifier.  In
        addition, it may supply additional IP addresses that have been
        associated with Client-identifier in different subnets.
        Information about these bindings can then be found using the
        Query by IP Address, described above.

        The DHCP server replies with a DHCPLEASEACTIVE message if the
        Client-identifier in the DHCPLEASEQUERY message currently has an
        active lease on an IP address in this DHCP server.  The server
        replies with a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message if the server does not
        have an active lease by a client with this Client-identifier.

   For many DHCP servers, the query by IP address is likely to be the
   most efficient form of leasequery.  This is the form of
   DHCPLEASEQUERY that SHOULD be used if possible.

   The DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED or DHCPLEASEACTIVE message reply must always
   contain the IP address in the "ciaddr" field.  The DHCPLEASEACTIVE
   message SHOULD contain the physical address of the IP address lease
   owner in the "htype", "hlen", and "chaddr" fields.  The Parameter
   Request List (option 55) can be used to request specific options to
   be returned about the IP address in the ciaddr.  The reply often
   contains the time until expiration of the lease, and the original
   contents of the Relay Agent Information option [RFC3046].  The access
   concentrator uses the "chaddr" field and Relay Agent Information
   option to construct location information, which can be cached on the
   access concentrator until lease expiration.

   Any DHCP server that supports the DHCPLEASEQUERY message SHOULD save
   the information from the most recent Relay Agent Information option
   (option 82) [RFC3046] associated with every IP address that it
   serves.  It is assumed that most clients that generate the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message will ask for the Relay Agent Information

   option (option 82) in the Parameter Request List (option 55), and so
   supporting the DHCPLEASEQUERY message without having the Relay Agent
   Information option around to return to the client is likely to be
   less than helpful.

   A server that implements DHCPLEASEQUERY SHOULD also save the
   information on the most recent Vendor class identifier, option 60,
   associated with each IP address, since this option is also likely to
   be requested by clients sending the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

6.  Protocol Details

6.1.  Definitions Required for DHCPLEASEQUERY Processing

   The operation of the DHCPLEASEQUERY message requires the definition
   of the following new and extended values for the DHCP packet beyond
   those defined by [RFC2131] and [RFC2132].  See also Section 8, IANA
   Considerations.

      1.  The message type option (option 53) from [RFC2132] requires
          four new values: one for the DHCPLEASEQUERY message itself and
          one for each of its three possible responses
          DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN.  The
          values of these message types are shown below in an extension
          of the table from section 9.6 of [RFC2132]:

                         Value   Message Type
                         -----   ------------
                           10    DHCPLEASEQUERY
                           11    DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED
                           12    DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN
                           13    DHCPLEASEACTIVE

      2.  There is a new option, the client-last-transaction-time:

          client-last-transaction-time

          This option allows the receiver to determine the time of the
          most recent access of the client.  It is particularly useful
          when DHCPLEASEACTIVE messages from two different DHCP servers
          need to be compared, although it can be useful in other
          situations.  The value is a duration in seconds from the
          current time into the past when this IP address was most
          recently the subject of communication between the client and
          the DHCP server.

          This MUST NOT be an absolute time.  This MUST NOT be an
          absolute number of seconds since Jan. 1, 1970.  Instead, this
          MUST be an integer number of seconds in the past from the time
          the DHCPLEASEACTIVE message is sent that the client last dealt
          with this server about this IP address.  In the same way that
          the IP Address Lease Time option (option 51) encodes a lease
          time that is a number of seconds into the future from the time
          the message was sent, this option encodes a value that is a
          number of seconds into the past from when the message was
          sent.

          The code for the this option is 91.  The length of the this
          option is 4 octets.

              Code   Len      Seconds in the past
             +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
             |  91 |  4  |  t1 |  t2 |  t3 |  t4 |
             +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+

      3.  There in a second new option, the associated-ip option:

          associated-ip

          This option is used to return all of the IP addresses
          associated with the DHCP client specified in a particular
          DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

          The code for this option is 92.  The minimum length for this
          option is 4 octets, and the length MUST always be a multiple
          of 4.

              Code   Len         Address 1               Address 2
             +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+--
             |  92 |  n  |  a1 |  a2 |  a3 |  a4 |  a1 |  a2 |  ...
             +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+--

6.2.  Sending the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message is typically sent by an access
   concentrator.  The DHCPLEASEQUERY message uses the DHCP message
   format as described in [RFC2131], and uses message number 10 in the
   DHCP Message Type option (option 53).  The DHCPLEASEQUERY message has
   the following pertinent message contents:

     o The giaddr MUST be set to the IP address of the requester (i.e.,
       the access concentrator).  The giaddr is independent of the
       "ciaddr" field to be searched -- it is simply the return address
       of the DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN
       message from the DHCP server.

       Note that this use of the giaddr is consistent with the
       definition of giaddr in [RFC2131], where the giaddr is always
       used as the return address of the DHCP response message.  In some
       (but not all) contexts in RFC 2131, the giaddr is used as the
       "key" to access the appropriate address pool.  The DHCPLEASEQUERY
       message is one of those cases where the giaddr MUST NOT be used
       as such a "key".

     o The Parameter Request List option (option 55) SHOULD be set to
       the options of interest to the requester.  The interesting
       options are likely to include the IP Address Lease Time option
       (option 51), the Relay Agent Information option (option 82), and
       possibly the Vendor class identifier option (option 60).  In the
       absence of a Parameter Request List option, the server SHOULD
       return the same options it would return for a DHCPREQUEST message
       that didn't contain a DHCPLEASEQUERY message, which includes
       those mandated by Section 4.3.1 of [RFC2131] as well as any
       options that the server was configured to always return to a
       client.

   Additional details concerning different query types are:

      o Query by IP address:

        The values of htype, hlen, and chaddr MUST be set to zero.

        The "ciaddr" field MUST be set to the IP address of the lease to
        be queried.

        The Client-identifier option (option 61) MUST NOT appear in the
        packet.

      o Query by MAC address:

        The values of htype, hlen, and chaddr MUST be set to the value
        of the MAC address to search for.

        The "ciaddr" field MUST be set to zero.

        The Client-identifier option (option 61) MUST NOT appear in the
        packet.

      o Query by Client-identifier option:

        There MUST be a Client-identifier option (option 61) in the
        DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

        The "ciaddr" field MUST be set to zero.

        The values of htype, hlen, and chaddr MUST be set to zero.

   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message SHOULD be sent to a DHCP server which is
   known to possess authoritative information concerning the IP address.
   The DHCPLEASEQUERY message MAY be sent to more than one DHCP server,
   and in the absence of information concerning which DHCP server might
   possess authoritative information concerning the IP address, it
   SHOULD be sent to all DHCP servers configured for the associated
   relay agent (if any are known).

   Any device expecting to use a DHCPLEASEQUERY message SHOULD ensure
   that the Relay Agent Info option that it uses contains information
   that unambiguously identifies the device.

6.3.  Receiving the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message

   A server that implements the DHCPLEASEQUERY message MUST implement
   all three query regimes: query by IP address, query by MAC address,
   and query by Client-identifier.

   A DHCPLEASEQUERY message MUST have a non-zero giaddr.  The
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message MUST have exactly one of the following: a
   non-zero ciaddr, a non-zero htype/hlen/chaddr, or a Client-identifier
   option.

   The DHCP server that receives a DHCPLEASEQUERY message MUST base its
   response on the particular data item used in the query.

   The giaddr is used only for the destination address of any generated
   response and, while required, is not otherwise used in generating the
   response to the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.  It MUST NOT be used to
   restrict the processing of the query in any way, and MUST NOT be used
   locate a subnet to which the ciaddr (if any) must belong.

   Note that this use of the giaddr is consistent with the definition of
   giaddr in [RFC2131], where the giaddr is always used as the return
   address of the DHCP response message.  In some (but not all) contexts
   in RFC 2131, the giaddr is used as the "key" to access the
   appropriate address pool.  The DHCPLEASEQUERY message is one of those
   cases where the giaddr MUST NOT be used as such a "key".

6.4.  Responding to the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message

   There are three possible responses to a DHCPLEASEQUERY message:

      o DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED

        The server MUST respond with a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED message if
        this server has information about the IP address, but there is
        no active lease for the IP address.  The DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED
        message is only returned for a query by IP address, and
        indicates that the server manages this IP address, but there is
        no currently active lease on this IP address.

      o DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN

        The DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message indicates that the server does not
        manage the IP address or the client specified in the
        DHCPLEASEQUERY message does not currently have a lease on an IP
        address.

        When responding with a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN, the DHCP server MUST
        NOT include other DHCP options in the response.

      o DHCPLEASEACTIVE

        The DHCPLEASEACTIVE message indicates that the server not only
        knows about the IP address and client specified in the
        DHCPLEASEACTIVE message, but also knows that there is an active
        lease by that client for that IP address.

        The server MUST respond with a DHCPLEASEACTIVE message when the
        IP address returned in the "ciaddr" field is currently leased.

6.4.1.  Determining the IP address about Which to Respond

   Since the response to a DHCPLEASEQUERY request can only contain full
   information about one IP address -- the one that appears in the
   "ciaddr" field -- determination of which IP address about which to
   respond is a key issue.  Of course, the values of additional IP
   addresses for which a client has a lease must also be returned in the
   associated-ip option (Section 6.1, #3).  This is the only information
   returned not directly associated with the IP address in the "ciaddr"
   field.

   In the event that an IP address appears in the "ciaddr" field of a
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message, if that IP address is one managed by the DHCP
   server, then that IP address MUST be set in the "ciaddr" field of a
   DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED message.

   If the IP address is not managed by the DHCP server, then a
   DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message must be returned.

   If the "ciaddr" field of the DHCPLEASEQUERY is zero, then the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message is a query by Client-identifier or MAC
   address.  In this case, the client's identity is any client that has
   proffered an identical Client-identifier option (if the Client-
   identifier option appears in the DHCPLEASEQUERY message), or an
   identical MAC address (if the MAC address fields in the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message are non-zero).  This client matching approach
   will, for the purposes of this section, be described as "Client-
   identifier or MAC address".

   If the "ciaddr" field is zero in a DHCPLEASEQUERY message, then the
   IP address placed in the "ciaddr" field of a DHCPLEASEACTIVE message
   MUST be that of an IP address for which the client that most recently
   used the IP address matches the Client-identifier or MAC address
   specified in the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

   If there is only a single IP address that fulfills this criteria,
   then it MUST be placed in the "ciaddr" field of the DHCPLEASEACTIVE
   message.

   In the case where more than one IP address has been accessed by the
   client specified by the MAC address or Client-identifier option, then
   the DHCP server MUST return the IP address returned to the client in
   the most recent transaction with the client unless the DHCP server
   has been configured by the server administrator to use some other
   preference mechanism.

   If, after all of the above processing, no value is set in the
   "ciaddr" field of the DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED or DHCPLEASEACTIVE message,
   then a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message MUST be returned instead.

6.4.2.  Building a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED or DHCPLEASEACTIVE Message Once
        the "ciaddr" Field Is Set

   Once the "ciaddr" field of the DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED is set, the
   processing for a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED message is complete.  No other
   options are returned for the DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED message.

   For the DHCPLEASEACTIVE message, the rest of the processing largely
   involves returning information about the IP address specified in the
   "ciaddr" field.

   The IP address in the "ciaddr" field of the DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED or
   DHCPLEASEACTIVE message MUST be one for which this server is
   responsible (or a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message would be have already been
   returned early in the processing described in the previous section).

   The MAC address of the DHCPLEASEACTIVE message MUST be set to the
   values that identify the client associated with the IP address in the
   "ciaddr" field of the DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED message.

   If the Client-identifier option (option 61) is specified in the
   Parameter Request List option (option 55), then the Client-identifier
   (if any) of the client associated with the IP address in the "ciaddr"
   field SHOULD be returned in the DHCPLEASEACTIVE message.

   In the case where more than one IP address has been involved in a
   DHCP message exchange with the client specified by the MAC address
   and/or Client-identifier option, then the list of all of the IP
   addresses MUST be returned in the associated-ip option, whether or
   not that option was requested as part of the Parameter Request List
   option.

   If the IP Address Lease Time option (option 51) is specified in the
   Parameter Request List and if there is a currently valid lease for
   the IP address specified in the ciaddr, then the DHCP server MUST
   return this option in the DHCPLEASEACTIVE message with its value
   equal to the time remaining until lease expiration.  If there is no
   valid lease for the IP address, then the server MUST NOT return the
   IP Address Lease Time option (option 51).

   A request for the Renewal (T1) Time Value option or the Rebinding
   (T2) Time Value option in the Parameter Request List of the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message MUST be handled like the IP Address Lease Time
   option is handled.  If there is a valid lease and these times are not

   yet in the past, then the DHCP server SHOULD return these options
   (when requested) with the remaining time until renewal or rebinding,
   respectively.  If these times are already in the past, or if there is
   not currently a valid lease for this IP address, the DHCP server MUST
   NOT return these options.

   If the Relay Agent Information (option 82) is specified in the
   Parameter Request List, then the information contained in the most
   recent Relay Agent Information option received from the relay agent
   associated with this IP address MUST be included in the
   DHCPLEASEACTIVE message.

   The DHCPLEASEACTIVE message SHOULD include the values of all other
   options not specifically discussed above that were requested in the
   Parameter Request List of the DHCPLEASEQUERY message and that are
   acceptable to return based on the list of "non-sensitive options",
   discussed below.

   DHCP servers SHOULD be configurable with a list of "non-sensitive
   options" that can be returned to the client when specified in the
   Parameter Request List of the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.  Any option not
   on this list SHOULD NOT be returned to a client, even if requested by
   that client.

   The DHCP server uses information from its lease binding database to
   supply the DHCPLEASEACTIVE option values.  The values of the options
   that were returned to the DHCP client would generally be preferred,
   but in the absence of those, options that were sent in DHCP client
   requests would be acceptable.

   In some cases, the Relay Agent Information option in an incoming
   DHCPREQUEST packet is used to help determine the options returned to
   the DHCP client that sent the DHCPREQUEST.  When responding to a
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message, the DHCP server MUST use the saved Relay
   Agent Information option just like it did when responding to the DHCP
   client in order to determine the values of any options requested by
   the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.  The goal is to return the same option
   values to the DHCPLEASEQUERY as those that were returned to the
   DHCPDISCOVER or DHCPREQUEST from the DHCP client (unless otherwise
   specified, above).

   In the event that two servers are cooperating to provide a high-
   availability DHCP server, as supported by [RFC2131], they would have
   to communicate some information about IP address bindings to each
   other.  In order to properly support the DHCPLEASEQUERY message,
   these servers MUST ensure that they communicate the Relay Agent
   Information option information to each other in addition to any other
   IP address binding information.

6.4.3.  Sending a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or
        DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN Message

   The server expects a giaddr in the DHCPLEASEQUERY message, and
   unicasts the DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or
   DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message to the giaddr.  If the "giaddr" field is
   zero, then the DHCP server MUST NOT reply to the DHCPLEASEQUERY
   message.

6.5.  Receiving a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED, DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or
      DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN Message

   When a DHCPLEASEACTIVE message is received in response to the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message, it means that there is a currently active
   lease for this IP address in this DHCP server.  The access
   concentrator SHOULD use the information in the "htype", "hlen", and
   "chaddr" fields of the DHCPLEASEACTIVE as well as any Relay Agent
   Information option information included in the packet to refresh its
   location information for this IP address.

   When a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED message is received in response to the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message, that means that there is no currently active
   lease for the IP address present in the DHCP server, but that this
   server does in fact manage that IP address.  In this case, the access
   concentrator SHOULD cache this information in order to prevent
   unacceptable loads on the access concentrator and the DHCP server in
   the face of a malicious or seriously compromised device downstream of
   the access concentrator.  This caching could be as simple as simply
   setting a bit saying that a response was received from a server that
   knew about this IP address but that there was no current lease.  This
   would, of course, need to be cleared when the access concentrator
   next "gleaned" that a lease for this IP address came into existence.

   In either case, when a DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED or DHCPLEASEACTIVE message
   is received in response to a DHCPLEASEQUERY message, it means that
   the DHCP server that responded is a DHCP server that manages the IP
   address present in the ciaddr, and the Relay Agent SHOULD cache this
   information for later use.

   When a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message is received by an access concentrator
   that has sent out a DHCPLEASEQUERY message, it means that the DHCP
   server contacted supports the DHCPLEASEQUERY message but that the
   DHCP server does not have definitive information concerning the IP
   address contained in the "ciaddr" field of the DHCPLEASEQUERY
   message.  If there is no IP address in the "ciaddr" field of the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message, then a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN message means that

   the DHCP server does not have definitive information concerning the
   DHCP client specified in the "hlen", "htype", and "chaddr" fields or
   the Client-identifier option of the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

   The access concentrator SHOULD cache this information, but only for a
   relatively short lifetime, approximately 5 minutes.

   Having cached this information, the access concentrator SHOULD only
   infrequently direct a DHCPLEASEQUERY message to a DHCP server that
   responded to a DHCPLEASEQUERY message for a particular "ciaddr" field
   with a DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN.

6.6.  Receiving No Response to the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message

   When an access concentrator receives no response to a DHCPLEASEQUERY
   message, there are several possible reasons:

     o The DHCPLEASEQUERY or a corresponding DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED,
       DHCPLEASEACTIVE, or DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN was lost during transmission
       or the DHCPLEASEQUERY arrived at the DHCP server but it was
       dropped because the server was too busy.

     o The DHCP server doesn't support DHCPLEASEQUERY.

   In the first of the cases above, a retransmission of the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY would be appropriate, but in the second of the two
   cases, a retransmission would not be appropriate.  There is no way to
   tell these two cases apart (other than, perhaps, because of a DHCP
   server's response to other DHCPLEASEQUERY messages indicating that it
   does or does not support the DHCPLEASEQUERY message).

   An access concentrator that utilizes the DHCPLEASEQUERY message
   SHOULD attempt to resend DHCPLEASEQUERY messages to servers that do
   not respond to them using a backoff algorithm for the retry time that
   approximates an exponential backoff.  The access concentrator SHOULD
   adjust the backoff approach such that DHCPLEASEQUERY messages do not
   arrive at a server that is not otherwise known to support the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message at a rate of more than approximately one
   packet every 10 seconds, and yet (if the access concentrator needs to
   send DHCPLEASEQUERY messages) not less than one DHCPLEASEQUERY per 70
   seconds.

   In practice, this approach would probably best be handled by a per-
   server timer that is restarted whenever a response to a
   DHCPLEASEQUERY message is received, and expires after one minute.
   The per-server timer would start off expired, and in the expired
   state only one DHCPLEASEQUERY message would be queued for the
   associated server.

   All DHCPLEASEQUERY messages SHOULD use the exponential backoff
   algorithm specified in Section 4.1 of [RFC2131].

   Thus, in the initial state, the per-server timer is expired, and a
   single DHCPLEASEQUERY message is queued for each server.  After the
   first response to a DHCPLEASEQUERY message, the per-server timer is
   started.  At that time, multiple DHCPLEASEQUERY messages can be sent
   in parallel to the DHCP server, though the total number SHOULD be
   limited to 100 or 200, to avoid swamping the DHCP server.  Each of
   these messages uses the [RFC2131] exponential backoff algorithm.
   Every time a response to any of these messages is received, the per-
   server timer is reset and starts counting again up to one minute.  In
   the event the per-server timer goes off, then all outstanding
   messages SHOULD be dropped except for a single DHCPLEASEQUERY message
   that is used to poll the server at approximately 64-second intervals
   until such time as another (or the first) response to the
   DHCPLEASEQUERY is received.

   In the event that there is no DHCPLEASEQUERY traffic for one minute,
   then the per-server timer will expire.  After that time, there will
   only be one DHCPLEASEQUERY message allowed to be outstanding to that
   server until a response to that message is received.

6.7.  Lease Binding Data Storage Requirements

   DHCP server implementations that implement the DHCPLEASEQUERY
   capability MUST save the most recent Relay Agent Information option
   from the most recent DHCPREQUEST packet for two reasons.  First, it
   is almost certain to be requested by in the dhcp-parameter-request-
   list option in any DHCPLEASEQUERY request.  Second, the saved Relay
   Agent Information option may be necessary to determine the value of
   other options given to the DHCP client, if these are requested by the
   dhcp-parameter-request list in the DHCPLEASEQUERY request.

   This is a list of the information that is required to successfully
   implement

      o relay-agent-info option from client packet: MUST store with
        binding.

      o client-last-transaction-time of last client interaction: MUST
        store with binding.

      o vendor-class-id: SHOULD store with binding.

   These data storage requirements are minimally larger than those
   required for normal operation of the DHCP protocol, as required to
   properly implement [RFC2131].

6.8.  Using the DHCPLEASEQUERY Message with Multiple DHCP Servers

   When using the DHCPLEASEQUERY message in an environment where
   multiple DHCP servers may contain authoritative information about the
   same IP address (such as when two DHCP servers are cooperating to
   provide a high-availability DHCP service), multiple, possibly
   conflicting, responses might be received.

   In this case, some information in the response packet SHOULD be used
   to decide among the various responses.  The client-last-transaction-
   time (if it is available) can be used to decide which server has more
   recent information concerning the IP address returned in the "ciaddr"
   field.

7.  Security Considerations

   Access concentrators that use DHCP gleaning, refreshed with
   DHCPLEASEQUERY messages, will maintain accurate location information.
   Location information accuracy ensures that the access concentrator
   can forward data traffic to the intended location in the broadband
   access network, can perform IP source address verification of
   datagrams from the access network, and can encrypt traffic that can
   only be decrypted by the intended access modem (e.g., [BPI] and
   [BPI+]).  As a result, the access concentrator does not need to
   depend on ARP broadcasts across the access network, which is
   susceptible to malicious hosts that masquerade as the intended IP
   endpoints.  Thus, the DHCPLEASEQUERY message allows an access
   concentrator to provide considerably enhanced security.

   DHCP servers SHOULD prevent exposure of location information
   (particularly the mapping of hardware address to IP address lease,
   which can be an invasion of broadband subscriber privacy) by
   employing the techniques detailed in [RFC3118], "Authentication for
   DHCP Messages".

   This RFC describes how a DHCP client interacts with a DHCP server.
   Access concentrators that send the DHCPLEASEQUERY message are
   essentially DHCP clients for the purposes of the DHCPLEASEQUERY
   message, even though they perform the functions of a DHCP relay agent
   as well.  Thus, [RFC3118] is an appropriate mechanism for
   DHCPLEASEQUERY messages.

   Since [RFC3118] discusses the normal DHCP client interaction,
   consisting of a DHCPDISCOVER, DHCPOFFER, DHCPREQUEST, and DHCPACK, it
   is necessary to transpose the operations described in [RFC3118] to
   the DHCPLEASEQUERY domain.  The operations described in [RFC3118] for

   DHCPDISCOVER are performed for DHCPLEASEQUERY, and the operations
   described for DHCPOFFER are performed for DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED,
   DHCPLEASEACTIVE, and DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN messages.

   Access concentrators SHOULD minimize potential denial of service
   attacks on the DHCP servers by minimizing the generation of
   DHCPLEASEQUERY messages.  In particular, the access concentrator
   SHOULD employ negative caching (i.e., cache DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED,
   DHCPLEASEACTIVE, and DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN responses to DHCPLEASEQUERY
   messages) and ciaddr restriction (i.e., don't send a DHCPLEASEQUERY
   message with a ciaddr outside of the range of the attached broadband
   access networks).  Together, these mechanisms limit the access
   concentrator to transmitting one DHCPLEASEQUERY message (excluding
   message retries) per legitimate broadband access network IP address
   after a reboot event.

   DHCP servers supporting the DHCPLEASEQUERY message SHOULD ensure that
   they cannot be successfully attacked by being flooded with large
   quantities of DHCPLEASEQUERY messages in a short time.

   In some environments, it may be appropriate to configure a DHCP
   server with the IP addresses of the relay agents for which it may
   respond to DHCPLEASEQUERY messages, thereby allowing it to respond
   only to requests from only a handful of relay agents.  This does not
   provide any true security, but may be useful to thwart
   unsophisticated attacks of various sorts.

8.  IANA Considerations

   IANA has assigned six values for this document.  See Section 6.1 for
   details.  There are four new messages types, which are the value of
   the message type option (option 53) from [RFC2132].  The value for
   DHCPLEASEQUERY is 10, the value for DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED is 11, the
   value for DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN is 12, and the value for DHCPLEASEACTIVE
   is 13.  Finally, there are two new DHCP option defined; the client-
   last-transaction-time option -- option code 91, and the associated-ip
   option -- option code 92.

9.  Acknowledgements

   Jim Forster, Joe Ng, Guenter Roeck, and Mark Stapp contributed
   greatly to the initial creation of the DHCPLEASEQUERY message.

   Patrick Guelat suggested several improvements to support static IP
   addressing.  Thomas Narten made many suggestions for improvements.
   Russ Housley pressed effectively for increased security capabilities,
   and Ted Hardie suggested ways to minimize undesired information
   leakage.  Bert Wijnen suggested we clarify our focus to DHCPv4 and

   distinguish our approach from that of the DHCP MIB.  R. Barr Hibbs,
   one of the authors of the DHCP MIB, supplied information to
   effectively distinguish that effort from DHCPLEASEQUERY.

10.  References

10.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]   Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
               Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC2131]   Droms, R., "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol", RFC
               2131, March 1997.

   [RFC3046]   Patrick, M., "DHCP Relay Agent Information Option", RFC
               3046, January 2001.

   [RFC3118]   Droms, R. and W. Arbaugh, "Authentication for DHCP
               Messages", RFC 3118, June 2001.

10.2.  Informative References

   [RFC826]    Plummer, D., "Ethernet Address Resolution Protocol: Or
               converting network protocol addresses to 48.bit Ethernet
               address for transmission on Ethernet hardware", STD 37,
               RFC 826, November 1982.

   [RFC951]    Croft, W. and J. Gilmore, "Bootstrap Protocol", RFC 951,
               September 1985.

   [RFC1542]   Wimer, W., "Clarifications and Extensions for the
               Bootstrap Protocol", RFC 1542, October 1993.

   [RFC2132]   Alexander, S. and R. Droms, "DHCP Options and BOOTP
               Vendor Extensions", RFC 2132, March 1997.

   [RFC3315]   Droms, R., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins, C.,
               and M. Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for
               IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, July 2003.

   [BPI]       SCTE Data Standards Subcommittee, "Data-Over-Cable
               Service Interface Specifications: DOCSIS 1.0 Baseline
               Privacy Interface Specification SCTE 22-2 2002", 2002,
               available at http://www.scte.org/standards/.

   [BPI+]      CableLabs, "Data-Over-Cable Service Interface
               Specifications: Baseline Privacy Plus Interface
               Specification CM-SP-BPI+_I12-050812", August 2005,
               available at http://www.cablemodem.com/.

   [DHCPMIB]   Hibbs, R., Waters, G., "Dynamic Host Configuration
               Protocol (DHCP) Server MIB", Work in Progress, February
               2004.

   [DOCSIS]    SCTE Data Standards Subcommittee, "Data-Over-Cable
               Service Interface Specifications: DOCSIS 1.0 Radio
               Frequency Interface Specification SCTE 22-1 2002", 2002,
               available at http://www.scte.org/standards/.

   [EUROMODEM] ECCA, "Technical Specification of a European Cable Modem
               for digital bi-directional communications via cable
               networks", Version 1.0, May 1999.

Authors' Addresses

   Rich Woundy
   Comcast Cable
   27 Industrial Ave.
   Chelmsford, MA  01824

   Phone: (978) 244-4010
   EMail: richard_woundy@cable.comcast.com

   Kim Kinnear
   Cisco Systems
   1414 Massachusetts Ave
   Boxborough, MA 01719

   Phone: (978) 936-0000
   EMail: kkinnear@cisco.com

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