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In-line Skating FAQ: Figure Skating (2.5)

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Posted-By: auto-faq 3.1.1.2
Archive-name: sports/skating/inline-faq/part6

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
   _r.s.s.inline FAQ: Techniques - Figure Skating_
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                             INLINE FIGURE SKATING
                                       
   (Last changed May 31, 1995) by Jennifer Kretschmer (jen@rahul.net)
   
   Here's the first group of "tricks" that I have been able to take from
   ice figure skating and translating it to in-lines. I'll do one of each
   rating. The ratings again are:
   

                  Beginner = *
              Intermediate = **
              Int/Advanced = ***
                  Advanced = ****

  Tricks
     * Swizzles *
     * Spiral **
     * 3 Turn ***
     * Two-Foot Spin ****
     * Waltz Jump ***
     * Axels ****+
     * Loop Jump ****
       
   _Swizzles *:_
          This is a move that can be used to skate forward or later to
          skate backwards. (backwards requires your weight to be towards
          the toe, and going forward requires weight toward the heels.)
          It is good for building up groin muscles, and the inside of
          your thighs. In swizzles, your feet do not leave the gound.
          Start by gliding on two feet about 7-8 inches apart. Then allow
          your feet to slide out while moving until they are about 24-28
          inches apart. Here comes the harder part where your groin
          muscles come in. Without lifting your feet off the ground,
          glide and pull your feet back in until they are again 7-8
          inches apart. Repeat the move over and over. You will soon gain
          momentum, and the move will become easier to do with speed.
          
   _Spiral **:_
          This is a graceful move that you see figure skaters doing
          often. This will be easier for more flexible people to do. It
          requires good balance, so you should be able to skate on one
          foot with ease before you try this. Gliding on one foot, point
          your toe of your free skate and slowly lift your leg behind
          you. Arch your back, and bend at the waist only. Don't throw
          your body weight forward or you will loose your balance. You
          shoud try to balance all of your weight on your skating leg. A
          good spiral form is when you can get your free leg up higher
          than your head.
          
   _3 Turn ***:_
          This is a move that allows you to turn backwards by skating on
          one foot. This will require you to go almost onto one wheel
          only for a split second. You will fall trying to learn this, so
          be prepared. Once you get it, your friends will be impressed.
          Use whatever foot you feel most comfortable skating on one
          foot. Most people feel that this move is easiest if your
          skating leg is your left one.
          
          There are many types of 3 turns that deal with the "edge"
          (direction), but right now I will just describe it generically.
          Try holding onto something like a fence or bench when you first
          try this, and watch your chin if you fall. I had a friend who
          bumped her chin on a bench when she fell. Gliding on one foot,
          allow your free foot to hang behind you. Swing the free leg
          around slowly and shift your hips at the same time. Let your
          foot rock up towards your toe, and swing it backwards at the
          same time as your leg and hips go. You should now be skating
          backwards on one foot.
          
   _Two-foot Spin ****:_
          This is so fun to do, but be prepared to get dizzy. This
          requires you to be on only two wheels. You can do it on your
          heels, on your toes, or the easiest on one toe and one heel.
          Most people feel comfortable spinning counter-clockwise. This
          is the common direction to spin in figure skating unless you
          are left-handed and do everything in the opposite direction. I
          will explain a right handed, toe-heel two foot spin like would
          be done on ice.
          
          You will be on the toe of your left foot and the heel of your
          right and will spin counter-clockwise. Start with your arms out
          to your side and feet slightly apart. "Wind up" by swinging
          your arms 90degrees in the clockwise direction. This will turn
          your body a little but don't let your feet move. All at the
          same time, swing your arms back the other way and pop up onto
          your toe heel position. Pull your arms into your body like your
          are trying to hug yourself. This will make you spin faster. Let
          your arms out to slow down and drop back to all your wheels.
          
   _Waltz Jump ***:_
          You should be able to do 180s before you try this one. I will
          explain first how to do just the moves, with no grace attached.
          However, this is a very graceful jump, and when done properly
          almost gives the allusion of doing splits in the air. While
          skating forward, glide on your left foot (if you are
          left-handed or feel more comfortable skating on your right
          foot, do the exact opposite as I describe). Begin rotating your
          body counter clock-wise. Allow your free leg to come forward.
          When your body is 90 degress and your foot is still forward,
          jump off of your left skate. While in the air rotate you body
          the last 90 degrees, change feet in the air and land on your
          RIGHT skate backwards.
          
          To add some more grace, let your right leg swing forward to
          help you take off. Try this a few times holding onto a wall or
          bench or couch, with your skates on or off. Getting your body
          used to jumping off one leg and landing on the other is the
          hard part of this trick. Once you get this jump down, then more
          advanced figure skating jumps become easier to understand.
          
   _Axels_
          I've heard some poeple asking about axels on inline skates.
          Although I mentioned before that I will only discuss those
          figured skating moves that I can do on inlines properly, I will
          talk about axels anyway. My main problem is landing on one
          foot, so I two foot the landing. I tend to land with my weight
          a little forward (an old habit I also had on ice) so that on
          inlines, I roll up to my toe, and fall. I know that I can
          correct if only I would keep my body straight, but old habits
          die hard.
          
          An AXEL is a ****+ maneuver on my scale. It requires excellent
          balance, and a lot of strength to pull off on inlines. This
          jump takes off forward off your left foot (outside edge),
          rotates one and a half times (540 degrees), and lands on your
          right foot (outside edge) going backwards. An important part of
          the take off is usuing your free right leg to "kick" forward
          helping you to take off. If you are new to trying this
          maneuver, try doing it on carpet or grass without your skates
          on. If you can't get the rotation without your skates on, you
          won't be able to do it with the extra weight of your skates.
          Another tip for the takeoff, is that most ice skaters like to
          skate into the jump going backward, and then stepping forward
          onto your left foot an immediately taking off. You can do it
          this way, or from skating forward depending on your comfort. I
          have noticed that most roller skaters do axels from a forward
          skating position. Try both, and use the one that allows you to
          get the most height and control.
          
   _Loop Jump_
          Here's a new figure skating maneuver it's called a loop jump. I
          would consider this and advance jump to try. you must already
          be able to do a 360 jump starting backwards and landing
          backwards.
          
          LOOP JUMP: is a jump where you take off backwards on two feet,
          but land backwards on one foot. Skating backwards, scissor your
          feet so that your left foot is slightly in front of your right.
          Bend your knees deeply and glide in a counter clock-wise
          circle. Take off on an outside edge on your right foot still
          with your left foot trailing in front, and use your knee bend
          to "pop" yourself into the air.
          
          Turn your body in the air in a counter clock-wise direction and
          pull your arms into your body (grabbing your left shoulder with
          your right hand sometimes helps in the rotation). Also, while
          taking off, lift your left leg up slightly higher than your
          right ankle.
          
          When you have completed the 360 rotation, land on your right
          leg skating backwards on an outside edge, and allow your free
          leg to extend behind you. (Like the way you see ice figure
          skaters land) Remember to try this only when you can do a 360
          in the counter clock-wise direction on two feet from backwards
          skating to a backwards landing.
          
          You will fall many times learning how to do this so please wear
          protective gear including a helmet. The most common fall for
          this jump is in the landing. If you lean forward, you will roll
          up on your toe and do a face plant. Make sure that you bend
          ONLY AT YOUR KNEES AND NOT AT YOUR WAIST! Keep your back
          straight.
          
   
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  Other stuff

From: mins@cnj.digex.net (timothy mizerak)
Newsgroups: rec.sport.skating.inline
Subject: Re: Figure Skating on InLines!
Date: 3 May 1995 22:21:45 -0400

>|>  *** 3 TURN:  This is a move that allows you to turn backwards by skating
>|> on one foot.  This will require you to go almost onto one wheel only for
>|> a split second.  You will fall trying to learn this, so be prepared.
>|> Once you get it, your friends will be impressed.  Use whatever foot you
>|> feel most comfortable skating on one foot.  Most people feel that this
>|> move is easiest if your skating leg is your left one.  There are many

Most people are right-handed and prefer to rotate counter-clockwise, so that
would make the left outside 3 turn the easiest.  The direction of turn is
very critical with 3 turns.  You'll want to find your strongest direction
and stick with it until you have that mastered, then start learning the other
way.

>|> types of 3 turns that deal with the "edge" (direction), but right now I wil
l
>|> just describe it generically.  Try holding onto something like a fence or

What really made the difference to my three turn was to *really* stress the
edge.  My first 3 turn was the right outside, and once I realized that was
what I was trying to do, it started to come much easier.  I had always been
holding a straight line and finding it so difficult.  So, think about drawing
that 3 when you do this move and it will help.

>|> friend who bumped her chin on a bench when she fell.  Gliding on one
>|> foot, allow your free foot to hang behind you.  Swing the free leg around
>|> slowly and shift your hips at the same time.  Let your foot rock up
>|> towards your toe, and swing it backwards at the same time as your leg and
>|> hips go.  You should now be skating backwards on one foot.

This is basically it, but I can picture a lot of over-rotated turns.  The
key is to set your arms and shoulders first, then to let the rest of your body
and foot complete the turn.  I wouldn't stress the swing on the free leg
either as it would also seem to over-rotate or pull the whole thing off
balance.  It's in the shoulders first, the hips second, then the foot.

Shooshie's advice to practice these with two feet at first is very good.
If you realize it or not, you have actually taught yourself two 3 turns that
way, one outside and one inside!


Timothy Mizerak, mins@cnj.digex.com


On Tue, 2 May 1995, Shooshie wrote:
> I'm still pretty lame on 3-turns, but I'm in no hurry, and I notice
> improvement all the time. I do have a question for you. Do you "snap" your
> body around, or just gracefully turn it and snap your foot at some point
> in the turn? Also, when doing it in reverse (from backward to forward), do
> you still do it on your toes, or do you use your heel? I have done both,
> but I suspect that the heel version probably goes by another name. I've
> been needing to ask someone this... maybe you would help.
>

Shooshie,
I tend to do the slow, "graceful" move with my body turning and at the
last second when my body is almost backwards I "snap" my foot.  I use my
arms too, but that's mostly from my figure skating traing when I had a
coach yell at me to keep my head up and my arms out to the side.  I even
position my hands the way she used to make me.
The backwards one, I always did with my weight towards the heel, even on
ice.  I'm not sure how you mean when you say you use your toes.  If you
can go from backwards to forwards going up on your toe, I believe that
you have invented a new turn.  I'll check my handbook to see if I can
find it.  If not then we should call it a "Shooshie Turn!"  I like the
sound of that.

   
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