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Comp.software-eng FAQ (Part 3): readings
Section - Textbooks

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Date:  6 Dec 1997
Originally collected by: hsrender@happy.colorado.edu (Hal Render)
The first 8 items are Hal Render's original list in his rough order of prefer­
ence.

1.  Software Engineering: The Production of Quality Software by Shari Pfleeger,
    2nd Edition, Macmillan, 1991, ISBN 0-02-395115-X.
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: Like #2&#3, had the best explanations of what
    I want to cover (different engineering lifecycles, methods, and tools).
2.  Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach by Roger Pressman, 4th
    Edition, McGraw-Hill, 1996, ISBN 0070521824
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: (on 2nd edition): Like #1&#3, had the best
      explanations of what I want to cover (different engineering lifecycles,
      methods, and tools).
    robb@iotek.uucp (Robb Swanson): The definitive book on the subject as far
      as I'm concerned.
    johnson@aplcen.apl.jhu.edu (Michelle Johnson): A good text book as well as
      reference.
3.  Software Systems Engineering by Andrew Sage and James D. Palmer.
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: Like #1&#2, had the best explanations of what
      I want to cover (different engineering lifecycles, methods, and tools).
4.  Fundamentals of Software Engineering by Ghezzi, Jayazeri and Mandrioli,
    Prentice-Hall, 1991
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: Like #5, good, and covered the issue of
      specifications and verification better, but at the expense of other
      aspects of the development process.  I may use one of them for a graduate
      course in software engineering.
    nancy@murphy.ICS.UCI.EDU (Nancy Leveson): Better than Sommerville, although
      I like much of Sommerville.
5.  Software Engineering with Abstractions by Valdis Berzins and Luqi, Addison
    Wesley, 1991, 624 pages.
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: Like #4, good, and covered the issue
      of specifications and verification better, but at the expense of other
      aspects of the development process.  I may use one of them for a graduate
      course in software engineering.
    straub@cs.UMD.EDU (Pablo A. Straub): Both this and #9 have a good emphasis
      on using formal techniques (i.e.,  doing engineering properly), but they
      do not disregard informal methods; chapters are roughly organized around
      the traditional lifecycle.  #5 is longer and can be used in a two-term
      sequence or for graduate students (it's  possible  to use  it in a one-
      term undergrad course by covering only part of the material). One thing I
      like is that management and validation is given in all chapters, so that
      these activities are integrated into the development process.  Emphasizes
      the use of formally specified abstractions.  Uses the authors'
      specification language (Spec) to develop a project in Ada.
6.  Software Engineering by Ian Sommerville, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-17568-1
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: Our current text, and my basic problem with it
      is the vague way it covers many of the topics.
7.  Software Engineering with Student Project Guidance by Barbara Mynatt
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: Like #8, not bad, but fairly low-level and
      doesn't cover many tools and techniques I consider valuable.
8.  Software Engineering by Roger Jones
    hsrender@happy.colorado.edu: Like #7, not bad, but fairly low-level and
      doesn't cover many tools and techniques I consider valuable.
9.  Software Engineering: Planning for Change by David Alex Lamb, Prentice-
    Hall, 1988, 298 pages.
    straub@cs.UMD.EDU (Pablo A. Straub): Both this and #5 have a good emphasis
      on using formal techniques (i.e.,  doing engineering properly), but they
      do not disregard informal methods; chapters are roughly organized around
      the traditional lifecycle. #9 has the advantage of being shorter, yet
      covering most relevant topics (lifecycle phases, formal specs, v&v,
      configurations, management, etc.).  It is very appropriate for an
      undergrad course.  It emphasizes that maintenance is a given and should
      be taken into account (hence the title).  Several specification
      techniques are covered and used to develop a project in Pascal.
10. A Practical Handbook for Software Development by N.D. Birrell and M.A.
    Ould, Cambridge University Press, 1985/88. ISBN 0-521-34792-0 (Paper
    cover); ISBN 0-521-25462-0 (Hard cover).
    ewoods@hemel.bull.co.uk (Eoin Woods):
11. Fundamentals of Computing for Software Engineers by Eric S. Chan & Murat M.
    Tanik, Van Nostrand Reinhold.
    kayaalp@csvax.seas.smu.edu (Mehmet M. Kayaalp MD):
12. Classic and Object-Oriented Software Engineering, 3rd Edition, by Stephen
    R. Schach, Richard D. Irwin, Inc. (ISBN 0-256-18298-1), 1996.  Advertised
    as senior/first year graduate level, emphasizing the object-oriented
    paradigm, metrics, CASE tools, testing, and maintenance.
13. Practical Software Engineering by Stephen R. Schach, Aksen Associates and
    Richard D. Irwin Inc. (ISBN 0-256-11455-2), 1992. Advertised as sophomore
    through senior level, emphasizing teams, maintenance, reuse, CASE tools.

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