Search the FAQ Archives

3 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M
N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z
faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives

Einstein (1905) Absurdities
Section - 13. The "strange effects of nothing" absurdities.

( Single Page )
[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index | Cities ]


Top Document: Einstein (1905) Absurdities
Previous Document: 12. The "how does an absurd SR work" non-absurdity.
Next Document: 14. The "lasting effects of no effect" absurdity.
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
According to Special Relativity, nothing can have
amazing effects.

There are no coordinate systems in nature; they're 'just'
imaginary. But in SR, they are supposed to have real effects.

One you see being talked about fairly frequently.

Let a charged particle move at velocity v through an
electromagnetic field.

Now, imagine a coordinate system moving at that same velocity.
The velocity of the charged particle is thus zero, they say,
and there is no effect of the electromagnetic field.

They really do say such stupid things, folks.

Einstein started his SR paper in somewhat that way.

Before Maxwell, there was an equation for the effect of
an electric field, and another equation for a magnetic
field. The magnetic one had a velocity term in it, the
electric one didn't.

So, they decided back then, the equations insisted that
if you moved the magnetic near conducting wires there
would be an induced electric current; after all, there
is a velocity term in the magnetic equation.

But, they said, the electric equation equation said there
was no effect if you waved the wires near a magnetic; after
all, there was no velocity term in the electric equation.

In other words, the v in the magnetic field was not a
velocity of a magnet and a wire wrt each other, but
with respect to something that doesn't exist in nature:
a coordinate system.

You will hear it said to this very day by trained SRians,
that Galilean physics says moving the wires will give
you no current.

And they will say that if you transform the Maxwell equations
- with the SR transforms - so that the imaginary coordinate
system is moving at the velocity of the magnet, there is no
induced current.

In other words - that they won't use - if you draw a
coordinate axes system on a piece of paper and put the
wires on it and move the magnet, you'll get a current,
but if you tape the coordinate system to the magnet
and move the magnet, you'll get no current.

That is what SR says.

But if you think about it deeply enough, in terms of the
ratio scale versus interval scale discussion, you'll see
why they have to say such idiotic things.

You see, when you take the generalized form, such as
(x-x0) and transform it, the velocity terms drop out,
or cancel each other arithmetically if you leave the
equation in primed form instead of simplifying it back
to the unprimed form.

But if you don't mind using the degraded interval data
and transform you have only one transform velocity term
in the bag, and so the transform velocity term doesn't
drop out.

And if you already had a velocity term in the equation,
at the same speed, it is true that the algebraic effect
is that there might now be a zero result.

Sure, subtract the velocity of an imaginary velocity
from a real one (perhaps the velocity of a charged
particle or a magnet) and you get a zero result if
the two are the same.

Try telling your mortgage company that you now owe
them nothing because you subtracted an imaginary
payment from the amount you owed them.  Hey. If it
works in physics - SCIENCE! - how can a mere finance
company or bank deny your logic?

User Contributions:

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA




Top Document: Einstein (1905) Absurdities
Previous Document: 12. The "how does an absurd SR work" non-absurdity.
Next Document: 14. The "lasting effects of no effect" absurdity.

Single Page

[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index ]

Send corrections/additions to the FAQ Maintainer:
Thnktank@concentric.net (Eleaticus)





Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM