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Hedgehog FAQ [7/7] - Wild Hedgehogs
Section - <11.1> Intro to wild hedgehogs

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Single Page )
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See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
This FAQ originally started out (and is still largely oriented at) pet
hedgehogs.  So why the emphasis on their wild cousins?  Hedgehogs enjoy a
very unique niche in that they seem to inspire people to like them (or in
many cases, fall head over heels in love with them) and want to help them
out, or at least want to enjoy the company of hedgehogs in and around them.

Our views of hedgehogs in the wild transcend what we normally feel for most
`wild' animals that we encounter.  How many animals do we go to such great
lengths to encourage to come into our gardens and backyards for a visit?  How
many wild animals get the same level of helping hand, with food being put out
specifically for them?  And how many animals have hospitals named just for
them?  (I realize these kind hospitals do not limit themselves to treating
just hedgehogs).  

How many of us can resist the cute little face of hedgehog -- something that
just reaches out to our hearts for help.  One only has to look at the number
and variety of organizations that are trying to help out hedgehogs in need to
see how great the interest is.  This makes it all the more amazing that
hedgehogs were hunted and persecuted only a few decades ago, as being pests.

Why hedgehogs inspire so much human compassion is often very hard to pin
down.  The fact that they do, and that this desire to help seems to be so
very widespread, is nothing short of impressive.  Even so, our prickly little
friends face what is still often a losing battle, in the face of human
encroachment, and the dangers it often brings with it.

Fortunately, everyone who lives where wild hedgehogs can be found, can take
part in helping out our little friends.  This can vary from simply making
some of the everyday throwaway items a bit safer before being tossed out, to
adapting a garden area to be attractive to hedgehogs, or even helping out
with one of the hedgehog help/rescue organizations.  No special skills are
needed to help out -- just a love of hedgehogs.

Of course, there are those who simply collect hedgehog memorabilia
(hedgehogabilia) as their way of showing their interest in hedgehogs.  This
is how I came by my love (well, addiction is probably more accurate) for
hedgehogs, and usually expands to well beyond the simple act of collecting.

This part of the FAQ is intended to cover as much as I can add on where to
get involved and how to help out with wild hedgehogs.  The number of people
I've heard from who are trying to help out these little friends in need is
truly amazing and encouraging.  I hope that the tips and suggestions here,
will help others who find themselves in the position of helping a hedgehog.
 

User Contributions:

Rio
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 26, 2012 @ 10:22 pm
Hi, my hedgehog started running around her cage squealing so I took her out to see what was wrong. Her genital area was inflamed and she had open sores all around that area. I gave her a bath, but I'm really worried about her. Do you have any idea what this could be?
Thank you!

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Top Document: Hedgehog FAQ [7/7] - Wild Hedgehogs
Previous Document: CONTENTS OF THIS FILE
Next Document: <11.2> What hedgehog books are there?

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM