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rec.arts.bodyart: Tattoo FAQ 8/9--Misc. info
Section - HOW DO I BECOME A TATTOO ARTIST?

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Part8 - Part9 - Single Page )
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See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
Depending on how it's asked, this question probably receives the most
amount of flames when posted to RAB. The general concensus is that there
is only "one way" to do it, and that is to apprentice, period. There is
far more to be learned about the art and business of tattooing than what
can be obtained simply from a book (e.g. customer service, etiquette,
running a business, dealing with emergencies).

Ever seen _Karate Kid_ where the boy learns his skills through mundane,
seemingly unrelated things like waxing a car? Spending eight months to a
year under a well-established artist's wings can help you to really
learn what's involved in being a professional tattooist, as well as in
how to run your own small business. Just as you would never consider
becoming a professional masseuse or an acupuncturist without proper
training, neither should you try to become a professional tattooist
without the proper training.

Unfortunately, many people consider "proper training" to mean "good at
drawing and used a tattoo machine." If you are a good illustrator, it
simply means you might have a better chance at finding an artist willing
to be your mentor.

As far as I know, there are no reputable schools that offer
instruction in tattooing. There have been a few shops that offered
programs, but they were generally scams of one sort or another. So
once again, you are back to having to serve as an apprentice if you
want to learn tattooing.

The hardest part of becoming an apprentice is in finding an artist who
will take you seriously and let you work in the shop. Having a portfolio
of illustrations will certainly help. You will also end up knocking on a
lot of doors. Not every artist will want to have an apprentice, since
that means extra work for them. To prove your commitment, you may be
asked to put time in without any monetary compensation at all for a
while. And for many months, all you will do might be answering the phone
and mopping the floor. But remember that that is all part of your
training! Wax in, wax out! Expect to devote at least two to three years
to this form of training.

Lastly, think very carefully about your consequences should you decide
not to go with the apprentice route:
o You may have difficulty becoming an established artist.
o You may have difficulty finding people you can work on.
o You may end up with a bad reputation for bad work.
o You may not learn how to run a business, and end up having to
  declare bankruptcy.

...be happy you're not trying to become a master sushi chef: They take
*12 YEARS* to attain (and it takes five years just to get the privilege
of cooking the rice).


User Contributions:

Yusuph
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 16, 2012 @ 12:00 am
I real to know much the history of tattoo, from the begin. Please send for me the all details/summary or imformation of tattoo. You can find me also on facebook as Toto mbata chico. Thank u

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Top Document: rec.arts.bodyart: Tattoo FAQ 8/9--Misc. info
Previous Document: HOW DO I TEMPORARILY COVER UP A TATTOO?
Next Document: THE DARK SIDE OF TATTOOING

Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Part8 - Part9 - Single Page

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