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rec.arts.bodyart: Tattoo FAQ 6/9--Care of new tattoos
Section - WHAT ARE SOME BAD THINGS FOR MY NEW TATTOO?

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Top Document: rec.arts.bodyart: Tattoo FAQ 6/9--Care of new tattoos
Previous Document: GENERAL ADVICE FROM A MEDICAL DOCTOR
Next Document: HOW DO I CARE FOR MY NEW TATTOO?
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SAUNA OR STEAMROOM

Once it is healed, there is very little that will screw up a tattoo. The
one exception is prolonged exposure to sunlight. (the other is scarring,
but that is patently obvious).

SUNLIGHT

Well, unfortunately it is. The newer inks are better at resisting fading
but whatever you do, if you spend lots of time in bright sunlight your
tats will fade (over a lifetime, not over a week). Best to try and keep
them out of bright sunlight. No one wants to become a cave dweller just
to keep their tats looking good, so just use some common sense. Think of
your tat as an investment--slather on that sunblock so it doesn't turn
into a dark blob.

Our culture has erroneously labeled the tan as healthy. Did you know
that your tan is your skin's way of dealing with the damage caused by
the sun? It's like the formation of a scab when you have a cut. You will
pay for your years of sun exposure when you are in your 40s and 50s.
Leathery, wrinkled, dry skin with freckles and liver spots. Melanoma.
Skin cancer. Regular visits to the dermatologist. Like I say, "There's
no such thing as a healthy tan!" Take it from a Hawaii local! I've seen
my share of melanoma here, and they're not even from surfers or beach
bunnies!

Some people have gotten angry at me about this, telling me that they
have a seasonal disorder that requires them to get some sun. A little
bit of sun is okay (and it gives you a dose of Vitamin D). But all you
need is a few minutes' worth.

Tanning booths are not good for you! They are not regulated by the FDA,
and the staff that work at these salons have been known to give out
patently false information. Many salon operators will suggest dosages
far exceeding industry recommendations, and the FDA would actually
prefer that these booths be banned altogether. Do not believe the salon
operators who tell you there is NO damage caused by their UV rays. There
are indications that tanning booths emit rays that cause the type of
damage that only shows up years later, when it is difficult to fault any
one operator. Their industry motto is "tan safe." There is no such thing
as a SAFE tan, folks. Sorry.

Kai says: IT IS TRUE THAT SUNTANNING TO A CONSIDERABLE EXTENT NOT ONLY
DAMAGES YOUR SKIN BUT FADES THE TATTOOS. The UV light rays that damage
skin can get below the outermost surface of the skin (that's why skin
cancers are promoted by excess suntanning).

The following is information about suncare and sunblock, as well as some
specific brand recommendations by RAB readers:
o Try to use products that do not clog your pores. If your sunblock 
  makes you break out or feel itchy, this may be the cause.
o Avoid sunblock containing PABA, apparently found to be carcinogenic.
o "SPF" stands for Sun Protection Factor. If you can normally stay out 
  for ten minutes without getting sunburnt, then an SPF 2 should protect
  you for 20 minutes, an SPF 6 for an hour, and so on. HOWEVER, this 
  does *NOT* mean an SPF 30 will let you stay out for five hours with 
  just one coat. Keep your exposure limited to the minimum amounts,
  and always use an extra strong sunblock with at least SPF 30 for your
  tattoo.
o "Waterproof" and "sweatproof" sunblocks protect you while in the 
  water. However, reflections from the water add to your exposure. Make 
  sure you use a high SPF number, and always re-apply your sunblock when
  coming out of the water.
o Sunblock is not just for the beach! Make it a habit to carry one with 
  you during the sunnier months so you can protect your tattoo always! 
  The Watermelon Stick from the Body Shop is nice and portable, but in a
  pinch, a tube of lip balm (Blistik, etc.) will work, as long as it has
  an SPF. Dab a bit on your tattoo whenever you will be outside.

Products recommended by some RABbits:
o Banana Boat for Kids - SPF 50.
o Banana Boat's SPF 50, for Extra Sesitive Skin
o "Deep Cover" Super Sunblock, advertised in some tattoo magazines 
  (distributed by Deep Cover in Long Beach, CA)
o The Body Shop's Watermelon Stick
o Bullfrog Moisturizing Formula - The Body Lotion (not the Gel Formula).
o Neutrogena's Senisitive Skin SPF 17
o Schering-Plough's "Shade Sunblock" in various SPFs.

PREPARATION-H HEMORRHOIDAL OINTMENT

We have heard stories of tattoo artists recommending the use of
Preparation-H in the healing of new tattoos. Preparation-H is a product
marketed for the relief of hemorrhoidal tissue in the US, and comes in
both cream and suppository form (I assume artists don't recommend the
suppositories).

Dr. Jeff Herndon <JHERNDON@Gems.VCU.EDU>, resident assistant professor
at the Department of Medicinal Chemistry at Virginia Commonwealth
University's Medical College, says Preparation-H should *NOT* be used
for tattoos:

 According to the 1995 Drug Facts & Comparisons (Olin, et al., Facts and
 Comparisons Inc.: St Louis, 1995; p 540-541) the list of ingredients 
 for Preparation-H are as follows:
 - Live yeast cell derivative supplying 2000 units of skin respiratory 
   factor per ounce
 - 3% shark liver oil
 - 1:10000 phenyl mercuric nitrate
  Facts and Comparisons goes on to say that shark liver oil (similar to 
 cod liver oil) is used primarily as a carrier of the active ingredients
 and as a protectant, forming a physical barrier on the skin. While this
 may be helpful in the healing of hemorroids, it provides no benefit and
 perhaps impedes the healing of new tattoos.
  Furthermore, while phenylmercuric nitrate may have antiseptic 
 properties (similar to mercurichrome or tincture of iodine; neither of 
 which should be used on fresh tattoos) it possesses very little anti-
 infective properties when compared to traditional antibacterial agents 
 (neosporin, baccitracin, etc.). Its use in such low quantities in 
 Preperation-H is possibly as a preservative (Facts and Comparisons, 
 1995, p. 540). 
  The active ingredient of Preparation-H is the skin respiratory factor 
 and this does nothing to relieve the itching and/or swelling associated
 with a new tattoo. In fact, it is best to simply keep the area moist 
 and clean and to avoid picking the scabs or 'onion skin peel' that 
 develop--and refrain from using Preparation-H. Not only will it NOT 
 help your tattoo, it will actually probably do more harm than good. The
 product was developed for hemorrhoidal tissue only.

Jeff adds simply: "I just can't figure why you'd want to spread yeast
cells on a tattoo."


User Contributions:

Yusuph
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 16, 2012 @ 12:00 am
I real to know much the history of tattoo, from the begin. Please send for me the all details/summary or imformation of tattoo. You can find me also on facebook as Toto mbata chico. Thank u

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Top Document: rec.arts.bodyart: Tattoo FAQ 6/9--Care of new tattoos
Previous Document: GENERAL ADVICE FROM A MEDICAL DOCTOR
Next Document: HOW DO I CARE FOR MY NEW TATTOO?

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