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rec.arts.bodyart: Piercing FAQ 2E--Genital Piercings & Their Suggested Jewelry

( PartA - PartB - PartC - PartD - PartE )
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Archive-name: bodyart/piercing-faq/jewelry/partE
Last-modified: May 01, 2000
Posting-frequency: Quarterly
URL: http://www.cs.uu.nl/wais/html/na-dir/bodyart/piercing-faq/.html

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
Summary: This posting contains information about body piercing. Anyone 
    interested in the subject and/or who wishes to read/post to 
    rec.arts.bodyart should read the Piercing FAQ first.

The rec.arts.bodyart Piercing FAQ is divided into 30 parts:

1--Introduction
2A--Jewelry Materials
2B--Jewelry Sizes & Designs
2C--Facial Piercings & Their Suggested Jewelry
2D--Body Piercings & Their Suggested Jewelry 
2E--Genital Piercings & Their Suggested Jewelry
3--Getting A New Piercing
4A--Professional Organizations, Piercing Instruction
4B--Professional Piercers - United States - Alabama - California
4C--Professional Piercers - United States - Colorado - Iowa
4D--Professional Piercers - United States - Kansas - Nevada
4E--Professional Piercers - United States - New Hampshire - North Dakota
4F--Professional Piercers - United States - Ohio - Pennsylvania
4G--Professional Piercers - United States - Rhode Island - Wyoming
4H--Professional Piercers - Canada
4I--Professional Piercers - Beyond N. America
4J--Professional Piercers - Beyond N. America Cont'd
5--Care Of New Piercings
6--The Healing Process & Healing Problems
7--Healed Piercings
8--Historical Information
9A--Resource List
9B--Resource List Cont'd
10A--Personal Experiences - Facial & Unisex Piercings
10B--Personal Experiences - Genital Piercings
10C--Personal Experiences - Genital Piercings Cont'd
10D--Personal Experiences - Genital Piercings Cont'd
11A--Jewelry Manufacturers
11B--Jewelry Manufacturers Cont'd
11C--Jewelry Manufacturers Cont'd

This section includes:

2E  Genital Piercings & Their Suggested Jewelry     
   2E.1 Female Piercings
   2E.2 Male Piercings
   2E.3 Genital Piercings and Sexual Activity
   2E.4 Genital Piercings and Pregnancy

All texts written and (c) 2000 by Anne Greenblatt unless otherwise
noted.
Please see Part 1 of the FAQ for information regarding copyright and
dissemination of the FAQ.

DISCLAIMER!  The Piercing FAQ contains material of a sexually explicit
nature. The information contained in the Piercing FAQ should not be
construed as medical advice.

The following contains brief descriptions of each piercing and suggested
jewelry. Healing times offered are estimates. Healing time and success
rates
vary for different people.


2E  GENITAL PIERCINGS & THEIR SUGGESTED JEWELRY

2E.1  FEMALE GENITAL PIERCINGS

All of the female genital piercings are highly anatomy-dependent. An
experienced piercer will be able to ascertain which piercings are
appropriate and likely to be successful.

The piercer may need to trim the pubic hair; shaving is not necessary.
Shaving can be very irritating if the piercee has never shaved or does
not
shave regularly. Trimming the hair allows the piercer to clean the area
thoroughly, mark the piercing between hair follicles, and apply forceps
without catching hair.

If a woman desires multiple piercings, placement must be decided with
reference to the placement of existing piercings. Outer labia piercings
can
pinch a hood or inner labia piercings.

CLITORIS PIERCING

4 to 6 weeks

Clitoris piercings are not performed as often as clitoral hood piercings
because few women are anatomically suited the piercing. The clitoris
piercing is not inherently dangerous as long as the clitoris is large
enough to support the piercing and the piercing is placed appropriately.
The clitoris must be at least 1/4" wide and the hood must not constrict
the jewelry. If the jewelry is constricted or twists under the hood the
piercing will migrate, reject or scar.

The glans clitoris contains as many nerve endings as the glans penis.
Nerve damage can result from piercing a clitoris that is too small or
from
piercing through the shaft of the clitoris and through the dorsal nerve.
Piercing through the shaft of the clitoris can also result in excessive
bleeding and blood loss to the clitoris.

An exposed clitoris may be pierced horizontally or vertically. If the
clitoris is hooded, the vertical piercing is more appropriate to avoid
twisting of the jewelry. Jewelry in a horizontal piercing is also
likely to
twist if the wearer's pubic area is narrow or if she has large outer
labia.
Rings are appropriate for horizontal piercings only if the clitoris is
exposed or very loosely hooded.

Some women seeking a clitoris piercing lack sensitivity because the
glans of
the clitoris is exposed and has become desensitized. A few women have
written that they have experienced spontaneous orgasms immediately after
piercing; this hyper-sensitivity usually decreases once the piercing
heals
and the clitoris grows accustomed to the presence of the jewelry.

Initial jewelry: Barbells in 16 to 14 gauge and 5/16" to 7/16" in
length;
the barbell should be 1/16" longer than the width of the piercing.
Captive
bead rings in 16 to 14 gauge and 5/16" to 7/16" in diameter.

FOURCHETTE

4 to 6 weeks

The fourchette piercing is named for its location. Highly anatomy
dependent,
this vertical piercing is made through no more than 3/8" of surface
tissue,
from the bottom wall of the vagina over the perineum. Placing the
piercing
into the vaginal canal tissue often results in rapid rejection. This
piercing is often uncomfortable for women who enjoy vaginal penetration
because the piercing is pulled into the vaginal canal.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 12 to 10 gauge and 1/2" to 5/8"
in
diameter. Straight and curved barbells in 12 to 10ga and 3/8" to 1/2" in
length.

HORIZONTAL CLITORAL HOOD PIERCING

4 to 6 weeks

The horizontal hood piercing is made through the pronounced vertical
ridge
of hood tissue approximately 3/8" to 1/2" above the edge of the hood.
The
horizontal piercing does not pass through the hood itself. Some women
do not
have enough loose tissue to support this piercing. The clitoris and hood
tend to retract when standing which may make the horizontal piercing
uncomfortable or inappropriate; the position of the piercing and the
ring
dimensions should be selected accordingly.

Placement of the piercing and selection of the ring dimensions should be
made so that the bead rests on the tip of the clitoris. The horizontal
piercing is most stimulating if the clitoris is exposed. If the
clitoris is
not exposed the wearer may not feel the ring unless pressure is applied
to
the jewelry. Larger beads (7/32" to 1/4") are more stimulating because
of
the greater weight and surface area.

The ring, as it passes through the piercing, can stimulate the shaft of
the
clitoris when pressure is applied. Larger gauge rings are more
stimulating
in this manner.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 14 to 10 gauge and 3/8" to 1/2"
in
diameter; the diameter should be at least 1/8" wider than the width of
the
piercing.

A thicker gauge should be considered if the wearer enjoys pressure or
friction during sex. A thicker gauge will be more comfortable and less
likely to pinch or tear.

Women with a narrow pubic area and/or large outer labia or whose thighs
compress the pubic area may find this piercing uncomfortable because the
ring will have a tendency to twist. In this case, a symmetrical teardrop
shaped ring is often more appropriate than a round ring. The tapered
shape
of the ring prevents it from getting caught between the outer labia and
painfully twisted and pulled which can cause the piercing to migrate or
tear
during healing. Most frequently used dimensions are 3/8" wide x 1/2"
long
and 1/2" x 5/8". Wearing a thicker gauge will also reduce the risk of
migration or tearing caused by twisting of the jewelry.

VERTICAL CLITORAL HOOD PIERCING

4 to 6 weeks

The vertical hood piercing made through the clitoral hood. The hood
must be
large enough to comfortably accommodate the jewelry. An easy way to
check
for comfort is with a lubricated cotton swab; if the entire cotton end
will
fit comfortably under the hood the jewelry will fit comfortably as well.

This piercing stimulates the clitoris directly. If the wearer finds
direct
touch uncomfortable, she will probably find the vertical hood piercing
uncomfortable. A vertical hood piercing is often chosen if the wearer
enjoys
direct contact and desires to increase sensation.

The vertical piercing is usually performed using a needle receiving tube
inserted between the hood and the clitoris, the piercing made from the
outside and into the tube.

A few women have reported becoming desensitized to the jewelry over an
extended period and that the jewelry is not as stimulating as it was
when
the piercing was new. In most cases the wearer simply becomes accustomed
to the feeling of the jewelry rather than the clitoris losing sensation.
Leaving the piercing empty for a few weeks usually makes the piercing
feel
like new when the jewelry is reinserted. Changing the jewelry from ring
to
barbell or vice versa can increase or decrease contact between the
jewelry
and the clitoris. Some women find barbells more stimulating; the bottom
ball rests on the clitoris and the top ball rests over the shaft of the
clitoris. Increasing the gauge often increases sensation.

Initial Jewelry: Captive bead rings in 14 to 10 gauge and 3/8" to 1/2"
in
diameter; the diameter should be approximately 1/16" wider than the
distance
between the tip of the hood and the piercing. Straight and curved
barbells
in 14 to 10 gauge and 5/16" to 1/2" long; the length should be
approximately
equal to the distance between the tip of the hood and the piercing so
that
the bottom ball protrudes from the hood. This length allows for
cleaning and
grasping the jewelry to check the security of the balls. Some women
prefer a
shorter barbell so that the ball is completely under the hood; the
barbell
can be shortened after the piercing has healed. Larger beads (7/32" to
1/4")
are more stimulating because of the greater weight and surface area.

A thicker gauge should be considered if the wearer enjoys pressure or
friction during sex. A thicker gauge will be more comfortable and less
likely to pinch or tear.

INNER LABIA

4 to 6 weeks

The size of the inner labia varies greatly. The labia must be at least
1/8"  thick to safely support the jewelry. Piercings should not be made
through the thin folds that are sometimes present. If the inner labia
protrude from the outer labia, the piercings should be placed so that
the rings are not pulled against the edges of the outer labia.

Inner labia piercings can be stretched easily.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 14 to 10 gauge and 7/16" to 5/8"
in
diameter; the diameter should be at least 1/16" wider than the distance
between the edge of the labia and the piercing. Circular barbells may
have a
tendency to unscrew with friction from walking.

A thicker gauge should be considered if the wearer enjoys pressure or
friction during sex. A thicker gauge will be more comfortable and less
likely to pinch or tear.

OUTER LABIA

4 to 6 months

Outer labia piercings are less likely to migrate or reject if the labia
is
very pronounced.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 12 to 10 gauge and 1/2" to 5/8"
in
diameter; the diameter of the ring should be at least 1/4" wider than
the
width of the piercing. No more than 1/4 of the ring should be through
the
piercing. A ring which is too small in diameter will constrict the
piercing
and cause the piercing to migrate and scar. Outer labia piercings often
swell considerably during the first 4 to 6 weeks, and the ring must be
wide
enough to accommodate swelling. Circular barbells may have a tendency to
unscrew with friction from walking. Straight or curved barbells are not
appropriate for new piercings because of the amount of swelling that
often
occurs.

Outer labia piercings are easily irritated by perspiration, lack of air
circulation, and friction against the wearer's clothing, thighs or the
opposite labia. Occasionally a ring or protrusion of soft, inflamed
tissue
will form around the entrances of the piercing. Keep the piercing as
dry as
possible and wear non-restrictive clothing that allows air circulation.
Usually the inflamed tissue recedes as the piercing heals.

TRIANGLE PIERCING

4 to 6 months

This piercing is made horizontally through the loose tissue under (not
below) the shaft of the clitoris, above the juncture of the inner labia
and
clitoral hood. The area to be pierced can be felt as a triangular shape
behind the shaft when the area is pinched with the fingers. The
piercing is
stimulating to the wearer when the ring is pulled, flipped up, or when
pressure is applied.

The Triangle piercing is very anatomy dependent. The clitoris and
surrounding tissue must protrude from the pubic bone to allow for a
comfortable piercing. The clitoris and hood tend to retract when
standing,
which may make the piercing uncomfortable or inappropriate; the
position of
the piercing and the ring dimensions should be selected accordingly.

Women with a narrow pubic area and/or large outer labia or whose thighs
compress the pubic area may find this piercing uncomfortable because the
ring will have a tendency to twist. In this case, a symmetrical teardrop
shaped ring is often more appropriate than a round ring. The tapered
shape
of the ring prevents it from getting caught between the outer labia and
painfully twisted and pulled which can cause the piercing to migrate or
tear
during healing. Most frequently used dimensions are 1/2" wide x 5/8"
long.
Wearing a thicker gauge will also reduce the risk of migration or
tearing
caused by twisting of the jewelry.

Initial Jewelry: Bead rings or captive bead rings in 12 to 10 gauge and
1/2"
to 5/8" in diameter; the diameter of the ring should be at least 1/4"
wider
than the width of the piercing. A ring which is too small in diameter
will
constrict the piercing and cause the piercing to migrate and scar.
Triangle
piercings often swell considerably during the first 4 to 6 weeks, and
the
ring must be wide enough to accommodate swelling.

CHRISTINA

4 to 6 months

The Christina is a vertical piercing made through the V-shaped juncture
of
the mons and outer labia. Because of the thickness of the tissue healing
time can be lengthy. This piercing is highly anatomy-dependent and
should be
performed only if a distinct ridge of tissue is available to support the
piercing. Often the area flattens or changes shape with leg movements;
placement and jewelry selection should be determined accordingly.
Because of
the friction and movement of the area, this piercing tends to migrate or
reject.

Initial Jewelry: Barbells in 12 to 10 gauge and 9/16" to 5/8" in
length; the
barbell should be 1/4" longer than the width of the piercing. Christina
piercings often swell considerably during the first 4 to 6 weeks, and
the
barbell must be wide enough to accommodate swelling. Because the
piercing is
usually at least 1/2" to 5/8" wide, a ring of large enough in diameter
will
protrude uncomfortably against clothing.

ISABELLA

This piercing was first documented in Issue #17 of Piercing World
Magazine
(UK). The safety of this piercing has been questioned by a number of
experienced piercers. As depicted this piercing is likely to sever the
dorsal nerve and artery of the clitoris which could cause a complete
loss of
sensation and excessive bleeding.

PRINCESS ALBERTINA

Another relatively new and experimental piercing documented in Issue
#19 of
Piercing World Magazine. The safety, not to mention viability, of this
piercing has been questioned by a number of experienced piercers in the
US.

In her "Editorial" in the Association of Professional Piercers
Newsletter
"The Point", Vol.1, No. 5 <http://www.safepiercing.org> Michaela Grey
writes:

"[This piercing] forces a ring into the tiny, extremely sensitive female
urethra and out through the hymen. As women do not have a man's large,
relatively exposed urethra, the area is not sturdy enough to withstand
minor
infections or the weight and friction of a ring. The female urinary
tract is
less than 2 inches long. An infection of the piercing could travel
rapidly
to the bladder and become quite serious. The piercing would not only be
very
uncomfortable but extremely dangerous."


2E.2  MALE GENITAL PIERCINGS

The Prince Albert, Ampallang and Apadravya piercings usually bleed and
occasionally bruise during the first 3 to 5 days.

AMPALLANG

6 to 10 months; may require a year or more to completely heal

The Ampallang is made horizontally through the glans (head). There is
some
debate among piercers regarding the placement of the Ampallang: whether
it
should be above or through the urethra. A piercing intersecting the
urethra is in effect two piercings. Piercers who prefer the
transurethral
piercing contend that a transurethral piercing tends to heal faster and
be
stronger than a piercing made above the urethra.

Initial jewelry: Barbells in 12 to 10 gauge. The length of the barbell
must
be determined by measuring the penis while it is erect.

APADRAVYA

6 to 10 months; may require a year or more to completely heal

The Apadravya is made vertically through the glans, in front of the
corona
(ridge of the glans), and is often a continuation of the Prince Albert.
Healing time can be less if the piercing is a continuation of the Prince
Albert. The Apadravya tends to heal faster than the Ampallang due to
irrigation with urine and because the Apadravya involves less tissue
than
the Ampallang.

Initial jewelry: Barbells in 12 to 10 gauge. The length of the barbell
must
be determined by measuring the penis while it is erect.

DYDOE

2 to 4 months

Dydoe piercings are usually done as a pair, at the 10 and 2 o'clock
positions
through the corona (ridge of the glans). Dydoe piercings are less
likely to migrate or reject if the corona is very pronounced.

Initial jewelry: Barbells in 14 gauge and 3/8" to 7/16" in length; the
barbell should be 1/16" longer than the width of the piercing. Curved
barbells are more appropriate if the corona is not very pronounced. Many
dydoe wearers find rings very uncomfortable.

FORESKIN

2 to 4 months

This piercing can be very stimulating as the jewelry rubs against the
glans.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 12 to 10 gauge and 1/2" to 5/8"
in
diameter; the diameter of the ring should be at least 1/8" wider than
the
width of the piercing when the foreskin is retracted. A ring which is
too
small in diameter will constrict the piercing and cause the piercing to
migrate and scar.

FRENUM

2 to 4 months

This piercing is made through the loose skin along the underside of the
shaft. The depth of the piercing should be made with regards to how much
tissue is available to support the jewelry. The frenulum itself, which
is
sometimes left intact after circumcision, is too thin to support
jewelry.
The width of the piercing is usually between 3/8" and 1/2" wide. It is
not
necessary for the penis to be erect during placement; however, the
placement may change when the penis is erect.

A series of frenum piercings is called a FRENUM LADDER. The skin of the
lower half of the penis tends to be thinner and tighter, increasing the
chance of migration or rejection. Tension is increased if the barbell
balls
exert pressure against the skin behind them.

A frenum piercing made at the base of the penis has acquired the name
LORUM,
short for "lower frenum."

If the wearer is uncircumcised the piercing is placed inside the
foreskin. A
ring is usually chosen to be more comfortable than a barbell. The
piercing
should not be made through only the frenulum which is too thin to suport
jewelry. Some uncircumcised men have naturally occurring holes through
the
frenulum.

Initial jewelry: Barbells in 12 to 10 gauge and 1/2" to 5/8" in length;
the
barbell should be 1/8" longer than the width of the piercing. Rings can
be
worn only if enough loose tissue is available. The diameter of the ring
should be at least 1/4" wider than the width of the piercing. No more
than
1/4 of the ring should be through the piercing. A ring which is too
small in
diameter will constrict the piercing and cause the piercing to migrate
and
scar.

After the piercing is healed, a large diameter ring which snugly
encircles
the penis behind the corona (ridge of the glans) can be worn if the
placement of the piercing allows. A frenum loop is a horse-shoe shaped
loop
of wide flat or round wire which can be attached to the barbell. Some
designs have balls soldered onto the outside of the loop to stimulate
the
wearer's partner.

GUICHE

4 to 6 months

The guiche piercing is made horizontally at the base of the scrotum,
through
the perineum, just in front of the position of the inseam of a pair of
pants. Attaching weights to this piercing is said to be extremely
stimulating.

An outward facing fold of loose skin is optimum for this piercing. For
most
men the area is flat which increases the risk of migration or rejection.

Guiche piercings can be difficult to heal because of friction and
pressure
against the wearer's thighs and pants. Guiche piercings are also easily
irritated by perspiration and lack of air circulation. Occasionally a
ring
or protrusion of soft, inflamed tissue will form around the entrances
of the
piercing. Keep the piercing as dry as possible and wear non-restrictive
clothing that allows air circulation. Usually the inflamed tissue
recedes as
the piercing heals.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 12 to 10 gauge and 9/16" to 5/8"
in
diameter; the diameter of the ring should be at least 1/4" wider than
the
width of the piercing. No more than 1/4 of the ring should be through
the
piercing. A ring which is too small in diameter will constrict the
piercing
and cause the piercing to migrate and scar. Guiche piercings can swell
considerably during the first 4 to 6 weeks, and the ring must be wide
enough
to accommodate swelling. Circular may have a tendency to unscrew with
friction from walking.

PRINCE ALBERT OR P.A.

2 to 4 months

The Prince Albert piercing placed on the underside of the penis behind
the
glans in the center of the triangle which can be visualized in the "V"
of
the glans. If a frenulum is present, the piercing should be made
slightly to
one side; the piercing is usually made on the opposite side of the
direction
the wearer "dresses" (the direction the penis leans in pants) to reduce
friction.

This piercing is usually performed with the aid of a needle receiving
tube
inserted into the urethra; the piercing is made from the outside and
pushed
into the tube far enough that the tip of the needle is outside of the
urethra when the tube is removed. Some piercers have devised alternate
methods of piercing from the inside out.

It is possible to have a successful P.A. piercing if the wearer is not
circumcised. A curved barbell is suggested if the foreskin is not loose
enough to accommodate a ring. Pressure exerted by the foreskin on a ring
often causes the piercing to migrate or reject. If the foreskin is too
tight
to be completely retracted, the bottom edge of the foreskin can be cut
or
removed. This procedure can, in some cases, be considered medically
necessary if the foreskin is so restrictive that it is painful during
erection or sexual activity. This procedure should be performed by a
physician.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 10 gauge and 5/8" to 3/4" in
diameter; the diameter of the ring should be 1/8" wider than the
distance between the piercing and the urethral opening. A ring which is
too small in diameter will constrict the piercing and possibly tear the
urethra when the penis is erect.

Curved barbells in 10 gauge and 1/2" to 3/4" in length; the length
should be
approximately equal to or 1/16" longer than the distance between the
piercing and the urethral opening. The ball at the urethral end should
be
large enough to prevent it from slipping into the urethra.

The piercing itself will not leak when the wearer urinates unless the
piercing has been stretched beyond the thickness of the ring. The urine
drip
that is associated with the PA is a result of the urine dripping from
the
jewelry. Turning the penis 90 to 180 degrees while holding the ring to
the
side often prevents dripping.

It is not uncommon for a Prince Albert piercing to stretch two or more
gauges within the first year with frequent sexual activity or heavy
jewelry. Wearing jewelry that is too thin or too heavy can cause the
urethral lining to deteriorate

The REVERSE PRINCE ALBERT piercing is made through the top of the glans,
usually about 3/8" to 1/2 from the top edge of the urethral opening.

The DOLPHIN is essentially two Prince Albert piercings with a single
piece
of jewelry, usually a curved or U-shaped barbell. Because the second
piercing may be fairly deep into the shaft, it may take longer to heal
than
a standard Prince Albert piercing and may cause urethral irritation and
swelling.

SCROTUM / HAFADA

4 to 6 months

While piercings can be made anywhere on the scrotum, piercings made
through
an outward facing fold of loose skin are more successful. The piercing
must
not puncture the testicle sac itself which can lead to very serious
infection.

Scrotum piercings can be difficult to heal. The scrotum expands and
contracts which exerts stress on the entrances of the piercing. Scrotum
piercings are easily irritated by perspiration, lack of air
circulation, and
friction against the wearer's clothing, thighs and penis. Occasionally a
ring or protrusion of soft, inflamed tissue will form around the
entrances
of the piercing. Keep the piercing as dry as possible and wear
non-restrictive clothing that allows air circulation. Usually the
inflamed
tissue recedes as the piercing heals.

Initial jewelry: Captive bead rings in 14 to 10 gauge and 9/16" to
11/16" in
diameter; the diameter of the ring should be at least 1/4" wider than
the
width of the piercing. No more than 1/4 of the ring should be through
the
piercing. A ring which is too small in diameter will constrict the
piercing
and cause the piercing to migrate and scar. Scrotum piercings can swell
considerably during the first 4 to 6 weeks, and the ring must be wide
enough
to accommodate swelling.

2E.3  GENITAL PIERCINGS AND SEXUAL ACTIVITY

Genital piercings are intended to enhance sensation for the wearer and,
in
the case of male piercings, his partner during intercourse. However,
wearing
genital jewelry does require caution during certain activities,
particularly
if the piercing has not yet completely healed. In some cases, the
desired
activity can be impeded by the jewelry.

New piercings do not prohibit sexual activity. However, exposure to the
partner's bodily fluids must be prevented to reduce the risk of
infection,
even in a monogamous relationship. Numerous microorganisms, including
bacterias and yeasts, are present in genital and oral cavities. Saliva
should not be used as a lubricant for masturbation or intercourse while
the piercing is healing. Both partners should wash their hands before
touching the jewelry or the piercing. Latex barriers (condoms, dental
dams) should be used during all genital-genital or oral-genital contact.
After piercings have completely healed, they are no longer susceptible
to
infection and are no more susceptible to transmitting and contracting
disease-causing organisms than the surrounding skin (mucous membranes
are
naturally more susceptible). However, piercings can be injured by
strenuous activity or recent stretching; minute and non-visible tears
within the piercing which yields the piercing susceptible to infection
and
and disease transmission.

In the case of Prince Albert, Ampallang and Apadravya piercings,
erection or
orgasm may cause the piercing to bleed during the first week. Strenuous
sexual activity during the healing period may prolong healing and cause
uncomfortable scarring.

Penis piercings with average-sized jewelry rarely interfere with the
safe
use of condoms. Condoms with larger receptical ends will fit comfortably
over penis jewelry. Lubricating the inside of the condom as well as the
jewelry itself will reduce friction. Diaphrams and cervical caps can be
dislodged by curved barbells or circular barbells worn in the Prince
Albert
piercing.

Penis jewelry rarely impedes comfortable male-female intercourse.
Comfort
and stimulation are greatly influenced by the position of intercourse
and
the relative dimensions of the penis and vagina. Discomfort to either
partner can often be alleviated by changing the dimensions or style of
the
jewelry. Some women find piercings with barbells, such as frenum,
Apadravya
and Ampallang piercings, uncomfortable. Shortening the barbell or
wearing
smaller barbell balls may reduce discomfort. A frenum barbell may be
substituted by a ring. A large diameter ring which snugly encircles the
penis behind the corona (ridge of the glans) can be worn if the
placement of
the piercing allows.

Discomfort caused by friction against the jewelry or friction within the
piercing can be alleviated by applying a water based lubricant to the
jewelry.

Exerting pressure or pulling on jewelry that is too thin will be
uncomfortable and may injure or tear the piercing. The thicker the
jewelry,
the more surface area over which pressure is distributed. The depth of
the
piercing should also be considered; a shallow piercing is more likely to
tear or be injured.

Most men have found that penis piercings 12ga or thinner tend to be
uncomfortable or pinch during sexual activity. Once the piercing has
been
stretched to a thicker gauge the pinching sensation disappears.

There is no evidence that piercings of the penis cause urinary tract
infections in either partner.

On rare ocassions penis jewelry has been known to chip teeth or become
lodged in the partner's throat during oral sex.


2E.4 GENITAL PIERCINGS AND PREGNANCY

In the interest of safety for the mother and child, jewelry should be
removed in case of a complicated birth. The jewelry could get in the
way of
emergency procedures should the need arise. Your doctor or midwife may
feel
uncomfortable working with the jewelry in place.

Some piercings are in danger of tearing when the vaginal opening
widens. A
Fourchette piercing will probably not survive the birthing process.
Horizontal hood and Triangle piercings may stretch uncomfortably and be
more
likely to tear with the jewelry in place.

One woman comments:

"From long experience I can tell you that the properly placed labia
piercing(s) can indeed stay in throughout the pregnancy and labor and
delivery. I was pierced before I ever imagined having children and when
twice blessed wore the jewelry through both pregnancies and deliveries.
However, I had a midwife for my prenatal care and delivery and she
didn't
bat an eye on any exam, but was somewhat confused when she felt the
jewelry
during delivery because I was in an unusual position and she couldn't
see
what was going on. However, no mention of removal was made, so they
stayed
in. I would bet that a midwife would be more receptive to allowing the
jewelry to stay put, because as a general rule midwives are fairly
accepting
of women and their life choices."


-- 
--

                              Anne Greenblatt
                Manager of the rec.arts.bodyart Piercing FAQ
                             Piercing Exquisite
                      http://www.piercingexquisite.com

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM