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Toyota Tundra FAQ


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Archive-name: autos/toyota-faq/tundra
url: www.tundrasolutions.com
Copyright: (c) 2000, 2001 by Steve Yee, All rights reserved
Posting-frequency: monthly (15th of the month)
Last-modified: 15 July 2001

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
Toyota Tundra FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

7/15/01

Maintained by Steve Yee.  

Send comments, suggestions, corrections, and additions to: 
sgyee@sprynet.com.

Copyright Notice and Distribution Permission
 
This FAQ is Copyright (c) 2000, 2001 by Steve Yee, All Rights Reserved 

This FAQ and the Author are in no way employed by or otherwise has any relation 
with Toyota Motor Corporation

Toyota, Toyota Tundra, and Tundra are trademarks and servicemarks of Toyota 
Motor Corporation.  All Rights Reserved.  

Indiglo is a registered trademark owned and licensed by Indiglo Corporation.

Permission is granted to freely distribute this document in it's entirety via 
email, usenet posting, BBS, on-line service, or hard copy.

Distribution for profit or financial gain is not permitted.

Distribution in commercial collections, compilations, or books without express 
permission from the author is not permitted.

Excerpts of the FAQ may be reproduced only if the following copyright notice 
appears with the excerpt:
 
Toyota Tundra FAQ Copyright (c) 2000, 2001 by Steve Yee.

You can retrieve this FAQ in the following ways:

Web:
www.tundrasolutions.com
www.faqs.org 

FTP:
rtfm.mit.edu 

USENET:
alt.autos.toyota
alt.autos.toyota.trucks
alt.answers 
news.answers 


Subject:  Table of Contents

0.0 - Disclaimer

0.1 - Purpose of this FAQ
0.2 - Thanks, credits, etc.
0.3 - How do I view this FAQ ?
0.4 - Why did it say "BETA" on this FAQ ?
0.5 - Why are there numbers or the word "All" after each subject line ?

1.0 - What is the Toyota Tundra ?  Specifications, versions, etc.
1.1 - 2000/01 Model year specifications
1.2 - What's different in the 2001 model year Tundras
1.3 - What is the Sequoia ?
1.4 - How Safe is the Tundra ?
1.5 - Is it an import, or is it an American truck ?
1.6 - What is TRD ?
1.7 - What can I get from TRD ?
1.8 - What is this Tundra Double Cab that I am hearing about ?

2.0 - Buying a Tundra	
2.1 - Online
2.2 - Comparisons
2.3 - What does the "Motor Trend Truck of The Year" award mean?
2.4 - What's the difference between Base, SR5, and Limited ?
2.5 - What does 'SR5' mean anyways ?  (Toyota Historical Background)

3.0 - Modifications to the Tundra and general questions answered.
3.1 - Changing the headlight bulbs
3.2 - HID style Headlamps
3.3 - Fix the back seat angle
3.4 - Bed Extender
3.5 - Spray In Bed Liner vs. Drop In Bed Liners
3.6 - K&N Filters, TRD Filters
3.7 - Towing Hitches
3.8 - Jack problems
3.9 - Oil Dipstick: Burrs and length
3.10 - Bug deflectors/paint protection
3.11 - Seat Covers
3.12 - Suspension/Body Lift Kits
3.13 - Lowering Kits
3.14 - Superchargers
3.15 - White or Indiglo(tm) style Gauges
3.16 - Horn add-ons
3.17 - Compass Mirrors
3.18 - Adding a remote to the RS3000 alarm
3.19 - Removing Stickers, emblems, and badges
3.20 - Brush/Light guards/Step Bars
3.21 - Help !  I got dimples on my tailgate !
3.22 - My Tundra is Drooling ! (Coolant spill)
3.23 - I'm stuck with only one Differential !
3.24 - I don't like the small tires on my 4x4 Tundra.  What can I do ?
3.25 - I hate Daytime Running Lamps.  Can I disconnect them ?
3.26 - What is this "clay" stuff?  Does this mean I put a mud mask on my truck?
3.27 - What do I "feed" my Tundra ? (Gas)
3.28 - What is this plastic stuff under my truck ? (Skid Plates)
3.29 - Oil Gauges
3.30 - I'm missing a lock ?  How do I get one ? (Glove Compartment)
3.31 - My Doors are out of control and fling open (or slam shut) on a hill !  
Is there a fix for it ?
3.32 - What is the difference between "hub centric" and "bolt or lug centric" 
rims ?
3.33 - My Cruise Control is running erratically.  What's causing it ?
3.34 - I've seen these mirrors that blink as the turn signal blinks.  What are 
they ?
3.35 - My Air Conditioning isn't blowing cold.  Why is this happening ?
3.36 - Can I fix the two power outlets to stay on when the ignition is off ?
3.37 - Exhaust/Header Upgrades
3.38 - How come my California Tundra is mising horsepower ?
3.39 - My door locks will unlock and my lights will turn on.  Why is this 
happening ?
3.40 - How do I shut off my door beeper ?
3.41 - What are these black "tracks" on the roof of the Tundra ?
3.42 - I hear this noise when I first start to move my Tundra, what is it ?
3.43 - How often do I need to use my 4x4 system ?
3.44 - What are these brown spots on my paint ?
3.45 - Boy...what is that smell ? (Air Conditioning odors)
3.46 - I want some ground shaking bass in my Tundra...how can I do this ?
3.47 - I'd like to get the repair manuals for my Tundra.  Where can I get some 
?
3.48 - My Brake Pedal is squeaking...how can I fix it ?
3.49 - What is this empty black button ?  (Clutch Disengage Switch)
3.50 - What is this tapping sound ?
3.51 - My fabric based tonneau cover keeps flapping around.  Why is that ?
3.52 - Can I get better brakes for the Tundra ?
3.53 - What is a throttle body spacer ?
3.54 - Can I tow a fifth wheel with my Tundra ?
3.55 - My seat belts don't retract.  Why does this happen ?
3.56 - Can I put a snow plow on my Tundra ?
3.57 - Can I pressure wash my engine ?
3.58 - How many crossmembers does the Tundra have, 8 or 9 ?
3.59 - Can I add these clear lamp covers to my Tundra ?
3.60 - How does my 4x4 really work ?
3.61 - How do I adjust my headlights ?
3.62 - Where is my Tachometer ? 
3.63 - Where can I get a new ignition system for my Tundra ?
3.64 - Why does my cargo light shut off when the truck is moving ?
3.65 - I have a leather interior.  What do I clean it with ?
3.66 - How do I make my high beams and fog lamps stay on at the same time ?

4.0 - Known Problems
4.1 - Wheel/Tire Slippage
4.2 - Brake problems (TSB Available)
4.3 - Vibration Problems
4.4 - Tire Pressure
4.5 - Oil Dipstick/Oil Levels
4.6 - Bushings
4.7 - Driveline "clunks"
4.8 - Tundra Not Starting ?
4.9 - Door Rattles
4.10 - Arm Rest wear
4.11 - Paint wear
4.12 - Trailer Wiring Harness Problems
4.13 - Rear Brake adjustment problems
4.14 - 4x4 Actuator Rod problem
4.15 - 60/40 Bench Seat TSB
4.16 - Misaligned drive shaft

4.90 - What is a TSB ?
4.91 - What is a recall ?
4.96 - Unlisted Technical Service Bulletins
4.97 - Technical Service Bulletins from the Web
4.98 - Technical Service Bulletins
4.99 - Recalls

5.0 - Where can I find resources ?
5.1 - Web Sites
5.2 - USENET
5.3 - Internet Relay Chat

6.0 - Revision History

----


Subject: 0.0 - Disclaimer
All the information contained in this document is provided for the convenience 
of current and prospective Tundra owners.  All information is accurate as well 
as can be reasonably verified.  There are no guarantees or warranties stated or 
implied through the distribution of this information.  Use the information in 
this document at your own risk, and no liability shall be given to the 
author(s), owner(s), or provider(s).  Any damage or loss is the sole 
responsibility of the owner of the vehicle.

Any and all modifications will likely cause a vehicle to behave differently 
than the stock vehicle - some modifications may significantly increase your 
risk when driving the vehicle or be dangerous in certain driving conditions and 
situations. Use your brain and good judgement when engaging in any activity or 
making any modifications. Do not take unwise risks, consult a certified 
professional if you are not sure of something.  Ensure you have all the 
necessary materials, tools, and anything else required to perform the 
process(es) that are listed here in the FAQ or on links listed in the FAQ.. 

Subject: 0.1 - Purpose of the FAQ
The purpose of this FAQ is to help Toyota Tundra owners be aware of known 
answers to popular questions in regards to the Toyota Tundra.  This FAQ was 
first written in August of 2000, and is maintained by Steve Yee 
(sgyee@sprynet.com).

Subject: 0.2 - Thanks, credits, etc.
I would like to exclusively thank the following sites for information that has 
been reproduced in this FAQ, either verbatim or paraphrased.

Toyota Motor Corp, USA.  www.toyota.com
Tundra Solutions. www.tundrasolutions.com
Big Toy Trucks - www.bigtoytrucks.com
USENET Forums - alt.autos.toyota, alt.autos.toyota.trucks
Marshall Brain's HowStuffWorks.com - www.howstuffworks.com

All information listed in this FAQ have come from sources listed in section 5.1 
of this FAQ.

Subject: 0.3 - How do I view this FAQ ?

This FAQ was written using the most powerful of Word Processors ever created 
for public consumption:  Microsoft Windows Notepad.  Please utilize Notepad or 
some other sort of Text Editing software with Word Wrap On.  This document has 
been tested and written using a window size of 640x480 pixels in a Windows 2000 
Advanced Server Terminal Environment.

Subject: 0.4 - Why did this FAQ say "BETA" on it ?

This FAQ was in a Beta form until the FAQ received approval for release in the 
news.answers and alt.answers newsgroups.  As of Sunday, Feb. 11, this FAQ was 
approved for general submission into the alt.answers and news.answers 
newsgroups.

Subject: 0.5 - Why are there numbers or the word "All" after each subject line 
?

The reasoning for this is to show which model year Tundra this modification 
applies to.  Some apply only for Model Year 2000, 2001, or All Tundra model 
years.

-----
Subject: 1.0 - What is the Toyota Tundra ?

History - The Toyota Tundra is Toyota Motor Corporation's second attempt at 
producing a full size truck for the American marketplace.  It's predecessor is 
the Toyota T-100.  (The T-100 never really took off in the American market due 
to two primary reasons:  A V6 Engine was the biggest you could get, and the 
truck was not made in America, so it was subject to heavy import tariffs.)

Prototypes of the Tundra was released to Toyota Motorsports particpants (PPI 
Racing with Ivan Stewart, and Rod Millen Motorsports) in 1998, starting rumor 
mills worldwide as to the possible replacement of the T-100.  It first began as 
an engine upgrade to the existing T-100 racing variant from a V6 to a V8.

Publically introduced in it's closest current form at various motor shows from 
1998 to 1999, the Toyota Tundra was originally called the "T-150".  Caught in a 
blizzard of bad press from both Ford Motor Corporation (who thought it would 
confuse people with the F150) and automotive critics, the name was changed to 
Tundra.  To read an article on the T-150 and see pictures of a concept T-150, 
the New England TTORA (Tacoma Territory Off Roader's Association) has a copy of 
the article at http://webm3233.ntx.net/putnam/ttora/junk/t150.htm .

The 2000 and 2001 model year Tundras are half ton, full size pickups.  They can 
be purchased in the following combinations:

2dr 4x2 Regular Cab Base 
2dr 4x2 Access Cab SR5 
4dr 4x2 Access Cab SR5 V8 
4dr 4x2 Access Cab LTD V8 
2dr 4x4 Regular Cab SR5 
2dr 4x4 Regular Cab SR5 V8 
4dr 4x4 Access Cab SR5 
4dr 4x4 Access Cab SR5 V8 
4dr 4x4 Access Cab LTD V8 

All Tundras share the same frame and wheelbase, therefore, only a limited 
number of configurations are available compared to other manufacturers.  There 
are no larger configurations with heaver payload capacity.

Subject: 1.1 - 2000/01 Model Year Specifications

This comes from the Toyota Motor Corporation web page at www.toyota.com

Regular Cab (4x2 only)
Engine
3.4-liter DOHC 24-valve EFI V6 

Transmission
5-speed manual overdrive - standard
4-speed electronically controlled transmission (ECT)

STANDARD FEATURES
* Aerodynamic multi-reflector halogen headlamps with auto-off feature 
* High Solar Energy-Absorbing (HSEA) glass 
* Dual black outside mirrors 
* Painted front bumper and grille 
* Rear center high-mount stop lamp (CHMSL) with integrated cargo lamp 
* Locking fuel filler door with cap holder 
* Removable locking tailgate 
* P245/70R16 tires on steel wheels 
* Fabric bench seat with vertically adjustable headrests and fold-down center 
armrest 
* Driver and front passenger air bag Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) with 
passenger-side cutoff switch2 
* Cut-pile carpeting 
* Speedometer, LCD odometer with twin tripmeters, fuel level and coolant 
temperature gauges 
* Dual cup holders 
* Driver and passenger sun visors 
* Mist-cycle windshield wipers 
* Dual 12-volt auxiliary power outlets 
* Digital quartz clock 
* Deluxe AM/FM ETR/Cassette with 4 speakers 

Regular Cab SR5 (4x4 only)
Engine
4.7-liter DOHC 32-valve EFI i-Force V8 

Transmission
4-speed electronically controlled transmission (ECT) 

Additional Standard Features (in addition to/in place of Regular Cab features) 
* Chrome body side molding insert, grille, and front and rear bumpers 
* Color-keyed outside door handles 
* P245/70R16 tires on styled steel wheels 
* Front and rear mudguards 
* Variable intermittent windshield wipers 
* Cruise control 
* Tachometer 
* Driver and passenger sun visors with extensions 
* Touch-Select 4-wheel-drive system 
* Defroster-linked CFC-free air conditioning 
* Tilt steering wheel 
* Deluxe AM/FM ETR/Cassette with 4 speakers 

Access Cab SR5
Engine
3.4-liter DOHC 24-valve EFI V6
4.7-liter DOHC 32-valve EFI i-Force V8 - available 

Transmission
5-speed manual overdrive - standard on V6, not available with i-Force V8
4-speed electronically controlled transmission (ECT) - available with V6, 
standard with i-Force V8 

Additional Standard Features (in addition to/in place of Regular Cab SR5 
features) 
* Tilt-out rear quarter windows with privacy glass 
* Front fabric 60/40 split-bench seat with vertically adjustable headrests and 
fold-down center console armrest with dual cup holders (automatic models) 
* Front fabric captain's chairs with vertically adjustable headrests (manual 
models) 
* Rear 60/40 split-bench with vertically adjustable headrests and fold-down 
center armrest with dual cup holders 
* 4WDemand 4-wheel-drive system (V6 4WD models) 
* Touch-Select 4-wheel-drive system (V8 4WD models) 

V8 Access Cab Limited
Engine
4.7-liter DOHC 32-valve EFI i-Force V8 

Transmission
4-speed electronically controlled transmission (ECT) - standard

Additional Standard Features (in addition to/in place of Access Cab SR5 
features)
* Color-keyed fender flares with integrated mudguards, front bumper and body 
side molding 
* Fog lamps 
* Power color-keyed exterior mirrors 
* Sliding rear window with privacy glass 
* P265/70R16 tires on 5-spoke aluminum alloy wheels 
* Power windows and door locks 
* Lighting Package 
* Illuminated driver and passenger dual sun visors with extensions 
* Touch-Select 4-wheel-drive system (4WD models) 
* Deluxe 3-in-1 AM/FM ETR/Cassette/CD with 6 speakers 

Regular Cab Options (4x2 only)
* All-Weather Guard Package - heavy-duty battery, starter, heater and anti-chip 
paint 
* Fog lamps 
* 4-wheel Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) - includes Daytime Running Lights 
(DRL) 
* Full wheel covers 
* Mudguards 
* Sliding rear window 
* Painted rear bumper 
* Tilt steering wheel - includes variable intermittent windshield wipers 
* Defroster-linked CFC-free air conditioning 
* Delete Package option - replaces fabric seats and cut-pile carpeting with 
vinyl 

Access Cab SR5 Options
* All-Weather Guard Package - heavy-duty battery, starter, heater 
* Fog lamps 
* 4-wheel Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) - includes Daytime Running Lights 
(DRL) 
* Styled steel wheels with P265/70R16 tires and chrome wheel arch molding 
* Styled steel wheels with P265/70R16 tires and black fender flares with 
integrated mudguards 
* 3-spoke aluminum alloy wheels with P245/70R16 tires 
* 5-spoke aluminum alloy wheels with P265/70R16 tires and chrome wheel arch 
molding 
* 5-spoke aluminum alloy wheels with P265/70R16 tires and black fender flares 
with integrated mudguards 
* TRD Off-Road Package  - off-road tuned suspension, 
Bilstein(r) shock absorbers, BFGoodrich P265/70R16 tires on 5-spoke aluminum 
alloy wheels, black fender flares with integrated mudguards and fog lamps 
* Captain's chairs (automatic models, standard on manual models) 
* Convenience Package - power windows and door locks, chrome power mirrors, 
cruise control (standard on V8), driver and passenger dual sun visors with 
vanity 
mirror, Lighting Package and sliding rear window with privacy glass 
* Style Package (V8 4x2 model only) - 3-spoke aluminum alloy wheels with 
P245/70R16 tires and captain's chairs 
* Deluxe 3-in-1 AM/FM ETR/Cassette/CD with 6 speakers 

V8 Access Cab Limited Options
* All-Weather Guard Package - heavy-duty battery, starter, heater 
* 4-wheel Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) - includes Daytime Running Lights 
(DRL) 
* Captain's chairs 
* Leather Trim Package - includes leather-trimmed captain's chairs with power 
adjustable driver seat and wood-grain-style interior trim 
* TRD Off-Road Package  - off-road tuned suspension, Bilstein 
(r) shock absorbers, BFGoodrich P265/70R16 tires on 5-spoke aluminum alloy 
wheels 
* Premium 3-in-1 AM/FM ETR/Cassette/6-disc CD changer with 6 speakers 

SAFETY FEATURES
* Driver and front outboard passenger air bag Supplemental Restraint System 
(SRS)2 with passenger air bag cutoff switch 
* 3-point ALR/ELR seatbelts in all outboard positions (driver seatbelt with ELR 
only) with front outboard passenger seatbelt reminder light 
* 2-point center lap belt on front bench and split-bench seats (all models) and 
rear split-bench seats (Access Cab models) 
* Front seatbelt pretensioners with force limiters 
* Adjustable front outboard seatbelt anchors 
* Vertically adjustable headrests in all outboard positions 
* Energy-absorbing steering column 
* Ladder frame with impact-absorbing front structure 
* Side-impact door beams 
* Rear center high-mount stop lamp (CHMSL) 
* Available 4-wheel Anti-lock Brake System (ABS), includes Daytime Running 
Lights (DRL) 

ACCESSORIES 
* Front-end mask 
* Running boards 
* Bed mat 
* Bedliner 
* Soft tonneau cover 
* Bed cargo net 
* Spare tire lock 
* Towing accessories (hitch, wire harness) 
* Wheel locks 
* Air conditioning (V6 models only) 
* Cab cargo net (for Regular Cab models) 
* Carpeted floor mats 
* Sport floor mats 
* Toyota Vehicle Intrusion Protection (VIP) RS3000 Security System 
* CD deck 
* 6-disc in-dash CD changer 


Subject: 1.2 - What's different in the 2001 and 2002 model year Tundras ?

According to the postings at www.tundrasolutions.com, the following changes 
will be available for the 2001 model year Tundras:

New standard bed-rail caps for all Access Cabs

Tailgate Cap in the regular bed PU. Improves the truck's appearance and 
protects the bed finish.

Painted rear bumper on 4x2 BASE models standard, so now all Tundras will have a 
standard rear bumper.

V6 models are now built with upgraded alternators (from 70 AMP to 80AMP) and 
all V6 Tundras will all have 50 State emissions. 

There is also a new full color-keyed package available on the Limited models 
(front grille surround, front bumper, lower valance, and rear bumper). 

SR5's available with premium 3-in-one 6-disc in dash changer (like 2000 Limited 
EJ codes). 

OF (offroad package cars) can be ordered on a 2WD SR5 now.  (This means that 
there will be a PreRunner type package for the Tundras, just like the Tacomas.  
Ed.)

Two new exterior colors available: silver sky metallic and desert sand metallic 
(deleted are platinum metallic, golden sand, and autumn red mica). 

MSRP increases an average of 1.7 - 2.0%. 

Option pricing changes are minimal due to the introduction of "value packages" 
for certain models. 

"Destination Charge" on the MSRP is renamed: "Delivery, Processing, and 
Handling Fee".

According to some 2001 Tundra owners, the rear seat also has additional padding 
for a slightly improved seat angle.

The 2002 Tundra has some minor color changes, and the Limited Slip Differential 
option (code LD) will be available for SR5's as a standard option without ABS.  
Code LD can be combined with other options if you factory order it.

Subject: 1.3 - What is the Sequoia ?

The Toyota Sequoia is a Sport Utility Vehicle that will be based on the Tundra 
frame.  Originally shown in various automotive shows in 1999 and 2000, the 
Sequoia will be larger than the 4Runner, and is roughly the same size as the 
Land Cruiser.  Average Retail List will be around $35000.  The Land Cruiser 
will still be around as the "ultimate" Toyota SUV, however, due to it's 
all-wheel drive and it's reputation.  Toyota has mentioned that it will not 
discontinue the Land Cruiser to make way for the Sequoia.  At this time, there 
is no planned Toyota Racing Development Package for 4x2 or 4x4 Sequoias.

Engine components and driveline components will be similar to the Tundra.  The 
Sequoia shares some of the same sheet metal (hood, front doors, front quarter 
panels, etc) with the Tundra.  The Sequoia does have a more active drivetrain, 
complete with slip detection and traction control.  The Sequoia also has 4 
wheel disc brakes.

Be aware that some dealerships at this time of writing may and can charge up to 
$10,000 extra for a Sequoia due to demand.

Subject: 1.4 - How Safe is the Tundra ?

Pretty safe for a full size Truck.  According to the National Transportation 
Safety Board, the Tundra gets a four out of five star rating for the driver, 
the passenger gets a three out of five star rating.  

The ratings are generated from a test in which a real Access Cab Tundra was 
crashed into a fixed barrier (it's a concrete wall) at 35MPH.  The test dummies 
inside the Tundra are then taken out, and insturmentation inside the test 
dummies are then analyzed as to how hard the crash was to the occupants.

The star rating denotes that the driver will have a 11-20% chance of a serious 
injury, and the passenger will have a 21-35% chance of a serious injury (the 
2001 has equal ratings for driver and passenger of 11-20%).  The ratings take 
into account the following items:

- Probability of a head injury
- Probability of a femur (leg) fracture
- Probability of a chest injury

On 6/4/01, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rated the Tundra the 
safest full sized light truck.  The IIHS uses a 40mph offset crash test, which 
is different from the test that the NTSB uses.

For more information, view the NTSB web site at www.ntsb.gov, or the IIHS at 
www.hwysafety.org.

Subject: 1.5 - Is it an import, or is it an American truck ?

The Tundra's engine parts and some other parts are probably the only thing that 
is assembled in Japan.  The truck itself is assembled in a new multi-million 
dollar facility in Princeton, Indiana.  According to Toyota's web site, the 
engine is produced in West Virginia and will be produced in a new facility 
somewhere else in the United States.

The reasoning for assembling the truck in the United States is two-fold.  One 
is to avoid the large import tariffs that occur when you import something from 
Japan.  BMW did something similar to make their new X-series SUV, and 
Mercedes-Benz (now DaimlerChrysler) did the same thing to make their ML320/420 
series.  The second is to appeal to American buyers, who are one of the most 
loyal truck buyers in the world.  The "Buy American" statement can now be 
applied to the Tundra.

Subject: 1.6 - What is TRD ?

TRD stands for Toyota Racing Development.  They are a semi-independent design, 
engineering, production, and marketing arm of Toyota.  Working hand in hand 
with Toyota Motorsports, TRD produces and distributes parts that can be added 
to your Toyota vehicle that increases the performance, handling, looks, etc of 
any Toyota vehicle.

Many vehicles, the Tundra included, come from the Toyota factory or distributor 
port with some of these TRD Parts installed.

There are three offshoots of TRD.  One is L-Tuned, a specific arm of TRD that 
handles nothing but Lexus modifications.  Lexus is the luxury arm of Toyota 
Motor Corporation.  The other is Kazuma, which is the professional racing parts 
distribution arm of TRD.  The third is TRD Sport Parts, which is the "common" 
TRD Parts distribution arm.

One big side benefit to TRD parts is that if you purchase TRD parts and have a 
dealer install them, the parts will be covered under the balance of your 
manufacturer's warranty.

You can reach TRD at www.trdusa.com.  Kazuma can be found at 
www.kazumaparts.com.  TRD Sport Parts can be found at www.trdsportparts.com.  
L-Tuned can be found at www.l-tuned.com.

Subject: 1.7 - What can I get from TRD ?

Listed below is a list of what you can add to your Tundra.  This list was 
compiled from www.kazumaparts.com and www.trdsportparts.com .  Descriptions are 
posted where available.

Limited Slip Differential:
00647-41301-100 LSD, Tundra, T100, Tacoma V6, 8" R.G.  Eaton Design & Mfg., 
Carbon Fiber Clutch Discs  NEW $700.00 
00647-40101-202 Truck & 4Runner Shim(t=0.1mm) for LSD 00647-41301-200 		
		4.00

Engine Performance / Appearance:
00602-12108-001  Toyota Tundra  2000  Oil Cap  TRD Oil Filler Cap, Aluminum, 
Screw-On, TRD Japan style  $46.99  
    Show your dedication to Toyota performance with a TRD billet-style aluminum 
oil cap. 
00602-12108-002  Toyota Tundra  2000  Oil Cap  TRD Oil Filler Cap, Aluminum, 
Screw-On, TRD Japan style  $46.99  
    Show your dedication to Toyota performance with a TRD billet-style aluminum 
oil cap. 
00642-17801-002  Toyota Tundra  2000  Air Filter  High Flow Air Filter  $77.99  
    TRD Air Filters are exact drop-in replacements for stock air filter 
elements. TRD filters provide lower resistance to airflow than stock filters 
resulting in increased engine performance.
00642-90915-001  Toyota Tundra  2000  Oil Filter  High-Performance Oil Filter  
$20.99  
    Super-filter helps protect engine by trapping more grit and grime.
00602-17620-201  Tundra SVZFE V6  2000  TRD Supercharger  $3,136.99  

Body Performance / Appearance:
00602-52000-200  Toyota Tundra  2000  Individual Components  Fender Flares, 
Unpainted Matte Finish  $427.99  
    Muscular fender flares add an aggressive look while providing greater 
coverage for wider tires. Made of tough OEM-grade plastic, flares are offered 
in unpainted black matte finish. 
00602-52000-201  Toyota Tundra  2000  Individual Components  Fender Flares, 
Painted to Match Factory Colors  $627.99  
    Muscular fender flares add an aggressive look while providing greater 
coverage for wider tires. Made of tough OEM-grade plastic, flares are available 
in black, red and white. Other factory colors available on special order. Allow 
10 weeks for delivery.)
00602-52505-000  Toyota Tundra  2000  Body Kit  Ivan Stewart Signature Edition 
Body Kit NEW  $1,999.95 
    Monochromatic body package includes stylish front bumper treatment with 
laser-cut grille surround and charcoal mesh insert. Fender flares, mirror 
covers and signature edition graphics/emblems also included.
00602-42601-EMB  Toyota  ALL    Individual Components  TRD External Badge Set 
(3 included)  $24.99  

Brakes:
None at this time

Chasis/Suspension:
00602-48500-100  Toyota  Tundra 2000  Shocks  Shock Set (4)  $389.95  
    Improve on-road handling and off-road ride with TRD's fade-resistant 
nitrogen-charged shocks.
00602-48500-101  Toyota  Tundra 2000  Shocks  Shock Set (4)  $389.95  
    Improve on-road handling and off-road ride with TRD's fade-resistant 
nitrogen-charged shocks.

Exhaust Systems:
00602-17400-017  Toyota Tundra  2000  Cat-Back  Single Cat-Back Exhaust System, 
Stainless Steel  $631.99  
    Rust-resistant stainless steel muffler provides an increase of 3-4 
rear-wheel hp and a deep, throaty tone. Using your truck's attachment points, 
muffler bolts on without cutting or bending.
00602-17400-018  Toyota Tundra  2000  Cat-Back  Dual Cat-Back Exhaust System, 
Stainless Steel  $759.99  
    Rust-resistant stainless steel muffler provides an increase of 3-4 
rear-wheel hp and a deep, throaty tone. Using your truck's attachment points, 
muffler bolts on without cutting or bending.
00602-17141-009  Toyota Tundra  2000  Headers  Headers, Stainless Steel  
$849.95  
    By providing a smoother path for exhaust gases, TRD's V6 headers increase 
power to a gain of 14-16 hp. Made of rust-resistant stainless steel, TRD 
headers feature a cast, one-piece flange for a perfect fit. Smog legal when 
equipped with O2 sensor.

Interior Appearance:
00602-35000-001  Toyota Tundra  2000  Miscellaneous  4-Piece Floor Mat Set  
$74.99  
00602-35000-100  Toyota Tundra  2000  Miscellaneous  2-Piece Floor Mat Set  
$45.99  

Performance Packages:
00602-40000-400  Toyota Tundra  2000    Pkg, Ivan Stewart Tundra, Access Cab, 
2000, with wheel/tire set NEW  Call
    Includes monochromatic body package, high-performance shocks, off-road 
wheel/tire set and exclusive signature edition graphics. TRD floormats and 
special Ivan Stewart signature interior badge also included.
00602-40000-401  Toyota Tundra  2000    Pkg, Ivan Stewart Tundra, Access Cab, 
2000, w/o wheel/tire set NEW  Call    
    Includes monochromatic body package, high-performance shocks and exclusive 
signature edition graphics. TRD floormats and special Ivan Stewart signature 
interior badge also included.
00602-40000-410  Toyota Tundra  2000    Pkg, Ivan Stewart Tundra, Regular Cab, 
2000, with wheel/tire set NEW  Call    
    Includes monochromatic body package, high-performance shocks, off-road 
wheel/tire set and exclusive signature edition graphics. TRD floormats and 
special Ivan Stewart signature interior badge also included.
00602-40000-411  Toyota Tundra  2000    Pkg, Ivan Stewart Tundra, Regular Cab, 
2000, w/o wheel/tire set NEW  Call    
    Includes monochromatic body package, high-performance shocks and exclusive 
signature edition graphics. TRD floormats and special Ivan Stewart signature 
interior badge also included.

Wheel/Tire:
00602-42600-401  Toyota Tundra  2000    Wheel/Tire/Lugs/Locks Set -- Mounted & 
Balanced  $1,799.95  

Subject: 1.8 - What is this Tundra Double Cab that I am hearing about ?

The Tundra Double Cab is similar in concept to the Tacoma Double Cab that was 
introduced in the 2001 Model Year.  Slated for possible release in 2003 (for 
the 2004 model year), the Tundra Double Cab is still in the conceptual stage.  
Various sources within the Toyota Internet Community (thanks to Dianne Whitmire 
from Carson Toyota for the information !) have confirmed that this version of 
Tundra will exist soon.

The FAQ will release details about the Tundra Double Cab as they become 
available.

------
Subject: 2.0 - Buying a Tundra

Buying any vehicle is a personal process that this FAQ will not get into very 
much.  Some buyers may have their own personal Toyota dealership that they have 
a relationship with, others may choose to do so online.

Also, some packages may not be available in some regions.  Be aware that what 
you find and price on the internet may not actually be available in your area.

Subject: 2.1 - Online Purchases

You can purchase a Tundra over the Internet in most states.  Please be aware 
that if you live in Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Mississippi, Montana, 
Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Virgina, and Wisconsin, you cannot purchase any 
vehicle over the Internet.  In Maryland, Virginia, Iowa, and Mississippi, you 
can lease a vehicle over the Internet.  Again, your mileage may vary in this 
case.

Subject: 2.2 - Comparisons

There has been numerous discussions as to whether or not the Tundra is a "full 
size truck".  Many automobile magazines can't decide on this either, since Car 
and Driver compares the Tundra with the Dodge Dakota, while Motor Trend, 
Automobile Magazine, and Road and Track lumps the Tundra with the Chevy/GMC 
1500, Dodge Ram 1500, and Ford F150.  

GMC's 2000/2001 product literature directly compares the Tundra against the GMC 
1500 Extended Cab, and both GMC and Ford are specificially targeting the Tundra 
in their ads, so obviously the some of the competition considers it a full size 
truck !

In a realistic, dimensioned based sense, the Tundra is roughly 95% of the size 
of the Chevy/GMC, Dodge Ram 1500, and Ford F150, and is about 4-5% larger than 
the T-100.  It's towing and other capabilities are the same as the mentioned 
trucks in the same class, so in the minds of most people, the Tundra is really 
a full size truck.  In most states, the Tundra is registered in the same class 
as the aforementioned trucks.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Insurance Institute for 
Highway Safety also consider the Tundra a full sized truck.

This discussion has caused flame wars in quite a few online forums, including 
www.f150online.com, Edmunds Town Hall, and www.ls1.com.  

Subject: 2.3 - What does the 2000 Motor Trend Truck of the Year award really 
mean ?

To tell the truth: Absolutely Nothing.  Motor Trend has a tendency to give the 
Truck of The Year award to the manufacturer who does something really 
innovative with their model line.  This includes styling changes (read, 
exterior sheet metal), major engine changes, best value, or major driveline 
changes.  

Each of the major manufacturers have won the same award recently.  Dodge won 
when they did their "Peterbilt" style design, Ford won when they introduced the 
new style F150, and so did Chevy/GMC when they redid the C/K 1500 series in 
1999 and the 2500HD in 2001.

Subject: 2.4 - What's the difference between Base, SR5, and Limited ?

Base - Base is exactly that. It's the no-frills version of the Tundra, ususally 
equipped with a V6, manual transmission, and has some decent options like Air 
Conditioning.

SR5 - This is the most flexible version.  You can go as low or as high in terms 
of the options as you want.  Most SR5's are found either as 4x4 single cab 
longbeds, 4x2 Access Cab Shortbeds, or 4x4 Access Cab Shortbeds.  Most have V8 
engines.

Limited - This is the top of the line.  Most are Access Cabs with either 4x4 or 
4x2 suspensions, V8 engines, and leather bucket seats.

Subject: 2.5 - What does SR5 mean anyways ?  (Toyota Historical Background)

In the latter part of the 1970's, the SR5 connotation denoted an option code 
for the HiLux series of trucks, similar to what the Z71 option code currently 
means for an upgraded Chevy or GMC pickup or Tahoe/Yukon.  Originally released 
around 1975, the 'S' denoted Sport, 'R' denoted the RN motor code, and '5' 
denoted the 5-speed transmission.  It quickly caught on and the SR5 connotation 
passed onto the Corolla and then onto other Toyota car models.  Even though the 
HiLux name was dropped in 1979 for the United States market, it is still used 
today elsewhere in the world as the name for a Tacoma-like pickup and/or the 
4Runner, depending on the market.  

Note: Some other historical information shows that the Corolla had the "SR5" 
designation first, then it was passed on to the HiLux series.  The majority of 
historical information seems to promote the HiLux first, then the Corolla, 
rather than vice-versa.

Today, the SR5 generally denotes a specifc Toyota trim level, with a more 
sporty look and wide flexibility for options.

(Thanks to Dianne Whitmire at Carson Toyota as well as ToyotaOffRoad.com for 
the historial information.)

-----

Subject: 3.0 - Modifications to the Tundra and general questions answered

The Toyota Tundra is not exactly a vehicle that has an abundance of 
modifications right now, mainly due to the fact that there are only 200,000 or 
so Tundras in use now.  Listed below are some of the more common modifications 
that are available for the Tundra.  Some modifications are owner installed, 
others need the services of a shop.

Also listed are answers to some common questions posed by some owners on forums 
like USENET, Yahoo!, and TundraSolutions.

Subject: 3.1 - Changing the headlight/fog lamp bulbs (All)

This modification is quite easy to do.  The Tundra is equipped with headlights 
that use a standard 55 Watt H4 Halogen Bulb.  To some, the stock bulbs need to 
be replaced.  

You can replace the stock H4 bulb with another manfacturer's H4 bulb.  
Sylvania, PIAA, and others all produce a replacement bulb.

Please be aware that you should not exceed the specified wattage of the stock 
bulb.  Some Tundra owners have been able to replace the stock bulb with an 80 
watt bulb with no ill effects.  However, it is not recommended to do so without 
being aware that you may need to upgrade the wiring harness and or headlight 
assembly.

Replacement headlight assemblies are $170 each from the dealer.  If you melt 
one, it may be an expensive replacement.

The stock fog lamps are a standard 9006 halogen bulb that uses a bayonet type 
twist mount.  You can use any 51 watt bulb that is 9006 compatible.

Subject: 3.2 - HID Style Headlamps (All)

Some owners wish to replace their lights with a HID (High Intensity Discharge) 
Xenon kit.  True HID kits will require you to rewire your headlamps but can use 
the existing reflector assembly.  

Two companies produce HID kits for the H4 series bulbs.  One word of warning : 
You may lose your high beams.  (Lexus, Mercedes, and other manufacturers that 
use HID bulbs mix a standard halogen bulb for high beams in their reflector 
assemblies.)

American Products Company sells a true HID system that uses the stock assembly 
with a H4 type mounting.  The website is at http://www.4apc.net/HID.htm. 
American Products Company does not sell direct to the public.  The H4 kit from 
APC can be purchased for $799 from Street Beat in Phoenix.  Their phone number 
is 602-254-4332.

A website called HIDLights.com also is selling (and they are on a clearance 
sale) their H4 kit for $825.  You can reach them at www.hidlights.com.

A Canadian company has begun to sell true HID High/Low beam conversion kits.  
The cost for the H4 system is $1329.  The website is at 
http://www.hitechimportlighting.com/bellofhid.htm . 

Subject: 3.3 - Fixing the back seat angle (All)

One of the biggest complaints with the Tundra is the lack of angle on the rear 
seat in Access Cab configurations.  Listed below is a solution found on a 
Toyota Tundra Owner's web site at www.tundrasolutions.com.   The posting is 
taken from the forum verbatim.  Be aware that parts and UPC codes can and will 
change.

"Well, this has been posted before, but I'll list my complete part list, 
instructions, and the URL from this message board that first discussed this. 

Here's the exact part list that compiled: 

Go to Pep Boys and get this:
- End Link Bushings, part # 0-52582-00609. $8.99. The Phoenix area Pep Boys 
quit carrying bolt hardware, so I had to go to Home Depot for the rest.... 

Go to Home Depot and get this: 
- Quantity (4), Hex Bolt, Metric. Pitch 1.25 8mm-1.25x40mm B Zinc. UPC # 
30699-40748 
- Quantity (4), Flat Washer, 8mmx1.25, UPC # 30699-36338 
- Quantity (4), Lock Washer, 8mmx1.25. This one did not have a UPC code. If you 
can't get them, 5/16th Lock Washers will also work. 

The pitch is VERY important. If you cannot match them at Home Depot, get the 
bolts somewhere else ! 

Lift both seats bottoms on the back seat of your Tundra. Look at the gap 
between the carpeted area of your floor and the bottom of the seat back 
cushion. You will see four black bolt heads in a #12 Metric size spaced roughly 
on the left third and right third of the seat bottom. 

Get a Metric Socket Set. Make sure you have at least a 5" extender (or use two 
extenders). Take a #12 metric socket, and remove either the two bolts on the 
driver's side or the passenger side (and only two !!). 

Get the longer bolt. Holding the head of the longer bolt in your left hand, 
place a lock washer, then a flat washer down the shaft of the bolt. Take a 
bushing, pull your seat back forward from the bottom, place the bushing into 
the space between the back wall of the truck sheet metal and the seat back 
frame. Make sure that the conical side of the bushing faces forward. Line up 
the hole of the bushing with the bolt holes, and then insert the bolt. 

Turn the bolt down with your fingers for at least 3 turns. Repeat this 
procedure with the other open mount. Go to the opposite side and follow the 
steps above. I noticed that if I only did two, it was easier to mount. 

After installing all 4, tighten all 4 bolts using a metric # 13 socket. You are 
now done ! Lower your seat bottoms, and sit in the back. You'll notice a 
difference in how the seat back fits against your lower back."

Editor's Note : Some people have reported using slightly longer bushings (1.5") 
to get a better seat angle.  Other people have reported that you can get four 
shock absorber bushings for $2.99 at any Pep Boys, and have substituted these 
for the sway bar bushings.  Your mileage may vary on this modification.  

Subject: 3.4 - Bed Extender (All)

Many of you have seen the "bed extender" that has been available for the Ford 
F150 SuperCrew, Nissan Frontier 4-Door, and other shorter-than-short bed 
trucks.  

There is one available for the Tundra (and other full sized trucks) as well.  
Dealers can carry this add-on and can charge up to $250 for this extender.  AMP 
Research is the manufacturer, but does not sell direct to the public.  (Their 
address is www.amp-research.com.) You can purchase this extender from the 
distributors for around $185.  The URL for the one of the distributors 
(AutoStyles) is: http://autostyles.com/truckbedextender.htm.  If you cannot 
find a distributor, contact your Toyota dealership or Steel Horse Automotive at 
www.steelhorseautomotive.com.

The extender is mounted to a bracket, which in turn is mounted to the rear tie 
downs bolts.  The tie down bolts are replaced with longer ones to facilitate 
the installation of the bracket.  The bracket kit has a part number of 
PT329-34101, and will say "Tundra Bracket Kit" on the box.

Be aware that you do need to purchase the smaller truck version of the bed 
extender.  This is due to the fact that the height of the Tundra's truck bed is 
not as deep as the ones from Chevy/GMC, Dodge, and Ford.  The smaller truck 
version is adjustable to the width of the Tundra's bed width.

Please lock your tailgate to prevent the theft of your bed extender.  Your 
extender can be removed, and the locking of the tailgate prevents the bed 
extender from being placed in a "12 O'Clock" position, which allows it to be 
removed from the brackets.

Subject: 3.5 - Spray In Bed Liners vs. Drop In Bed Liners (All)

This is one of those subjects which vary from owner to owner.  This FAQ will 
list the pros and cons of both versions, and Tundra owners can decide from 
there.

Spray In Liners - Pros
- Provides a non-slip surface
- Does not promote rusting or paint wear in all contact points
- Helps retain resale value
- Can be repaired by reapplication

Spray In Liners - Cons
- Can eventually peel off - leaving bare metal behind
- Can be punctured by tools or other sharp instruments
- Must be installed by a dealer or shop
- Dealer or shop will abrade the clearcoat and paint of the bed to make the 
liner material adhere properly

Drop In Liners - Pros
- More durable than spray in liners
- Is harder to puncture through to the bed
- Can be installed by the owner

Drop In Liners - Cons
- Surface is slippery
- Can wear down paint in certain areas
- Rust and dirt accumulates under drop in liner

Subject: 3.6 - K&N Filters, TRD Filters (and other aftermarket filters) (All)

K&N is a well known manufacturer of aftermarket filters that is used by quite a 
few racing teams as well as many performance enthusiasts.  K&N states that if 
you use their filter, you will see an improvement in engine performance.  The 
filters have a million mile warranty and can be cleaned by the owner.  Regular 
maintenance is recommended at every 50,000 miles.  The filter part number for 
the Tundra is 33-2144.  K&N's website can be found at www.knfilters.com 

Installation of the standard K&N Filter is easy.  Pop all 4 retaining clips off 
of the airbox.  Remove the stock Denso air filter.  Replace it with the K&N 
Filter, making sure that the seals are properly fitted to the rim of the 
airbox, and that the deeper part of the filter is pointed down.  Reattach all 4 
retaining clips.

Some people recommend "resetting" the vehicle's computer, and in some severe 
cases, the "Check Engine" light may come on.  If this light does come on, 
perform the following procedure:

1) Disconnect the negative lead to the battery
2) Leave your truck alone for a half hour or longer
3) Reconnect the negative lead to the battery
4) Start the engine
5) Either drive for 10-15 minutes, or leave your vehicle in drive with the 
parking brake on for the same length of time.

There is a series of well known threads on USENET that state that K&N filters 
can damage your Mass Airflow Sensor (MAF).  This has occurred to some USENET 
posters, however, this damage has not happened to any of the author's personal 
vehicles or any of the author's relatives' vehicles as of yet (yes, my 
immediate and some of my extended family all use K&N Filters in most of our 
cars and trucks !).  This damage to the MAF sensor could theoretically occur if 
the filter was over oiled and oil droplets were to contaminate the MAF sensor.

There are other aftermarket filters available.  Some of them do require the 
modification of the air intake.  One of the more popular filter/air intake 
modifications can be purchased from Rod Millen Motorsports.  Rod Millen is a 
race truck driver who races for Toyota in both a Toyota Tundra and Tacoma in 
C.O.R.R. and Pikes Peak racing.  His shop offers many aftermarket products and 
can be found at www.rodmillen.com.

Toyota Racing Development produces both a washable and non-washable filter for 
the Tundra.

Subject: 3.7 - Towing hitches (All)

Towing hitches are available as both a dealer installed option, or as a 
aftermarket option from vendors such as U-Haul and DrawTite.  

There have been reported differences between Dealer Installed hitches, in which 
it is unknown if the hitch is a Class III or Class IV hitch.  In either case, 
you cannot tow more than 5000 pounds without a load distributing harness with a 
Tundra.  

Some owners have stated that they are not able to purchase a Class IV hitch in 
some areas with a Tundra Limited due to the Limited weighing more than the SR5. 
 The ironic thing is that most SR5 Tundras with the 4x4 and TRD packages will 
end up weighing the same as an identical Limited due to the same options 
installed, including the larger tire package.  This doesn't make sense, but in 
some areas, you can't get a Class IV if you buy a Limited because of the 
supposed increase in curb weight.

For Model Year 2000 Tundras: 

There have been reported problems with some varieties of trailer wiring 
harnesses.  In some earlier manufactured Model Year 2000 Tundras, there has 
been reported blowouts of the fuse and wiring relays.  This also can in many 
cases blow out the third brake light or blow out the third brake light wired in 
camper shells.  

In some other cases, there have been reported recalls of wiring harnesses for 
the towing packages in the southeastern United States, specifically Texas, 
Oklahoma, Louisana, Arkansas, and Mississippi.  The defective wire harness was 
produced by a company called "Tekonsha Engineering Company", in which they were 
a wiring harness distributor to Gulf States Toyota.  If you live in the listed 
areas, and you have a wire harness that was dealer installed, you may want to 
check with your dealer to make sure that your wire harness was not part of a 
regional recall.

It is recommended that if you do decide to add to the existing lighting 
package, you should get either a Toyota trailer wiring converter (said to be 
$80 from dealers) or an aftermarket kit.  This kit will plug into the existing 
wire harness, and will be normally installed behind one of the brake lights.  A 
fuse block is also added to the front in the engine compartment.

Both DrawTite and www.bageco.com offer Tundra specific wire harness kits.  The 
Drawtite part number is 18367 for Model Year 2000 Tundras.  For Model Year 2001 
Tundras, the Drawtite part number is 18378.

For Model Year 2001 Tundras:

The Trailer Wiring harnesses are different from the harnesses available to the 
Model Year 2000 Tundras.  For Model Year 2001 Tundras, part numbers for the 
fuse box is 08922-OC810, and 08921-0C810 for the Hitch Converter Kit

For all Model Year Tundras:

Some owners have reported problems with installing Electronic Brake Controllers 
into Tundras as well.  This is partially due to a lack of insight from Toyota 
Engineering, in which they somehow have forgotten to provide connectors to 
facilitate the installation of one inside the cab of the Tundra.  Many owners 
who have done their own installations have tapped into existing wiring sets to 
provide proper power and signalling capabilities for the brake controller.

Subject: 3.8 - Jack Problems (2000)

There has been a minor problem with the parts of the jack not being able to be 
assembled properly.  Some versions of the jack require some minor filing of the 
parts to remove burrs that prevent the jack from being assembled.

Subject: 3.9 - Oil Dipstick: Burrs (2000)

There has been some reports of the oil dipstick having a minor burr that 
prevents it from seating properly in the dipstick tube.  This burr can be filed 
off.

Subject: 3.10 - Bug Deflectors/Paint Protection (All)

There are three aftermarket solutions for bug and paint protection.  One 
involves the standard bug deflector that mounts to the hood using double sided 
tape or bolts.  These can be purchased from most common truck accessory shops.

The second solution uses a unique plastic polymer called ScotchCal  This 
plastic is a film that can be cut to match outlines of vehicle components.  
This can be purchased from X-Pel.  X-Pel can be found at www.xpel.com.

Some Toyota Dealerships will sell the headlight ScotchCal covers in their parts 
department.  

The third solution uses a clone of the ScotchCal product.  Made by 
Avery/Dennison (the label gun makers), their product is called TrimBrite Body 
Guard.  It comes in rolls that are 6" wide by 12" long in either clear or black 
textured.  You can find TrimBrite at www.trimbrite.com .

Subject: 3.11 - Seat Covers (All)

There are now more manufacturers that produces seat covers that directly 
matches the contours of the Tundra seats (both 60/40 split bench and bucket 
fronts, as well as contoured covers for the rear) than previously reported in 
other editions of the FAQ.  One version is similar to the Neoprene covered 
seats found in the Nissan Xterra.  These covers can be purchased from a company 
called Wet Okole, who has offices in both Hawaii and Orange County, CA.  Wet 
Okole produces neoprene based seat covers that are somewhat water repellent and 
can be matched to many color schemes.  Front and rear seats are $250 each. Wet 
Okole can be found at www.wetokole.com.  The only known "flaw" with the Wet 
Okole's are that they prevent the use of the rear seat cupholder.

Automobile Magazine has reported in their November 2000 edition that they have 
installed custom Cordura Plus seat covers that installed into their long term 
test Tundra SR5 Access Cab.  They purchased the set from Overlander Outfitters. 
 Their phone number is 877-SUV-GEAR.  Their website can be found at 
www.overlander.com.  Front and rear seats are $199 each for Cordura Plus covers 
with padding.

Some Toyota dealers are also offering seat covers from local seat cover 
manufacturers.  Please contact your local Toyota Dealer parts department for 
more information.

Subject: 3.12 - Suspension/Body Lift Kits (All)

There are two main ways of suspension lifting the Tundra.  One utilizes a 
spacer from a company called Cornbred.  They produce 1.5 and 2 inch spacers.  
These fit between the suspension arm and the shock/coil combination.  Cornbred 
spacers can be purchased from this web page:  
http://members.aol.com/cornbredsspacers/CornbredsSpacers.html.  Daystar has 
released a Cornbred spacer clone which is in production right now in the 
Phoenix area.

The other method utilizes a replacement of the major suspension components.  
Fabtech and other manufacturers provide various lift kits for the Tundra, 
however, not too many people have lifted their trucks yet due to the fact that 
they are waiting for someone else to do it first (lab experiment ?).  Some 
people have reported problems with early generations of the Fabtech lift kit, 
which had parts rubbing against each other to the point where pieces fell off.  
 Fabtech has fixed some problems and replaced their design with more composite 
based parts, but are still reported to have some problems.

Fabtech can be found at www.fabtechmotorsports.com

Downey Suspension has issued a new coil over kit that includes Bilstein shocks. 
 Since they have no website, you can contact them directly at (562)949-9494

4wheelparts.com offers a body lift kit.  The URL for the lift kit can be found 
at http://www.4wheelparts.com/product2.asp?imseqn=304&occlass=P%2FA&cat=BOD. 

There is a general worry that suspension lifting the Tundra may not be problem 
free.  This is in part to the design of the Tundra's drivetrain components, 
which do not have the latitude that the Tacoma has in lifting the suspension 
and body.

Subject: 3.13 - Lowering Kits (All)

Many owners have used lowering brackets to drop their Tundra at least 2 inches. 
 Also, TRD displayed a lowering kit at the SEMA show in 2000.  It dropped the 
Tundra 4" in the front and 6" in the rear.  More details are to come out for 
this modification.  

Be aware that there is a load sensing valve for the rear brakes.  If there is 
any dropping of the Tundra, this valve needs to be readjusted.  If you have a 
Tundra repair manual, please refer to Volume 2, Section BR-39.

Subject: 3.14 - Superchargers (All)

Toyota Racing Development has been infamous in providing add on supercharger 
kits that bolt on to the existing engines with little to no modifications.  At 
the current time, a Toyota Racing Development supercharger is only available 
for the V6 Tundra engine.  A V8 supercharger may be available soon, due to the 
fact that the V8 engine is similar to the ones used in both the Lexus 
LX/GS400/430, Lexus LX470, and the Toyota Land Cruiser.  The TRD V-8 
Supercharger at the current time is undergoing C.A.R.B. (California Air 
Resources Board) certification with an unknown estimated shipping timeframe.

According to some early posts, the early prototype versions of the TRD V8 
supercharger has had some design problems. People who have talked to TRD 
engineers or testers have mentioned two glaring problems with the proposed TRD 
V-8 Supercharger:

1) The differential is unable to handle the additional torque (too much 
slippage ?)
2) A Limiter may be added to only allow the supercharger to kick in after 2nd 
gear

It has been theorized that the stock differential should be able to handle the 
supercharger.  External tests from various 4x4 magazines show that the Tundra's 
differential and axle has a strength between a Dana 35 and a Dana 44. 

The versions "seen" by Internet posters said that the test supercharger has 
provided up to 400 Horsepower for the stock engine.   Again, this is from what 
is posted on the Internet - Your Mileage May Vary once the real kit comes out.

At the 2000 SEMA show, TRD demonstrated a addon supercharger with a new limited 
slip differential.  To view the specifications, go to 
http://www.pickuptruck.com/html/autoshows/sema2000/toyota/customized/tundrasc.h
tml .

Rod Millen Motorsports has a supercharger kit available for sale now.  Details 
are sketchy, but it seems to be a bolt on kit that utilizes the current engine 
covers.  Pictures can be found at www.rodmillen.com.

The other option to boost your Tundra is to spend $100,000 for a TRD racing 
engine.  This would include a complete engine that would install into your 
Tundra.  The bad part (other than eating up $100,000), is that you will have to 
use racing fuel and not ever pass emissions again.

Subject: 3.15 - White or Indiglo(tm) style Gauges (All)

Some owners have considered modifying their Tundra stock gauges with one that 
is either White faced or contains an Indiglo(tm) blue electroluminescent color 
at night.

NR Automotive has been the only source willing to provide Tundra Gauge 
upgrades.  You can contact them at www.nrauto.com . 

For those of you that are curious as to how the Indiglo(tm) electroluminescent 
process works, here is the explanation from Marshall Brain's (yes, that is his 
real name) web site, www.howstuffworks.com.  The exact URL is 
http://www.howstuffworks.com/question296.htm .

"In an Indiglo watch a very thin panel uses high voltage to energize phosphor 
atoms that produce light. The panel itself is extremely simple. As described in 
the Timex patent (see the first link below), you take a thin glass or plastic 
layer, coat it with a clear conductor, coat that with a very thin layer of 
phosphor, coat the phosphor with a thin plastic and then add another electrode. 
Essentially what you have is two conductors (a capacitor) with phosphor in 
between. When you apply 100 to 200 volts AC to the conductors, the phosphor 
energizes and begins emitting photons. 

"Creating the high voltage can be a problem in a wristwatch. The watch has only 
a small 1.5 volt battery. To produce the 100-200 volts, the 1:100 transformer 
is used. By charging the primary coil of the transformer with a transistor that 
is switching on and off, the secondary rises to 150 volts or so."


Subject: 3.16 - Horn Upgrades (2000)

Many 2000 Tundra owners have complained about the lack of "authority" in the 
Tundra horns.  The easiest solutions involve the installation of Fiamm horns 
that can be purchased either as a kit (two horns), or individually so that you 
can choose note/pitch.  These horns can be purchased at any local Pep Boys, 
AutoZone, Checker's, Schucks, or Kragen.  Average costs are around $20.

The Tundra horn wire harness terminates in a standard blade type connector.  
The existing bolts from the OEM horns can be used to mount the new horns.  

More complex solutions involve the addition of air horns, relays, and 
multi-stage delay horn activations.  There is a complete discussion on the 
Tundra Solutions web page.  Tundra Solutions can be found at 
www.tundrasolutions.com.

2001 Tundras have a more "solid" sounding horn.  Owners may or may not want to 
modify their horns.  

Subject: 3.17 - Compass Mirrors (All)

Some dealers will install an optional Compass Mirror, which shows direction and 
heading of your vehicle as you drive.  Currently, there are two manufacturers 
of this type of mirror.  One version of this mirror can be purchased directly 
from Donnelly Electronics Corporation for around $215.  Donnelly's link for the 
Tundra specific mirror can be reached at 
http://www.donnellye.com/_private/prod01.htm.  Gentex also produces versions of 
these mirrors and are OEM mirrors for some other car manufacturers (such as 
GM).  Gentex's web site is at www.gentex.com.  You can purchase a Gentex mirror 
from Mito Corporation at www.mitocorp.com.

Subject: 3.18 - RS3000 Alarm Systems - Adding a Remote (All)

Many people have purchased this alarm system with their vehicle, and sometimes 
they want to add a remote.  From the FAQ of the Toyota RAV4 is instructions on 
how to program the RS3000 to accept another remote (Thanks to the RAV4 FAQ and 
Ralph Becker for this information !)

From Thomas A. Yurick <designer@penn.com> by way of 
Mark Miller <mark@bccd.com>:
 
First, some background info. You will need to find the ECU for the 
alarm/keyless RS3000 system. Mine is under the drivers seat.  (Authors note:  
In the Tundra, the Alarm ECU is generally located on the drivers' side sidewall 
area under and behind the dash.)  Looking at the side with the connectors on 
it, there is a small button or hole on the right-hand side. you will need to 
press the button or insert a paper clip into the hole to press the switch 
inside, following the instructions below. The Status Monitor is the the Red LED 
light on the dash that says "security" under it. This procedure seems quite 
simple, although the manual still advises one to contact a dealer to do it. It 
sure isn't worth $76! Be sure that you follow the procedure exactly or there is 
a chance that you might mess up the programming of the original remote. If that 
happens, just follow the procedure again to add the remote back to the system.
 
1. Insert key into the ignition switch and turn to "ON". 
 
2. Press and hold the ECU's programming switch for 3 seconds.  
The Status Monitor LED turns on for 5 seconds.
 
YOU MUST PERFORM THE NEXT STEP WITHIN 5 SECONDS!
 
3. Press and release the remote control's top or bottom button (whichever one 
you want to operate the system).
The Status Monitor LED turns off.
The Piezo "chirper" chirps once.
The exterior lights flash once.
 
4. Turn off the ignition. The ECU will now operate with the remote just 
programmed.

Subject: 3.19 - Removing Stickers, Emblems and Badges (All)

Some owners prefer the "clean look" for their Tundras.  Many remove the 
Emblems, badges, and stickers from their vehicles.  The easiest way is to 
utilize a hair dryer to heat the item and area enough to remove them.  Others 
have used a combination of heat, dental floss (preferably Glide (tm) brand 
floss), and De-Solv-It.  Your mileage may vary.

WARNING:  Some owners have reported that the paint underneath the emblems and 
stickers "chip off" when they are removed.  This may be due to the application 
of emblems and stickers before the paint is totally cured at the factory.  If 
this occurs, your only option may be to have the entire truck repainted, 
depending on the level of damage.

Subject: 3.20 - Brush/Light Guards and Step Bars (All)

Most major manufacturers of aftermarket Brush/Light Guards and step bars make a 
model for the Tundra.  The manufacturer that has the most complete line would 
be Waag Corporation out of California.  Waag's website is at www.waag.com.

Subject: 3.21 - Help !  I got dimples on my tailgate ! (All)

Dimples are cute on kids, but not on tailgates.  Dimpled tailgates are most 
commonly found when people remove the cables that help attach the tailgate to 
the bed.  The tailgate ends up resting on the bumper, and indentations are 
formed when a heavy object sandwiches the tailgate between the object and the 
bumper.  Most dimples will mimic the exact spot where the bumper curves towards 
the license plate.

To avoid tailgate dimples:  Either totally remove the tailgate, or don't remove 
the tailgate.  Most dent removal companies can remove the dents (at a somewhat 
pricey cost) and the work will not be covered by most insurance policies.

Subject: 3.22 - My Tundra is Drooling ! (Coolant spills) (2000)

In some cases with earlier 2000 Model Year Tundra versions, your Tundra will 
spill coolant out the overflow vent path.  This can occur when you encounter 
very rough or rough and angled driving conditions (read: Off Road !).  There is 
a TSB out on this that fixes the problem by replacing the coolant fill bottle 
assembly.

Subject: 3.23 - I'm stuck with only one Differential ! (All)

People have reported some disappointment with the stock differential in the 
Tundra.  There are two available differential upgrades and one upcoming upgrade 
for the Tundra.  The two available differential upgrades are from PowerTrax and 
from Toyota Racing Development's Kazuma part division.   ARB has mentioned that 
they will release an AirLocker for the Tundra, but it is not available yet.

PowerTrax will be making two versions that will work in the Tundra, one of 
which is available now: An automatic locker addon called the PowerTrax No-Slip, 
(it's predecessor is called the Lock-Right), and there is a proposed future 
unit called the AllLock. The AllLock version is not shipping at this time.  
PowerTrax can be found at www.powertrax.com.  The only version that can be 
installed on the Tundra is the PowerTrax No-Slip.

TRD demonstrated a limited-slip differential at the 2000 SEMA show and is now 
available from TRD.  You can see the SEMA show information at 
http://www.pickuptruck.com/html/autoshows/sema200/toyota/customized/tundrasc.ht
ml .

The cost for this differential from TRD is $700.  It is a true limited-slip 
differential with clutch type discs to provide power to both wheels. See 
section 1.7 for the description of the differential.  The new differential has 
been said to include new pinions as well.  

As of July 2001, it has been reported by Tundra owners that ARB will be 
releasing a variant of the ARB AirLocker for use in the Tundra.  It will have a 
part number of RD89, and the price is unknown at this time.

Here's a short comparison between the PowerTrax No-Slip, the TRD Limited-Slip 
Differential (LSD), and the ARB AirLocker:

PowerTrax Pros:
No clutches to wear out
Can be installed by the owner
Has been proven off-road

PowerTrax Cons:
Bad for snow conditions
Cannot turn it off and on like a true locking differential
Is not covered by any warranty other than PowerTrax's
Forces the driver to learn new driving styles due to the locking differential

TRD LSD Pros:
Can be installed by a dealer
Is covered by TRD's warranty and is also covered by the vehicle warranty if 
installed by a dealer.
Is more of a True Limited-Slip Differential
Does not require the owner to relearn driving techniques

TRD LSD Cons:
Long Installation time - 7 hours of labor is being quoted by Dealers
Doubtful that it can be installed by the owner
No replacement clutches or pads as of yet
Clutches and pads wear out after time and must be replaced.

ARB Pros:
No clutches to wear out
Can be installed by the owner
Has an excellent track record off-road
Can be turned on and off at will
Driver does not have to learn a new driving style, unlike the PowerTrax locker

ARB Cons:
Is not covered by the manufacturer's warranty

Subject: 3.24 - I don't like the small tires on my 4x4 Tundra.  What can I do? 
(All)

People on the internet have switched out tires quite a bit.  According to the 
site www.bigtoytrucks.com, the largest tires fitted without major modification 
of the Tundra's suspension or frame was a 285/60-18 Bridgestone Dueler with 18" 
Antera Rims.  Some other owners have used 285/75-16 BF Goodrich All Terrain 
TA/KO's on the stock 16" rims with some rubbing against the mud flap extension 
and/or Ivan Stewart package bumper during sharp turns.  Others have 
successfully used 265/75-16's.

Be aware that there will be an slight incorrect reporting of your speed and 
mileage due to the larger tires.  According to posts at Tundrasolutions.com, 
the spedometer and odometer are linked to some sort of transmission based 
sensor and cannot be owner calibrated.

The largest tire that has been placed in the spare tire area so far has been a 
285/75-16 BF Goodrich Mud Terrain tire.

FYI - The FAQ Author's stock suspension Tundra uses BF Goodrich All Terrain 
TA/KO's in 285/75-16.  The front mudflaps have been removed to facilitate 
lock-to-lock turning without any frame rubbing.

For those of you who would like to calculate the difference in tire sizing and 
how it affects your spedometer, there is a free calculator available.  The URL 
is: http://www.venommotorsports.com/howto/wheeldiameters.htm .

Subject: 3.25 - I hate Daytime Running Lamps.  Can I disconnect them ? (All)

Not unless you remove your Anti-Lock braking system.  Just kidding.  Actually, 
someone posted an unofficial fix in which the following was written in 
www.tundrasolutions.com:

"Tundras with DRL's have two gray electrical connectors located between the 
battery and the inner fender liner. One of these connectors is fastened to the 
fender liner and has two black wires leading to another component also fastened 
to the fender. Disconnect this one and your daylight running lights are 
inoperative. If you change your mind simply reconnect and you are back to 
stock."

The Tacoma Territory Off Roaders Association (TTORA.COM) has posted the actual 
TSB (TSB EL011-00) that was issued on October 2000.  This is the official 
method of disabling the Daytime Running Lamps.  Copies can be found on the 
TTORA FAQ site at 
http://www.tacomaterritory.com/~faqsection/content/dsabldrl.htm .

Subject: 3.26 - What is this "clay" stuff?  Does this mean I put a mud mask on 
my truck? (All)

Well, the proper way to put a mud mask on your truck is to run it off road 
during or after a heavy rain storm !  

Actually, a clay bar is used by detailers to remove particles off of your 
paint's finish.  It ends up leaving your paint with a clean, smooth feel, and 
does not affect your clearcoat.  It does strip off all wax, so be sure to 
re-wax your vehicle.  Zaino Brothers and Erazer both have clay materials for 
use with automotive detailing.  Zaino Brothers is at www.zainobros.com, Erazer 
is at www.erazer.com.

Subject: 3.27 - What do I "feed" my Tundra ? (Gas) (All)

The owners' manual states that you can put plain 'ole 87 Octane Unleaded Gas.  
Do that and your Tundra will be very happy.  There is no mention of not putting 
in fuels laced with MTBE or Ethanol, so it seems that seasonal additives 
required in some areas will not damage your engine.  MTBE may be phased out due 
to groundwater contamination in some areas (specifically the Southwestern and 
Western United States), so Ethanol will probably be the only oxygenation 
additive in the future.  

On a side note:  Many owners have asked some questions about Octane levels.  
Octane levels are a method of determining how fast the fuel-air mixture burns 
in the piston cylinders in your engine.  The higher the number, the more 
resistant the gasoline is to igniting due to compression and heat before the 
spark plug ignites the fuel (known as "knocking").  Your Tundra engine is 
calibrated for 87 octane fuel, and unless you are getting severe knocking in 
your engine, don't buy higher octane fuel.

Subject 3.28 - What is this plastic stuff under my truck? (Skid Plates) (All)

Some varieties of Tundras utilize either all metal skid plates, all plastic 
skid plates, or a combination of plastic and metal, with metal being used in 
the heavier theoretical "impact" areas of the Tundra, such as the front engine 
and transfer case areas.  (The FAQ Author's personal Tundra is the 
plastic/metal combination)

In reality, there really is no difference between the all metal variety vs. the 
all plastic variety.  Both versions will do what they are supposed to do: 
Prevent damage to the powertrain components.  Some people prefer the theory 
that "all metal will be better because of load bearing capabilities", where 
others prefer that "all plastic will allow the plate to bounce back rather than 
being hammered back into shape".  

Composite plastics have proven to be as strong as metal in many cases, with the 
advantage of a possible lighter weight.  Newer metals (such as Easton's 
Scandanium) offer the strength of steel with lightness of Titanium and 
Aluminum.  

In any case, this debate will probably go down into the realms of the 
discussions with Chevy vs. Ford vs. Dodge vs. Is the Tundra a full size 
truck...etc.

Subject 3.29 - Oil Gauges (All)

Many owners have noticed that when the truck is at idle, the oil gauge is 
nearly at zero.  According to the Phoenix area Toyota service departments (yes, 
I called every single one of them in Phoenix), the oil pressure is very low at 
idle and the gauge is accurate.  Oil pressure will increase as engine RPM 
increases.

Subject: 3.30 - I'm missing a lock ?  How do I get one ? (Glove Compartment) 
(All)

Well, just like the Electronic Brake Controllers, Toyota Engineers figured we 
didn't need one for the Glove Compartment or any of the stowage compartments 
(center console, rear seat storage, etc.)  There are no plans to add one for 
the 2001 model year either.

Subject: 3.31 - My Doors are out of control and fling open (or slam shut) on a 
hill !  Is there a fix for it ? (All)

Well, this is another one of those things that Toyota Engineers felt that they 
knew better than the consumers did.  The Tundra doors does not have an adequate 
roller notch, or "detent" in which it will "stop" the door one thirds, two 
thirds, and fully open.  There is no fix for this, and there will be no major 
changes for the 2001 model year.  The 2001 model year Tundras seem to have 
quite a bit more friction, but owners of 2001 Tundras have also complained 
about the lack of detent friction while parking on inclines.

Subject: 3.32 - What is the difference between "hub centric" and "bolt or lug 
centric" rims ? (All)

Ninety Nine percent of all vehicles out in the world today utilze a "hub 
centric" rim.  What that means is that when your tire/wheel combination is 
being balanced by a tire shop, they utilize a balance machine that relies on 
the hub of the rim to be a "true centering" aid.  In other words, the center 
hole of the rim is what the tire shop uses to base the tire/wheel combination 
balance on.  The factory alloys on the Tundra SR5 and Limited are reported to 
be Hub Centric rims.

Some Toyota 4Runner, Tacoma, Land Cruiser and Tundra factory rims have been 
reported to be "bolt centric" or "lug centric", which means that the tire/wheel 
combination must be centered on the lugs, and not using the center hub.  An 
excellent example of this is the Ivan Stewart TRD wheel for the Tundra, which 
is a Lug Centric Wheel.

To correct this, tire shops and service centers must use a combination of a 
Hunter tire balance machine and a Haweka adapter.  According to the Internet, 
all 4Runner wheels must be balanced using this combination per TSB SU002-96.  
The Tundra equivalent to the 4Runner TSB is TSB# BR003-00.

Please ask your dealership or your tire service center if they have the listed 
equipment.  It has been reported that many Toyota dealers do not.  If you have 
tire work done at a Toyota dealership, ask to see the actual lug centric 
converter.

For more information on this subject, please check this web page out at 
http://forums.vmag.com/suv4run0499/messages/3295.html

Subject: 3.33 - My Cruise Control is running erratically.  What's causing it ? 
(All)

This has bugged some Tundra owners, and has been reported as a problem by some. 
 The cruise control and the onboard computer sometimes do not agree, making or 
forcing the cruise control subsystem to make wierd decisions like accelerating 
without downshifting, or speeding up about 3-5 MPH above the desired speed, 
then slowing down.  This seems to be normal, but not desired, behavior from the 
cruise control and the vehicle's computer.

Subject: 3.34 - I've seen these mirrors that blink as the turn signal blinks.  
What are they ? (All)

These rear view mirrors that you see that "blink" as the turn signal is 
activated are made by a company called Muth Mirror Systems.  First made popular 
by the Ford Expedition, there are two add ons available from Muth that can be 
adapted to the Tundra.

1) A Wide Angle Signal mirror, which is an add on to your existing mirrors

2) The original Automotive Signal mirror, which replaces the driver's side and 
passenger mirrors on your Tundra.

To locate Muth Mirror Systems, go to http://www.kwmuth.com.

Subject: 3.35 - My Air Conditioning isn't blowing cold.  Why is this happening 
? (All)

This seems to be a common happening due to the automobile manufacturers going 
to R134A refrigerant.  In the FAQ author's hometown of Phoenix, R134A equipped 
vehicles tend to blow air that is not as cold as R12 equipped vehicles.  R134A 
equipped vehicles will also take longer to get colder than R12 equipped 
vehicles.  Some people may argue that it takes forever for any vehicle to get 
cold air during the summer heat of Phoenix, but it takes less time for a '92 
Honda Civic with R12 to get cold air then the Author's 2000 V8 Tundra Access 
Cab.

For those of you who didn't know, R12 was taken off the shelves due to studies 
(?) showing that R12 and other ChloroFluoroCarbons (CFC's) deplete the ozone 
layer.  The other common theory of R12's disapperance is due to Dupont's 
copyright and patents of R12 expiring a few years back, forcing Dupont to lobby 
world governments to ban R12.  R12 is now required to be recycled by automotive 
repair facilities.  

Subject: 3.36 - Can I fix the two power outlets to stay on when the ignition is 
off ? (All)

A solution to this has been posted to Tundra Solutions.  Listed below is a copy 
of the post.

One of the features I didn't like about the Tundra is the two extra power 
outlets to the right of the ash tray/cupholders go dead when the key is off. 
Sometimes it's nice to have your cellphone continue to charge or to leave your 
CB on when stopping for gas, so I decided to "improve upon" the situation.

Power to those two outlets is provided by a relay and two 15A fuses in the 
underhood fuse/relay box. The relay is the large brown one in the 3rd position 
back from the end of the fuse/relay box closest to the engine. Make a 3" jumper 
cable out of 14 awg wire with two male .25" spade terminals on the ends. Unplug 
the relay and you will see the relay socket has two large pins and two small 
ones. Insert the ends of the jumper wire into the two LARGE pins of the relay 
socket. This bypasses the relay and feeds battery power to the outlets at all 
times. 
NOTE: it does NOT affect the lighter plug -- that will still switch off with 
the key. There is no downside to this as near as I can tell. I've been running 
the truck this way for 2 weeks now. YMMV.

To see a website that shows the actual modification, please go to 
http://homepage.mac.com/arbore/tundra/tundra_powerport_mod.html.

To only make one of the outlets stay on, a fix for this is listed below that 
was originally posted on Tundra Solutions.

Good idea on how to put both outlets on "hot" all the time. As an addition to 
that method, there is a way to set up to have one outlet "hot" all the time and 
one come on only with the ignition. I wanted mine that way so I could keep my 
cell phone plugged in and charged all the time and have my radar detector come 
on automatically when starting the car. In the fuse box right next to the 
battery you will find two 15Amp fuses marked on the inside of the cover as 
outlet #1 and outlet #2. Pick either you want and pull that fuse out. Now 
connect a lead with an inline fuse (don't do it without the inline fuse) from 
the stud at the inside end of the box to the rear terminal of the position 
where you removed the fuse. You will need a large size crimp terminal on one 
end (for the stud end) and a blade style crimp terminal to connect into the 
connection where the fuse was located. A bit more complex than the procedure 
that makes both "hot" but easy enough if you have had any experience with auto 
wiring. This will provide fused power to one of the outlets at all times since 
the stud that powers the fuse box is hot all the time and connected directly to 
the battery...

Subject: 3.37 - Exhaust/Header Upgrades (All)

Both Toyota and many aftermarket manufacturers (Borla, Jardine, and Gibson) 
produce what is commonly called "cat back" exhaust systems.  Cat Back exhaust 
systems are exhaust systems that replace every component from the Catalytic 
Converter to the muffler.  

The Toyota Racing Development system replaces the stock system with a dual 
exhaust system.  Borla, Jardine, and Gibson provide bolt on units that utilize 
the same exhaust routing that the stock system uses.

The TRD system can be found at www.trdusa.com.  The Borla, Jardine, and Gibson 
systems can be found on Rod Millen Motorsports' site at www.rodmillen.com.

In regards to header upgrades, the only known bolt on header system is one made 
by JBA.  More details are coming out about this new header system.

Subject: 3.38 - How come my California Tundra is mising horsepower ? (All)

California emission based Tundras have a slightly different horsepower rating 
due to emission controls installed on the engine and exhaust.  This is 
(unfortunately) normal with all California Emission based Tundras.  The 
unfortunate thing is that your non-California Tundra may have a California 
exhaust system on it. 

To see if you have a California emission Tundra, look on the underside to see 
if you have three catalytic converters coming off of your headers.  If you have 
two, your Tundra is of the 245HP variety.  If you have three, you have a 240HP 
Tundra.

Subject: 3.39 - My door locks will unlock and my lights will turn on.  Why is 
this happening ? (2000)

This is a known problem involving either the front and/or rear door latches.  
They need to be readjusted or replaced.  In some cases, the composite plastic 
latches may need to be replaced by a metal/composite latch.

In some other cases, the rear doors have been shut improperly or there may be 
something jammed between the door and the cab.  This has reported to cause 
similar symptoms of the doors unlocking, and the interior lights turning 
on/headlamps shutting off.

Subject: 3.40 - How do I shut off my door beeper ? (All)

Look under the driver's side seat.  There will be a white plastic plug 
connector.  Separate the halves of the connector and the beeper will only sound 
off if your keys are in the ignition and you leave your door open. 

Subject: 3.41 - What are these black "tracks" on the roof of the Tundra ? (All)

They are rain gutters.  You can't mount anything on them.

Subject: 3.42 - I hear this noise when I first start to move my Tundra, what is 
it ? (All)

This is known as an ABS Clunk.  It originates from the right side engine 
compartment of the Tundra.  The ABS system will do a self test during the first 
batch of forward or rearward movement that your Tundra has within the first 1-2 
minutes of operation.  This is normal due to the ABS self test and will occur 
when your Tundra is either in a forward or reverse gear.

Subject: 3.43 - How often do I need to use my 4x4 system ? (All)

You should use your 4x4 system at least 10 miles every month.  This insures 
that all lubricants and fluids are distributed properly and your 4x4 system is 
kept in a working order.

Note: Be sure that you do NOT use your 4x4 system on dry pavement !

Subject: 3.44 - What are these brown spots on my paint ? (All)

These brown spots on your paint are imbedded metallic particles that has gone 
through the clearcoat and has imbedded itself underneath the clearcoat.  
Commonly called "Rail Dust", the particles can be removed by using a clay bar.  
Some severe cases can be cured by using a spray of oxalic acid, but that can 
damage plastic parts.  According to DaimlerChrysler Corporation, clay bar 
treatments are the only recommended solution to remove rail dust on all their 
vehicles, including the Mercedes-Benz Line.  Toyota recommends claying the 
vehicle before waxing them in their Lexus recondtioned used car certification 
program.  

Subject: 3.45 - Boy...what is that smell ? (Air Conditioning odors) (All)

Let's face it, your air conditioning unit not only cools the air, but it also 
removes moisture from the ambient air as well.  Trapped water can promote the 
growth of mold, spores, and other funky fungi inside your air conditioning 
unit.

There are three main ways to remove the smell, one of which also kills the 
mold/spores/fungus.

The first product is called Odor Gun.  It is made by Medo, which is a division 
of Pennzoil-Quaker State.  It can be purchased at most places that sell auto 
supplies and comes in a decent sized bottle.

The second product is called BG Frigi-Fresh.  This not only kills the odor, it 
also kills the mold and mildew that can accumulate.  BG Products also sells a 
similar product called BG Frigi-Clean, which also removes Nicotine oils and 
other debris.  BG Products can be contacted at www.bgprod.com.

Subject: 3.46 - I want some ground shaking bass in my Tundra...how can I do 
this ? (All)

For those Tundra owners who have Bucket seats, the easiest way is to install a 
J.L. Audio Stealthbox.  The J.L. Audio Stealthbox will fit underneath the 
existing center console and raise it up slightly.  The current Stealthbox 
contains a J.L. Audio 10W3 10" Subwoofer with a 4 ohm mono load.  To contact 
J.L. Audio, please go to their website at www.jlaudio.com .  Be aware that most 
applications will raise your center console to allow for clearance of the audio 
components.  

Subject: 3.47 - I'd like to get the repair manuals for my Tundra.  Where can I 
get some ? (All)

The only place to get the repair manuals for your Tundra is directly from 
Toyota.  Neither Haynes nor Chilton has issued a repair guide for the Tundras 
as of yet.  For those of you who want to order one, go to your local Toyota 
dealership's parts counter and order the following part numbers:

Tundra Repair Manual Volume 1 - P/N RM682U1
Tundra Repair Manual Volume 2 - P/N RM682U2
Tundra Electrical Wiring Diagram - P/N EWD367U
Tundra Automatic Transmission Repair Manual - P/N RM688U

Subject: 3.48 - My Brake Pedal is squeaking...how can I fix it ? (All)

This is a common problem.  You can take your truck (if it is still under 
warranty) to have this corrected.  What needs to be lubricated are the brake 
pedal switches and the pivot points.

Subject: 3.49 - What is this empty black button ?  (Clutch Disengage Switch/Fog 
Lamp switch) (All)

If you have a Tundra with an automatic or manual transmission, there will be a 
set of black buttons to the left of the steering wheel column.  These buttons 
are for the placement of either a fog lamp button (leftmost button nearest the 
door) or for a clutch disengagement switch (rightmost button nearest the 
steering wheel column).  If you have a manual transmission with fog lamp 
option, you will have both switches.  If you have an automatic transmission 
with fog lamps, you will only have one button.  If you have an automatic 
transmission with no fog lamps, you will have no buttons.  

Some Tundra owners have figured out a way to put these blank buttons to good 
use.  An Arizona Neurosurgeon that owns a Tundra has figured a way to wire a 
harness into the hole position.  A detailed set of instructions can be found 
at: http://www.fastq.com/~louvu/extrafogswitch.htm .


Subject: 3.50 - What is this tapping sound ? (All)

There has been some discussions on TundraSolutions and Usenet as to what is 
causing this tapping sound that usually comes after starting the engine.  

As of June of 2001, the culprit finally has been found !  In many cases, the 
exhaust manifold has cracked slightly. The gap then allows a tapping noise to 
escape, and in most situations, will disappear when the engine is hot due to 
metal expansion sealing the crack.

Subject: 3.51 - My fabric based tonneau cover keeps flapping around.  Why is 
that ? (All)

Well, I hate to tell you this, but this is normal.

Even though your tonneau cover frame is tight against the bed of the truck, and 
the fabric is tight around the frame, two conditions occur that unfortunately 
causes this flapping phenomenon:  Fabric stretching and the physics of flying. 

Let's face it, all fabric stretches to a certain degree.  If they didn't 
stretch, we'd all be running around bottomless after a really big Thanksgiving 
dinner with two pieces of pie for dessert.  The tonneau cover fabric will 
stretch due to weather conditions, handling, and the physics involved in how 
airplanes fly; all of this play big parts as to why your cover will bow and/or 
flap around.

Let's look at the physics of flight.  The reason why airplanes fly is due to an 
aerodynamic condition called lift.  Lift is caused when there is a differential 
in air pressure in one side of a surface versus the other side of a surface.  
When your truck is moving, the air is moving faster over the tonneau cover 
fabric than the air inside the bed of the truck.  Therefore, your tonneau cover 
will raise up and stretch to the limits of the fabric.  

Your cover will flap around instead of bowing upward when the speed of your 
truck is insufficient to provide enough consistent airflow to maintain lift.

If you don't like things flapping around, consider a Pace-Edwards type roll top 
tonneau cover, or a SnugTop/A.R.E. type solid tonneau.

Subject: 3.52 - Can I get better brakes for the Tundra ? (All)

At this point, no.  There are no aftermarket accessories available to improve 
the brakes on the Tundra.  As of January 11th, Brembo is still working with TRD 
to see if TRD will release a 13" kit for the front brakes.  It is highly 
unlikely that the 15" front brake kit shown at the 2000 SEMA show (nor the 13" 
rear disc conversion) will make it to production.

According to discussions that the FAQ author has had with Brembo, the TRD 
badged kit will be most likely 13" discs combined with a variant of their F4 
calipers.  Target dates are Q2-Q3 of 2001.

Subject: 3.53 - What is a throttle body spacer ? (All)

A Throttle Body Spacer is an add on to your air/fuel intake area.  Originally 
used in the days of vehicles with carburetors, a throttle body spacer would 
allow additional fuel/air mix to be present to allow for additional power, or 
was used to "disturb" the air in such a way so that the fuel would form smaller 
droplets.  In current fuel injected vehicles, the spacer would allow for a 
greater amount of air contained within the throttle body assembly so that the 
engine would not have to work as hard in getting the air into the engine.

Poweraid currently makes a throttle body spacer for the Tundra.  You can 
contact them at www.poweraid.com .  There is a clone of the PowerAid throttle 
body spacer called the Helix Power Tower made by a company called "Street and 
Performance Electronics".  Street and Performance Electronics does not have a 
web site, but you can do a search for the phrase "Helix Power Tower" in any 
internet search engine.

Subject: 3.54 - Can I tow a fifth wheel with my Tundra? (All)

Yes, you can.  Many owners on TundraSolutions.com have reported no problems in 
using a fifth wheel to tow horse trailers, goosenecks, etc.

The most recommended combination from owners has been one made by Reese, using 
a Reese 16K hitch (model number 30047) and a Reese Kwik Slide.

Subject: 3.55 - My seat belts don't retract.  Why does this happen ? (All)

This is a common complaint from Toyota owners.  The seat belts in most every 
line that Toyota makes (Camry, T-100, Tundra, Lexus, etc) do not have springs 
that are powerful enough to pull the seat belt back into place.  In addition, 
the seat belt guides tend to be very narrow, allowing various gunk and debris 
to possibly foul the guide.

Subject: 3.56 - Can I put a snow plow on my Tundra ? (All)

Yes, you can.  Arctic Snow Plows has an adapter mount for Tundras.  However, 
bear in mind that the Tundra frame and suspension are not built for heavy duty 
plowing.  You can use it for light duty, such as driveways, etc.

Arctic Snow Plows can be found at www.arcticsnowplows.com .  It has been 
reported that many Costco and Sam's Club locations sell them as well.

Subject: 3.57 - Can I pressure wash my engine ? (All)

Yes, providing you use a lower pressure washer, and you do not use a cleaning 
additive that can be corrosive to aluminum engine parts.  Castrol SuperClean 
and other "purple" colored cleaners can corrode aluminum parts.  Many recommend 
Simple Green as the best overall washing additive.

Subject: 3.58 - How many crossmembers does the Tundra have, 8 or 9 ? (All)

Well, it depends on how you count things.  There are actually 9 crossmembers.  
There is one set of crossmembers that are formed in the shape of an "X".  In 
the Model Year 2000 literature, this "X" shaped grouping was considered one 
crossmember.  Now it is considered 2.

Subject: 3.59 - Can I add these clear lamp covers to my Tundra ? (All)

In general:  It's not recommended for daily driving use.  Many municipalities 
have ordinances on the books that restrict the use of any lamp cover that is 
not the OEM issued cover.  

In regards to tail and side lamps:  If you do replace the tail and side lamp 
covers with clear covers, and utilize colored bulbs, this would probably pass 
most ordinances.  Check with your local law enforcement agency.

In regards to headlights:  Never put any sort of overlay that restricts or 
reduces the output of the headlamp.  Exceptions to this rule are covers such as 
ones made by X-Pel and 3M (which are clear), and usage of smoke colored 
overlays for show usage.  

For those of you who use clear covers for show usage, Project Import has them 
available for the Tundra.  It is not on their online catalog, but you can go to 
their website and order them for around $60.  Project Import is located at 
www.projectimport.com .

Subject: 3.60 - How does my 4x4 really work ? (All)

How Toyota 4WD systems work (By Steve Clifford, Springfield Toyota, edited for 
clarity):

Sequoia, 4Runner and Land Cruiser

Beginning with the 2000 model year Land Cruiser, Toyota began using a new 4WD 
system called ActiveTrac. This same system was incorporated into all 2001 
4Runners and the new 2001 Sequoias. The same basic system has also been used in 
the Mercedes M Class as well as post 99 AM General Humvees.

These systems operate in essentially the same way with a few exceptions. When 
engaged, you have three open differentials working for you (front, rear and 
center). Open differentials are extremely reliable and require very little 
maintenance. If you have equal traction at all 4 wheels, power is evenly 
divided between them all. If one wheel begins to slip, the open differentials 
begin to send all available power to that one wheel. Normally, this would be 
very bad. This is when a traction control system (TRACS) takes over. TRACS 
operates by applying brakes selectively to a slipping wheel. This braking 
action literally fools the differentials into sending power everywhere except 
the slipping wheel.

When you are in 2WD (in the Sequoia and 4Runner), you still have traction 
control working for you. Obviously, this only will send power left to right but 
this is better than nothing. There is one thing to be careful of in this 
condition. When you are in 2-wheel drive, there is a second part of the TRACS 
that can be hazardous if you are not paying attention. This is the engine speed 
limiter. This combines the braking action of TRACS with a rev limiter. Your 
engine speed will be cut back to 1500 to 2400 RPM. This allows for controlled 
forward movement but it will be slow. The danger with this is if it engages 
when you are trying to pull into fast moving traffic. This rev limiter only 
operates in the 2WD mode, so if you know you have any reduced traction, make 
sure you are in 4WD. 

On all three vehicles, you have the option of locking the center differential. 
It is rare that anybody would ever need to do this. On the Land Cruiser and 
4Runner, this is accomplished by pushing a button on your dash. On the Sequoia, 
you shift into 4 wheel low and shift the transmission into L. This turns off 
the TRACS computer and the VSC system. The vehicle is now in a conventional 4WD 
mode. All 4x4 Toyota trucks have operated in this condition. You should not 
ever use this mode on dry pavement as you will damage the drive system and 
tires.

The other part of this system is the VSC or vehicle skid control. VSC will 
selectively apply brakes and throttle to prevent understeer or oversteer. It 
works in both 2 and 4 wheel drive. This is a rather amazing system and does an 
incredible job of giving the driver control of the vehicle. Understeer is 
responsible for a large number of SUV rollovers and oversteer is very common on 
icy surfaces. The Sequoia will allow you to turn off the VSC but only when you 
are in 4WD. The only reason to turn this off is if you are off road and want to 
be able to slide sideways. On the 4Runner and Land Cruiser, the VSC and TRACS 
are disabled when you lock the center differential.

The Land Cruiser is always in the 4WD mode. The 4Runner and Sequoia can be used 
in either 4WD or 2WD. It is safe to leave either in the 4WD mode at all times. 
You will lose a bit of fuel economy, but will handle better. Unexpected loose 
gravel and slippery surfaces will not be a problem.

To engage the 4WD system on the 4Runner and Sequoia, press the button. The 
green and amber lights will flash on your dash. While it is flashing, the 
system has not fully engaged and you should avoid sharp corners at this time. 
If you are accelerating up a hill, these lights will continue to flash. If this 
happens, take your foot off the gas for a moment and tap the brake. This gives 
the differential a chance to engage fully into the 4WD mode. The same procedure 
applies to disengaging the system.

To get into 4WD low, you must first be in 4WD. Stop the truck and place the 
transmission in neutral. Now, move the floor shifter forward to the low range. 
This takes a firm hand. This mode is only to be used to remove yourself from a 
very difficult situation. Once you are unstuck, shift back into the high gear 
range. 

Tundra and Tacoma

These are typical part time systems. Under good road conditions, you are in 2WD 
with the rear axle getting all the power. Power is again split between the 
right and left wheels. An open differential will route all power to one wheel 
if it can turn faster than the other. If this happens, engage the 4WD system. 
This sends exactly half the power to the front axle where another open 
differential splits power. Between the front and rear axle, you will normally 
be able to gain forward traction but because of the open differentials, there 
is a possibility that you won't. Open differentials are vastly more reliable 
and longer lasting than limited slip differentials, which is why Toyota has 
stuck with them.

With this part time system, you can engage it up to 62 MPH (50 MPH if you dont 
have a push button system) but it really isnt appropriate to drive it at this 
speed. Because the front and rear axles are turning at exactly the same speed, 
you can damage the system on dry pavement. This system is only appropriate for 
more severe conditions. 

The advantages to this type of 4WD are simplicity and speed of engagement. You 
are not relying on brake sensors for your 4WD system and it should be more 
rugged. Also, unlike the Sequoia and 4Runner, the system engages the moment you 
shift into 4WD. The other models take several seconds and feet to engage.

RAV4 and Highlander

These utilize a limited slip center differential and open front and rear 
differentials. It is a viscous coupling center differential. If one of the 
front wheels begins to spin faster than the rear, the heavy liquid in the 
center begins to firm up which routes more power to the rear. Once torque is 
equalized, the 50-50 power split is resumed. This system is always engaged and 
requires no driver input.

It is possible to become stuck with this system. This is because of the open 
front and rear differentials. If both right tires were on ice, all power would 
be routed to these wheels. This is a fairly unlikely occurrence on a light duty 
vehicle like these. On the Highlander, you can get VSC, which includes traction 
control. If the right wheel begins to slip, brakes are applied to this wheel 
and power is sent to the left. On the 4WD model, there is no rev limiter 
associated with the traction control.

(Thanks to Steve Clifford of Springfield Toyota for providing this writeup)

Subject: 3.61 - How do I adjust my headlights ? (All)

Open your hood.  On the top of the headlight assembly will be a little hole.  
Place a #2 Phillips head screwdriver into the hole.   Turning the screwdriver 
counter-clockwise will raise the headlight.  The screw head is geared so that 
it clicks each partial turn.

Subject: 3.62 - Where is my Tachometer ?  (All, V-6 Manual and Automatic Base)

Some people are wondering where the tachometer is on their V-6 Tundras.  Well, 
there isn't one on some Base model V-6 Manual and Automatic Transmission 
Tundras.  Many who have no tachometer have successfully installed a 2 1/16" VDO 
tach with a Autometer A-Pillar pod.  Average prices with install are around 
$200.

The Autometer pod has a part number of #15412.

Subject: 3.63 - Where can I get a new ignition system for my Tundra ? (All)

The Tundra ignition system is a very unusual one that doesn't modify very well. 
 The reason for this is that each cylinder has an individual ignition coil.  
(The V-6 has an ignition coil for every two cylinders.)  The only known 
modification for the Tundra ignition is the MSD "Stacker" ignition system, 
which piggybacks onto the existing system to provide a multiple spark setup for 
specialized modifications such as supercharged nitrous configurations.  The MSD 
part number is # 7020.

Subject: 3.64 - Why does my cargo light shut off when the truck is moving ? 
(All)

Many people have asked as to why the cargo light shuts off when the Tundra 
begins to move.  The cargo light is wired in such a way that when your Tundra 
goes faster than 3 miles per hour, the cargo light shuts off.    An Arizona 
Neurosurgeon who is a Tundra owner has published a detailed web page showing 
what mods to peform if you would like better control of your cargo lamp.  His 
page for the cargo lamp mod can be found at: 
http://www.fastq.com/~louvu/cargolightmod.htm .

Subject: 3.65 - I have a leather interior.  What do I clean it with ? (All)

Nearly every major auto manufacturer recommends Lexol as a leather cleaner.  
Using Lexol is a two step process.  You spray on the Lexol ph Leather Cleaner, 
scrub with a damp cloth, wipe it off, and then spray on the Lexol Leather 
conditioner and rub in, wiping excess with a damp cloth.  Lexol can be found at 
www.lexol.com .

Subject: 3.66 - How do I make my high beams and fog lamps stay on at the same 
time ? (All)

Some owners have complained that their fog lamps go off when their high beam 
headlamps are activated.  An Arizona Neurosurgeon who is a Tundra Owner has 
come up with a detailed web page showing what modifications to perform.  His 
page can be found at http://www.fastq.com/~louvu/foglightmod.htm .

------
Subject: 4.0 - Known problems

Every manufacturer wishes they could build a perfect car, but many can't.  The 
Tundra does have some reported "hiccups" that have showed up in some Tundras, 
and have not been seen in others.  Listed below are some of the more common 
"problems" that have been reported by Tundra Owners in various forums.

If you have any major problems with a Tundra, please go through the process of 
working with your dealer first.  

Here's the recommended escalation steps if your problem can't be resolved:

- Dealer
- Regional Service Administrator
- Arbitration, or Lemon Law

To get familiar with basic lemon laws, please read this set of articles at 
Edmunds.com.  They can be found at 
http://www.edmunds.com/editorial/features/gettingsomelemonaidfromyourlemonmaker
/43774/index.html .

Please check with your local attorney if you have a serious problem with a 
Tundra that renders it unsafe to drive.  Your available recourse also differs 
from state to state.  Also, make sure to document everything !  It is 
preferable to write letters than to do phone calls.  Letters are traceable and 
are considered legal documents in most areas of the United States.  If you do 
make phone calls, note down day, time, and who you spoke with.

Subject: 4.1 - Wheel/Tire Slippage (2000)

Some Tundra owners have reported a severe tire slippage in the wheel.  This can 
then cause a wheel/tire combination to go out of balance.  This slippage has 
been reported on all versions of the Tundra, with both the steel and the alloy 
wheels getting reports of slipping.  The current theory in the postings have 
been that the bead between the wheel and the tire is not holding it's seal 
correctly.

To see if you have a slipping tire, take a piece of chalk or bright crayon, and 
mark the tire's sidewall, matching the mark with a common point on the wheel, 
such as a tire stem, weight, or other recognizable landmark.  If you suffer 
from wheel slip, the mark on the tire sidewall will not line up with the 
landmark that you used as a reference.

Subject: 4.2 - Brake Problems (All)

There has been some problems with the front brake pads and shoes causing a 
vibration when stopping.  The NTSHA has in it's database a Technical Service 
Bulleting (TSB) for this problem.  Listed below is the exact text from the 
NTSHA.

Service Bulletin Number: BR00300 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 109
Date of Bulletin: 0003
NHTSA Item Number: SB610951 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: BRAKES:HYDRAULIC:DISC:PADS AND SHOES
Summary: INFORMATION INTRODUCING NEW FRONT BRAKE PAD KITS TO 
REDUCE FRONT BRAKE VIBRATION. *TT

If you feel you have a problem, please contact your dealer's service department 
immediately !

Subject: 4.3 - Vibration problems (All)

Many Tundra owners have complained about a moderate to severe vibration problem 
in their Tundras.  This vibration problem ranges from steering wheel shimmy to 
"martini shaker" type vibrations that are felt in the seats and the cab.

This vibration is normally felt from 35-70 MPH, and has been found in 2000 and 
2001 model year Tundras, 4x2 and 4x4, TRD and non-TRD variants, with nearly any 
wheel/tire combination around. 

There are many causes for this vibration.  If you are experiencing vibrations, 
please have the following fixes performed by you or your dealer before taking 
any further action such as bushing replacements, lemon law disputes, etc.

1) Verify Tire Pressures - Make sure that your tire pressure is at a range of 
35PSI Cold max.

2) Verify that your tires are in balance - Toyota factory wheels are notorious 
for letting the tire bead shift, thereby allowing the tire balance to become 
incorrect.  When your tires are balanced, make sure that your dealer or tire 
outlet is using a proper tire balancer that can handle lug-centric rims.  
Please see Section 3.32 and Section 4.1 for more information.

3) Verify that your brake pads, shoes, drums, and rotors are in spec and not 
out of round.  See Section 4.2 and Section 4.13 for more information.

4) Verify that your Drive Shaft is in alignment.  Please see Section 4.16 for 
more information

5) Verify that your vehicle's alignment is in specification.  Listed below are 
the Toyota Factory Specs for the 2000 and 2001 Model Year Tundras.

2000 Toyota Tundra Factory Specs:
Camber: .025 +/- 0.75 degrees
Caster: 1.27 +/- 0.75 degrees
Total Toe: 0.08+/- 0.20 degrees

2001 Toyota Tundra Factory Specs (?):
Camber: .025 +/- .075 degrees
Caster: 2.00 +/- 0.75 degrees
Total Toe: 0.08 +/- 0.20 degrees

If you do take your vehicle in for alignment, make sure that the alignment 
specs are as close to the following numbers as possible:

Camber: 0.23/0.27 degrees
Caster: 1.93/2.03 degrees
Total Toe: 0.09 degrees

These fixes have been tested by many members of the Tundrasolutions web page, 
the FAQ author included.  The fixes has corrected about 95% of the vibration 
problems felt or reported by Tundrasolutions members.

Subject: 4.4 - Tire Pressure (All)

Recommended Tire Pressure is 26PSI in the front, 29PSI in the rear.  This is 
what is specified by Toyota.  However, many owners have found that their gas 
mileage has suffered from these tire pressures.  In the 4x4 models with stock 
tires BF Goodrich Rugged Trail T/A's, you can inflate your PSI to around 35.
  
Subject: 4.5 - Oil dipstick/Oil Levels (2000)

There is a possible problem with the dipstick in the 2000 model year Tundra 
being too short to reach the oil levels properly.  The stock oil capacity is 
6.5 quarts.  If you fill to that level, your dipstick may not show the proper 
level.

The fix for this is to order a 2001 model year Oil Dipstick.  Part number is 
15301-50101.  Cost is roughly $15.  

There are rumors that Toyota Engineering will issue a TSB for this issue.  If a 
TSB is issued, you may get this upgrade for free.

Subject: 4.6 - Bushings (All)

Some people have complained about excessive play in their suspension bushings.  
This is not common to every Tundra.  Daystar (a well known suspension parts 
company) is currently designing a replacement bushing set for the stock 
suspension of the Tundra.  Time will tell to see how well this kit will do.

Daystar is selling a Tundra upgrade kit.  You can contact Daystar at 
800-595-7659

Subject: 4.7 - Driveline "Clunks" (All)

There is a known problem with some Tundras in which a "clunking" noise is 
coming out of the drive train.  The known solution has been to regrease the 
components of the drive line.  This has been a longtime acknowledged issue with 
both Tacomas and Tundras, with no long term ill effects.

Some owners of Tundras have said that a Hellweg rear anti-sway bar has removed 
the "clunking" noise due to a tightening of the overall suspension.  Long term 
testing will show if this is an effective fix.

Other complaints have been that while shifting from 1st to 2nd gear, a pause 
will occur, then a great surge of speed will force the transmission to catch 
up. The culprit has been a clogged valve body in the transmission.  

Subject: 4.8 - Tundra Not Starting ? (All)

Some owners have complained about the Tundra not starting properly, and it 
would take two or three attempts to start the vehicle.  

According to posts, the Tundra onboard computer requires an extra second to 
complete diagnostics and start the ignition sequence.  This is normal and will 
require owners to keep the key in the start position for a little bit longer 
than most people are used to.

Subject: 4.9 - Door Rattles (2000)

Some owners have complained that their Access Cab rear doors rattle.  Many 
dealers have corrected this problem by readjusting or replacing the latches of 
the rear and front doors.  See Section 3.39 for some symptoms and cures.

Subject: 4.10 - Arm Rest Wear (All)

Some owners have complained about the door arm rest panel wearing abnormally.  
According to some posts on www.tundrasolutions.com, the door rest panel will be 
fixed through a Technical Service Bulletin that was supposed to be released in 
September of 2000, but has not been available as of the date of this FAQ.  2001 
Tundras were supposed to incorporate this fix, however, some 2001 Tundra owners 
have reported wear on the armrests with as little as 500 miles of driving.

Subject: 4.11 - Paint Wear (All)

Some owners have warned others about how "thin" Toyota's paint is, especially 
in high wear areas such as fender overmolds, etc.  This is a common problem 
that can be protected using some sort of shield or X-Pel's ScotchCal product.

Other Toyota owners in general have complained about similar problems with 
their vehicles.  It seems that Toyota is using a thinner base paint of some 
sort that is prone to damage.

Subject: 4.12 - Trailer Wiring Harness Problems (2000)

Please see section 3.6 Listed above.

Subject: 4.13 - Rear Brake adjustment problems (2000, early 2001)

There has been some reported problems in which some owners have had rear brake 
drums put "out of round" by the application of the emergency brake.  This can 
be caused by incorrect adjustments from the factory, port distributor, or 
dealership in the cable, star adjusters, and bell crank linkages of the rear 
brakes.  This problem can be aggravated if the parking brake is applied while 
the drums are hot.  Adjustment of the linkages and bell cranks, along with 
replacement/resurfacing of the rear brake components are sufficient to correct 
the problem.  Some have also had the star adjusters replaced per TSB BR006-00.  
Listed below is a paraphrased version of the TSB:

Introduction: New parking brake struts (star wheel adjusters) have been 
developed to reduce the possibility of rear brake vibration on 2000 and 2001 
model year Tundra vehicles. The number of teeth on the star has been reduced 
from 30 to 26 teeth.

Applicable Vehicles: 2000-2001 model year Tundra vehicles.  VIN Range of 
5TB####1#1S142446 onward per TSB Update of January 12, 2001.

Parts information: {four part numbers are listed with descriptions including 
the adjuster assembly shoe both right and left, brake drum and rear brake shoe 
kit}

Repair Procedure: 
1. Grind rear brake drums with brake lathe to within serviceable limits.
2. If the drums are unserviceable or above maximum inside diameter, replace the 
drums.
3. If there is uneven wear on the lining, replace the left and right brake 
shoes.
4. Replace the parking brake shoe strut sets.
5. Adjust the parking brake to specifications.
6. Reinstall the rear wheels, and torque wheel nuts to : Torque: 113 N.m (1150 
KGF.cm, 83 ft.lbf)

Subject: 4.14 - 4x4 Actuator Rod problem (2000)

Some 2000 model year Tundra owners have reported problems with their 4x4 
Tundras not going into 4-Lo and hearing a grinding sound when that happens.  

The solution is a mis-machined shaft in the front servo assembly and another 
mis-machined shaft in the transfer case.  Many owners have had to have their 
actuator rods replaced per Toyota Engineering.  Others have requested that 
their entire Transfer Case be replaced.  In either case, owners have reported a 
downtime of roughly two weeks without their Tundra.

This problem may not be recognized by most Toyota tech staffs and their support 
system.  Most owners who have had this problem have had to require the 
dealership contact Toyota Engineering directly for the fix.

Subject: 4.15 - 60/40 Bench Seat TSB (Model Year 2000 ONLY !)

Toyota has issued a Technical Service Bulletin as of September 2000 in regards 
to all 2000 model year Tundras equipped with a 60/40 bench seat.  

The TSB number is NVH014-00.  It involves the installation of a Seat Track kit 
with a part number of 04009-1310C.  The installation involves the placement of 
a track that fits underneath the center portion of the bench seat that meets 
with another track that is drilled into the transmission tunnel "hump".  

This TSB as of November 2000 has not been listed in either the NHTSA or the 
alldata.com website.

Subject: 4.16 - Misaligned drive shaft (All)

Some Tundra owners have complained about a misaligned drive shaft causing a 
mild body vibration.  There is an easy fix for this, taken from the pages of 
Tundrasolutions.com. (Thanks to DJ and Hunter Engineering Company for posting 
this fix on Tundrasolutions.com !)

"Crawl under the vehicle with a long piece of string and some duct tape (the 
handyman's secret weapon). Tape one end of the string to the bottom center of 
the flange at the forward end of the front section of the drive shaft. This is 
just at the back end of the transmission. Now stretch the string under and 
along the drive shaft and tape the other end to the bottom center of the flange 
at the rear end of the rear section of the drive shaft. This is at the front 
end of the rear axle. The drive shaft should lie directly above this stretched 
string.

Now look at the center carrier bearing. If it is offset to the left or right, 
even as little as 1/8 inch, it is in the wrong place. Loosen the two mounting 
bolts and center it over the string, making sure it is perpendicular to the 
string. Tighten the bolts to 30 ft-lbs, as the service manual recommends."

Subject: 4.90 - What is a TSB ?

A TSB is a Technical Service Bulletin.  It generally appears in the form of a 
service manual add-on or notice that is updated quarterly by the manufacturer 
and sent out to dealers.

TSB's perform three primary functions.

1) Informative/Instructive: These types of TSB's add information that is 
normally not needed in the owner's manual but may be necessary to 
operate/program an additional accessory or perform a certain duty.  Two 
examples of this are the seatbelt extender instructions (TSB BO004-99), and how 
to "dinghy" tow your Tundra (TSB AX001-01).

2) Dealer preparation: These types of TSB's give specific instructions as to 
how to handle certain types of situations.  For example, TSB# PG006-00 deals 
with how a dealer can order a replacement Emission Control Label in case your 
hood gets wrecked and has to be replaced.

3) Modifications: This type of TSB is used for a wide variety of reasons.  Some 
can be as innocent as a new replacement part or modification for an item that 
is non-crucial in the safety and integrity of the vehicle, (for example, TSB 
BO013-00 deals with a modification of the interior Dome Lamp) to actual 
modifications of the truck that is involved with a major component (such as TSB 
# BR003-00 dealing with replacing front brake pad kits if you have problems 
with them.)  This type of TSB released is sometimes done in place of a recall.

In general, TSB's that are performed by the dealership while the Tundra is 
under warranty usually will be done for free.  

There are times in which a TSB that is done to your vehicle is not covered 
under warranty and you can be charged for parts and labor.  For example, the 
Seat Track Kit for model year 2000 Tundras with bench seats are not required to 
be installed into your Tundra, and it does nothing for the safety or proper 
operation of your Tundra.  It does reduce 95% of the vibration in the seat, but 
the lack of the bracket installation does not compromise the safety or 
integrity of the vehicle in general.  In cases such as this, you may be charged 
for the installation.  (Please note, this is highly unlikely).

Please be aware that in many cases, TSB's cover specific "ranges" within an 
entire production run and do not cover every vehicle made during that tooling 
run.  For example, TSB EG003-00 covers a limited number of VIN's within the 
range of 5TB####1#YS030022 that may have a cooling reservoir problem.  (Note, 
The FAQ considers a production run to be a batch of vehicles done from a 
specific calendar date to another specific calendar date.  A tooling run is a 
group of consecutive production runs using the same molds, parts, sheet metal, 
etc.  Tooling runs can span multiple model years and most if not all of the 
parts are interchangeable from one model year to the next in a tooling run.  A 
new tooling run is when a major group of items, such as exterior sheet metal, 
frame, etc. prompts the factory to re-tool (reconfigure) all the robotic 
machines and retrain all the manufacturing personnel to produce the revised 
vehicle.)

If you have any questions in regards to TSB's and your Tundra, please contact 
your dealer or your service advisor.

Subject: 4.91 - What is a recall ?

A Manufacturer's recall is a situation in which most vehicles produced in a 
production or tooling run (see explanation in Section 4.90 of what a production 
or tooling run means) has a severe enough flaw in a component or group of 
components in that continued operation of the vehicle without modification or 
repair could result in personal injury or death of the driver and/or occupants 
of the vehicle.  This type of recall is known as a national recall.  An 
excellent case of a national recall is where Ford Motor Company recalled a 
group of vehicles to have their ignition switches replaced.

Recalls can also be regional.  A regional recall is one where specific vehicles 
were sent or modified in a certain geographical area.  A known example of a 
regional recall is mentioned in section 3.7 - Towing Hitches.

Subject: 4.96 - Unlisted Technical Service Bulletins

This section is dedicated to unlisted Technical Service Bulletins (TSB) that 
has not been included in the majority of databases, including the NHTSA, 
Alldata.com, and Toyota Dealers.

TSB Number	Issue Date		Subject
NVH014-00	September 2000		Bracket kit retrofit for 2000 Model 
Year Tundras with 60/40 Split Bench Seat
BR006-00	November 2000		Star Adjuster on rear brake 
drums/Parking Brake assembly (see section 4.13)
EL011-00		October 2000		Daytime Running Light Disabling 
Procedure (see section 3.25)


Subject: 4.97 - Technical Service Bulletins on the Web

This section is dedicated to the Technical Service Bulletins (TSB) that have 
been reported on the Internet.  This information is not generated from the NTSB 
or the NHTSA, but from www.alldata.com.

Listed below, by category/class, is a summary of the TSB's issued for specific 
versions of the Tundra.

2WD - All Engines

Bulletins for 2000 Toyota Truck Tundra Regular Cab 2WD V6-3378cc 3.4L DOHC 
(5VZ-FE) MFI/Toyota Truck Tundra Access Cab SR5 2WD V6-3378cc 3.4L DOHC 
(5VZ-FE) MFI/Toyota Truck Tundra Access Cab SR5 2WD V8-4664cc 4.7L DOHC 
(2UZ-FE) MFI/Toyota Truck Tundra Access Cab LTD 2WD V8-4664cc 4.7L DOHC 
(2UZ-FE) MFI

Service Bulletins
     TSB Number   Issue Date  TSB Title 
 PG032-99       DEC 99       Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure 
 EL006-99       OCT 99       Engine Immobilizer System Precautions. 
 PG031-99       OCT 99       Tire Inflation & Wheel Lug Torque Reference Chart 
 PG026-99       SEP 99       Front License Plate Installation 
 PG021-99       SEP 99       2000 Pre-Delivery Service 
 TC003-99       MAY 99       Automatic Transmission Fluids 
 ST002-99       MAY 99       Steering Flutter 
 AX007-99       MAY 99       Keyless Entry Remote Control Programming 
 PG017-99       MAY 99       Tundra Supplemental PDS Procedure 
 AX006-99       APR 99       RS3000 TVIP Programming Changes For GBS 
 AX005-99       APR 99       Toyota VIP RS3000 Programming 
 AX004-99       MAR 99       Toyota 'Dinghy' Towing Guide 
 BO004-99       MAR 99       Tundra Seatbelt Extenders 
 EG003-00       MAY 00       Coolant Overflow Reservoir Modification 
 AX005-00       APR 00       RS3000 TVIP Automatic Door Lock Feature 
Programming 
 PG006-00       MAR 00       CA/50 State Certified Emission Control Label 
Ordering 
 BO013-00       MAR 00       Room (Dome) Lamp Lens Modification 
 AX001-00       MAR 00       Toyota dinghy towing guide 
 BR003-00       MAR 00       FRONT BRAKE VIBRATION 
 PA001-00       JAN 00       2000 Model Year Paint Codes 
 BO002-00       JAN 00       Seat Belt Extender 
 PG001-00       JAN 00       2000 Technical Service Bulletin Information 

4WD - All Engines

Bulletins for 2000 Toyota Truck Tundra Regular Cab SR5 4WD V8-4664cc 4.7L DOHC 
(2UZ-FE) MFI/Toyota Truck Tundra Regular Cab SR5 4WD V6-3378cc 3.4L DOHC 
(5VZ-FE) MFI/Toyota Truck Tundra Access Cab SR5 4WD V8-4664cc 4.7L DOHC 
(2UZ-FE) MFI/Toyota Truck Tundra Access Cab LTD 4WD V8-4664cc 4.7L DOHC 
(2UZ-FE) MFI

Service Bulletins
     TSB Number   Issue Date  TSB Title 
 PG032-99       DEC 99       Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure 
 EL006-99       OCT 99       Engine Immobilizer System Precautions. 
 PG031-99       OCT 99       Tire Inflation & Wheel Lug Torque Reference Chart 
 PG026-99       SEP 99       Front License Plate Installation 
 PG021-99       SEP 99       2000 Pre-Delivery Service 
 DL001-99       AUG 99       Propeller Shaft Joint Grease 
 TC003-99       MAY 99       Automatic Transmission Fluids 
 ST002-99       MAY 99       Steering Flutter 
 AX007-99       MAY 99       Keyless Entry Remote Control Programming 
 PG017-99       MAY 99       Tundra Supplemental PDS Procedure 
 AX006-99       APR 99       RS3000 TVIP Programming Changes For GBS 
 AX005-99       APR 99       Toyota VIP RS3000 Programming 
 AX004-99       MAR 99       Toyota 'Dinghy' Towing Guide 
 BO004-99       MAR 99       Tundra Seatbelt Extenders 
 EG003-00       MAY 00       Coolant Overflow Reservoir Modification 
 AX005-00       APR 00       RS3000 TVIP Automatic Door Lock Feature 
Programming 
 PG006-00       MAR 00       CA/50 State Certified Emission Control Label 
Ordering 
 BO013-00       MAR 00       Room (Dome) Lamp Lens Modification 
 AX001-00       MAR 00       Toyota dinghy towing guide 
 BR003-00       MAR 00       FRONT BRAKE VIBRATION 
 PA001-00       JAN 00       2000 Model Year Paint Codes 
 BO002-00       JAN 00       Seat Belt Extender 
 PG001-00       JAN 00       2000 Technical Service Bulletin Information 


Subject: 4.98 - Technical Service Bulletins from the NTSB/NHTSA

This section is dedicated to all Technical Service Bulletins that have been 
reported to the NTSB and the NHTSA.  The following TSB's have been reported to 
date:

Service Bulletin Number: BR00300 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 109
Date of Bulletin: 0003
NHTSA Item Number: SB610951 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: BRAKES:HYDRAULIC:DISC:PADS AND SHOES
Summary: INFORMATION INTRODUCING NEW FRONT BRAKE PAD KITS TO REDUCE FRONT BRAKE 
VIBRATION. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: TC99010 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 587
Date of Bulletin: 9905
NHTSA Item Number: SB605878 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:BATTERY:CARRIER:HOLD DWN
Summary: NEW MODEL LAUNCH QUALITY ACTIVITY TO REPLACE THE BATTERY HOLD-DOWN 
CLAMP ON CERTAIN EARLY PRODUCTION VEHICLES. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: TC99010 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 667
Date of Bulletin: 9905
NHTSA Item Number: SB606670 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:BATTERY:CARRIER:HOLD DWN
Summary: TOYOTA WILL INITIATE A NEW MODEL LAUNCH QUALITY ACTIVITY TO REPLACE 
THE BATTERY HOLD DOWN CLAMP ON CERTAIN EARLY PRODUCTION VEHICLES. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: EG00300 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 134
Date of Bulletin: 0005
NHTSA Item Number: SB613509 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM:OTHER PARTS
Summary: SOME VEHICLES WITHIN VIN 5TB****1*YS030022 MAY EXPERIENCE A SLIGHT 
COOLANT LEAK FROM THE COOLANT OVERFLOW RESERVOIR VENT UNDER ROUGH DRIVING 
CONDITIONS. *MR 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: PG02699 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 786
Date of Bulletin: 9909
NHTSA Item Number: SB607870 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: EQUIPMENT:VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER AND PLATE
Summary: INSTALLATION OF FRONT LICENSE PLATE. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: BO00499 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 468
Date of Bulletin: 9903
NHTSA Item Number: SB604668 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: INTERIOR SYSTEMS:SEAT AND SHOULDER BELTS AND BELT ANCHOR:OTHER PARTS
Summary: TOYOTA CUSTOMERS WHO FIND IT NECESSARY TO INCREASE THE LENGTH OF THEIR 
SEAT BELTS MAY OBTAIN SEAT BELT EXTENDERS AT NO COST THROUGH THEIR LOCAL TOYOTA 
DEALER. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: 032499 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 518
Date of Bulletin: 9903
NHTSA Item Number: SB605175 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: INTERIOR SYSTEMS:SEAT AND SHOULDER BELTS AND BELT ANCHOR:OTHER PARTS
Summary: INFORMATION REGARDING SEATBELT EXTENDERS. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: BO01300 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 109
Date of Bulletin: 0003
NHTSA Item Number: SB610959 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: LIGHTING:GENERAL OR UNKNOWN COMPONENT:COURTESY LIGHTS
Summary: SUBJECT REGARDING ROOM (DOME) LAMP LENS MODIFICATION FOR VEHICLES 
STARTING WITH VIN 5TBBT4416YS032558. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: 001404 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 100
Date of Bulletin: 0004
NHTSA Item Number: SB610078 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: LIGHTING:GENERAL OR UNKNOWN COMPONENT:HIGH MOUNTED STOP LAMP
Summary: INFORMATION REGARDING THE SSC U01 2000 MODELYEAR STOP LAMP. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: DL00199 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 608
Date of Bulletin: 9908
NHTSA Item Number: SB6088659
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: POWER TRAIN:DRIVELINE:SHAFT CHAIN:PROPELLOR:DRIVE
Summary: THIS SERVICE BULLETIN PROVIDES THE LOCATION OF THE GREASE FITTINGS FOR 
THE PROPELLER SHAFT JOINTS. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: DL00199 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 100
Date of Bulletin: 9908
NHTSA Item Number: SB610052 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: POWER TRAIN:DRIVELINE:SHAFT CHAIN:PROPELLOR:DRIVE
Summary: THIS BULLETIN PROVIDES THE LOCATION OF THE GREASE FITTINGS FOR THE 
PROPELLER SHAFT JOINTS AS WELL AS THE TYPE OF GREASE TO USE WITH EACH FITTING 
LOCATION. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: ST00299 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 591
Date of Bulletin: 9905
NHTSA Item Number: SB605915 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: STEERING
Summary: PROCEDURES FOR IMPROVING A STEERING FLUTTER CONDITION ON VEHICLES 
WITHIN CERTAIN VIN RANGES. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: 032999 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 518
Date of Bulletin: 9903
NHTSA Item Number: SB605181 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: STRUCTURE
Summary: SUBJECT REGARDING EXTERIOR PAINT COLORS. *TT 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Service Bulletin Number: PG01799 
Bulletin Sequence Number: 591
Date of Bulletin: 9905
NHTSA Item Number: SB605918 
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2000
Component: STRUCTURE
Summary: SUBJECT REGARDING TUNDRA SUPPLEMENTAL PRE-DELIVERY SERVICE (PDS) 
PROCEDURE. *TT 

Subject: 4.99 - Recalls

This section will be totally dedicated to national recalls.  The following 
recalls have been done on the Tundra to date:

NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number: 99V347003
Component: LIGHTING:LAMP OR SOCKET:TAIL LIGHTS
Manufacturer: TOYOTA MOTOR CO., LTD.
Mfg. Campaign #: Y01 
Year: 2000
Make: TOYOTA TRUCK
Model: TUNDRA
Potential Number of Units Affected: 16472
Manufactured From: FEB 1999 To: JUL 1999 
Year of Recall: '99
Type of Report: Vehicle 
Summary: 
Vehicle Description: Sport utility vehicles. The tail light socket may have 
been improperly molded, resulting in the locking tab having insufficient force 
to retain the bulb. If the bulb falls out of the socket, the brake or tail lamp 
function cannot occur. 

Dealers will replace the tail lamp sockets. Owner notification began February 
25, 2000. Owners who take their vehicles to an authorized dealer on an agreed 
upon service date and do not receive the free remedy within a reasonable time 
should contact Toyota at 1-800-331-4331. Also contact the National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration's Auto Safety Hotline at 1-888-DASH-2-DOT 
(1-888-327-4236). 

-----

Subject: 5.0 - Where can I find Resources ?

There are many places to find resources for the Tundra.  Listed below are some 
of the more common places to find information that may not be listed on the 
FAQ.

Subject: 5.1 - Web Sites

Tundra Solutions - www.tundrasolutions.com
This site has one of the largest registered Tundra owners groups in the 
Internet.  Chances are, if you have a problem or question, it will be found or 
answered here.

Tacoma Territory Off Roaders Association (TTORA) - www.ttora.com / 
www.tacomaterritory.com
This site is THE definitive place for Toyota Tacoma trucks.  Since there are 
some interchangable parts between the Tundra and the Tacoma, this FAQ lists 
their website as a source of good information.  

Big Toy Trucks - www.bigtoytrucks.com
This site was getting a new lease on life since a new "owner" has taken over.  
Was a good source of information with active mailing lists and message boards.  
However, this site has disappeared and is inactive as of 9/13/00.

4x4 Wire - http://www.outdoorwire.com/4x4/toyota/
This is a relatively new site that started up to try and take the place of the 
hole left from Big Toy Trucks.  They have a mailing list as well.  This is 
mostly a Tacoma/4Runner based board with a smattering of Tundra stuff.

Awesome Tundra Trucks - http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/awesometundratrucks
This Yahoo site started in December of 1999 and has message board and a chat 
room for all Tundra owners and enthusiasts.

Tundra Toys - www.tundratoys.com
This site, unfortunately, has disappeared.  We know that the web site was up 
for sale, but it recently vanished.

Club Tundra - www.clubtundra.com
This site was mentioned recenly on USENET.  It's a fledgling board similar to 
Tundra Solutions.

Toy Tundra - www.toytundra.com
This site is mainly a place to post stories and pictures of Tundra owners and 
their modifications.  It's a newer board that recently started as of November 
of 2000.

Marshall Brain's HowStuffWorks.com - www.howstuffworks.com
This site is a wonderland of everything mechanical (and some that isn't !)  It 
started out as a newsletter, evolved into a simple coffee table style book for 
teenagers, and has expanded into an award winning website.  It has explanations 
for many vehicular items, such as an animated explanation as to how an 
automatic transmission works, and many non-mechanical explainations, such as 
how guide dogs get trained.  

Tundra Territory - www.tundraterritory.com
This fledgling site is owned by a Toyota dealership (at least from the whois 
listing).  It's not fully up yet as of the time of this FAQ publishing.

Subject 5.2 - USENET

The following forums are Toyota and Toyota Truck related newsgroups.  You can 
access them by using a newsreader like Outlook Express, Netscape, WinVN, or 
www.deja.com on the web.

alt.autos.toyota
alt.autos.toyota.trucks

This forum is a generic truck related newsgroup.

alt.autos.4x4

Subject 5.3 - Internet Relay Chat

There is a forum available on Internet Relay Chat for Tundra owners.  On 
DALNet's IRC Servers, there is a forum called #tundrasolutions.  It seems to be 
related to the TundraSolutions web site.  

6.0 Revision History

7/00 - First gathering of data started, Alpha revisions created for editing.
8/7/00 - First Beta Copy created
8/8/00 - Added Trailer harness information
8/9/00 - Added Gasoline and Skid Plate Information
8/9/00 - Added Daystar bushing information and Oil Pressure information
8/9/00 - Added information on ClubTundra.com, USENET forums
8/9/00 - Added how to view info, fixed word wrap problem
8/9/00 - Added USENET Headers
8/9/00 - Submitted FAQ for approval from news.answers moderators
8/10/00 - Added copyright information for Toyota, added TSB's from alldata.com
8/10/00 - Added door information, hub/lug centric rim information
8/14/00 - Added information on cruise control, Muth Mirror Systems, A/C
8/18/00 - Added information on Power Adapter modification
8/24/00 - Fixed numbering order. 
9/13/00 - Added body lift, Added Sequoia details, door latch info, Ivan Stewart 
Package info, armrest wear, door beeper disable.
10/10/00 - Added Gentex ECT Mirror to FAQ, added to the emblem removal, added 
information about Overlander Outfitters seat covers, added rain gutter info.
10/11/00 - Updated NHTSA TSB list, added 4-Lo grinding problem.
10/30/00 - Added TSB for 60/40 split bench, Camber/Caster/Toe settings, updated 
Sequoia and Tundra generic information in Sections 1 and 2.
11/11/00 - Added Section for unlisted TSB's, Bellof HID Systems, ABS Clunk, TRD 
SEMA Demo, rail dust, drive shaft fix, A/C Odor, J.L. Stealthbox info.
11/21/00 - Added www.toytundra.com, repair manual part numbers.
11/28/00 - Added Brake pedal lube problem.
11/30/00 - Changed Vibration section, added octane explaination.
12/08/00 - Modifed headers to reflect no status changes in regards to 
alt.answers application, added TRD parts info.
12/11/00 - Added TSB for star adjusters on rear brake assembly, edited content 
overall for clarity, added TSB and recall definitions, added Indiglo(tm) style 
gauges.
12/14/00 - Added tapping noise entry
12/16/00 - Added SR5 option code history
1/10/01 - Removed Duplicate of oil dipstick, added more detail to door lock 
issue, added 2001 NHTSA crash test results.
1/11/01 - Added detail on TRD lowering package, added discussion of Brembro/TRD 
brake replacement kit, lemon law info.
2/11/01 - Received approval from *.answers moderators for submission to 
newsgroups.
2/12/01 - Added Downey Suspension Lift Kit information, throttle body spacer 
info, fifth wheel info, snow plow info, pressure washing info.
2/13/01 - Added crossmember information.
2/14/01 - Added lamp cover entry
2/27/01 - Added TSB for Daytime running lamps, added additional disclaimer 
information, modified Trailer Wiring harness information
3/12/01 - Fixed entry for ABS Clunk issue, tire information, supercharger 
information, minor editing changes.
4/14/01 - Added 2001 Tundra information for Drawtite harness.
4/15/01 - Delineated which fixes apply to specific model years.
5/08/01 - Added 4x4 systems description to Section 3.60
5/10/01 - Added TSB BR006-00 information as to VIN number range.
5/11/01 - Made general modifications and editing clarity changes for Throttle 
Body, AC Odors, etc.
5/12/01 - Added section for Double Cab Tundra for 2003.  Modified information 
for Limited Slip Differential.
5/23/01 - Added section for headlight alignment, added information on Lug 
Centric Ivan Stewart wheels.
5/24/01 - Added section for missing tach on base V-6 Tundras, MSD stacker 
ignition system.
5/30/01 - Cargo light questions.
6/14/01 - Added more information on fifth wheel towing, Tundra Safety from 
IIHS.  Removed many dead URL links due to TundraSolutions board modification.
6/15/01 - Added more information on tire sizing and added URL for a tire 
calculator.
6/26/01 - Added Lexol as a leather cleaner, JBA Header information, TrimBrite 
info.
7/6/01 - Added mods for cargo switch lamp, DRL's, and High Beam/Fogs.
7/11/01 - Added information on LSD standard option for SR5 2002's
7/12/01 - Added ARB AirLocker information. Modified Supercharger section to 
more accurately reflect proper information.
7/13/01 - Added TundraTerritory.com listing.
7/14/01 - Added Project Import information for Clear Covers.

User Contributions:

MGTundra
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 7, 2012 @ 2:14 pm
Having idle problems with my 2000 Tundra V8 Will run ok for a few days then the idle starts going to about 100 before it dies. Trottle motor changed out and ran ok for awhile then has started again. Thinking maybe something else is going on.

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