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How did the iodine move into the dialysis tubing? Did it...

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Question by sam
Submitted on 3/20/2004
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How did the iodine move into the dialysis tubing? Did it move into both tubes?....Does starch move through the dialysis tubing by diffusion? How do you konw this?


Answer by nmr
Submitted on 1/23/2005
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Starch is a polysacharide and cannot cross across the small pores of the dialysis tube as it is too big in size (molecular mass). Iodine moves into the dialysis tubing by diffusion (diffuses through the pores from a region of high concentration to a region of low concentration) across the dialysis tube pores.

 

Answer by Alex
Submitted on 10/2/2005
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The starch stayed inside the dialysis tubing because it was too large to pass through the tubing.  I knew that it stayed inside because it reacted with the KI, causing the substance inside the tubing to turn blue, different than its original milky color.  Had the starch traveled through the tubing, the outside substance would have also turned blue, which it didnít.
The KI diffused into the liquid in the tubing because it was, like the glucose, trying to make equilibrium among the two substances.  I knew this because the KI reacted with the starch in the tubing, which, as I said above, caused the substance inside the tubing to turn blue.

 

Answer by Jackie
Submitted on 10/11/2005
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diffison

 

Answer by Sila
Submitted on 10/19/2005
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Starch is a macromolecule, so it can't pass the semi-permeable dialysis tubing, as always mentioned. However, we did yesterday the diffusion experiment, and we observed that the outside of the tubing was changing color, which indicates that starch goes outside. We can't understand how it occurred, but the different sections of the lab found the same results?!?!

 

Answer by Goatse
Submitted on 11/1/2005
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Well, you see, iodine is made up of small ninjas, thousands of them.  These ninjas cut through the cell membrane with their katanas.  Now, the pirates that guarded the borders of the cell membrane weren't very happy with this so they started attacking back.  Obviously the iodine ninjas win and were able to contaminate the cornstarch with their poison, causing it to decay and become dark purple in color.

 

Answer by David
Submitted on 4/29/2006
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No the starch does not move through the tubing. only the iodine did

the tubing is a semi-permeable membrane that only allows iodine to pass through. however, when the concentration of iodine is greater in the beaker, it is going to move into the tubing for the whole beaker/tubing to reach equilibrium

 

Answer by chris
Submitted on 10/16/2006
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the solute (water + iodine) moved through the semipermiable tubing through osmosis

 

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