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how and why do hurricanes;typhoons @ cyclones form?

<< Back to: FAQ: HURRICANES, TYPHOONS AND TROPICAL CYCLONES (Part 1 of 2)

Question by boo
Submitted on 2/5/2004
Related FAQ: FAQ: HURRICANES, TYPHOONS AND TROPICAL CYCLONES (Part 1 of 2)
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how and why do hurricanes;typhoons @ cyclones form?


Answer by UNKOWN
Submitted on 4/29/2004
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Hurricanes form when warm, wet air masses over the Atlantic Ocean heat up, expand, and rise up into the sky.  Underneath the mass, a rush of wind suddenly appears to form a 'donut' shaped 'cloud'.

Hurricanes last for about 9-12 days.

 

Answer by someone
Submitted on 9/11/2004
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yes but why?

 

Answer by pizzahut
Submitted on 9/29/2004
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hutrricanes form when warm moist air mixes with high winds near a ocean and a hurricane appears in a doughnut shaped for of a cloud.

 

Answer by George
Submitted on 9/30/2004
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cheese

 

Answer by UNKNWON
Submitted on 9/30/2004
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How do hurricanes form?

Hurricanes begin as clusters of thunderstorms (tropical disturbances) over the warm waters of the Atlantic, Carribean and Gulf of Mexico.


As development continues, they develop into Tropical Depressions, then Tropical Storms (at this point, the storm is named), and finally, hurricanes.


Hurricanes are categorized on the Saffir-Simpson Scale, ranging from a category 1 (weakest) to a category 5 (strongest).


 

Answer by fag
Submitted on 10/4/2004
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go to hell

 

Answer by Ambino/ Amber
Submitted on 11/15/2004
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Hurricanes are formed by 3 steps.
First, the oceans must be warm enough to give the hurricane moisture.
Second, Atmospheric moisture from the oceans
must combine with the heat and energy to make the engine needed to propel the hurricane.
Third, you have to find it out your self.

 

Answer by Cat Girl
Submitted on 11/17/2004
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U suck. All i know is that a hurricane has to do with water!!!!1

 

Answer by Nicole
Submitted on 11/18/2004
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Hurricanes form mostly during the warmer months of the year. During warm weather the sun heats the oceans surface all day long.
Some of the water changes into a mist called water vapor. The warm water vapor rises high into the air as it does this cooler air ruches into replace it. This cause winds to form.

 

Answer by better than everyone
Submitted on 2/27/2005
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In meteorology, the study of motion and atmospheric phenomena of the atmosphere a cyclone is the rotation of a volume of air with low atmospheric pressure, which causes high winds in the area. Cyclones also cause a variety of other disasters such as hurricanes and typhoons.

 

Answer by hehehahapoopoopa
Submitted on 3/8/2005
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errrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr they form to kill

 

Answer by mal
Submitted on 5/9/2005
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i think this website is 4 nerds who have nothing better 2 do.

 

Answer by dcfghjygtthjktfghjd
Submitted on 5/17/2005
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77777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777741sdfvbnmxscvbn edfgjk.

 

Answer by I luv rudi
Submitted on 5/21/2005
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A Cyclone begins when a warm, wet mass of air over the sea begins to rise quickly. Then combined actions of air, water and heat may then produce a huge, spinning system of clouds, rain and wind- a cyclone. The center, or eye, of a cycloneis calm. It is a hole in a dough-nut of wind. It forms and builds strength over warm sea water of at least 26.5c. It loses energy as it moves over cooler sea water or land. Here is a better picture.

 

Answer by hello
Submitted on 5/24/2005
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i like soda

 

Answer by bob
Submitted on 6/6/2005
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they form over oceans with a sea surface area over 26.5 degrees Celsis

 

Answer by Missy
Submitted on 6/20/2005
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Hurricanes form when cold and warm air get pushed together!..... And yeah!

 

Answer by My Name is Jlynn and I am 12
Submitted on 7/11/2005
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Hurricanes are mind-boggling in their size and strength. Modern technology lets us see how big hurricanes are and track them through satellite imagery, while storm-penetrating aircraft measure their strength, in terms of wind speeds and atmospheric pressure. That technology gives us detailed warnings that people a century ago never had.  

Hurricanes usually form in the tropical zones north and south of the equator, where warm waters offer ample fuel for storm formation. That's where you see convection, where warm air rises and forms clusters of thunderstorms. The Coriolis effect, created by the Earth's spinning motion, may cause this cluster of storms to rotate (counter-clockwise above the equator, or clockwise below), but the system has to be a few hundred miles from the equator for the Coriolis force to exert an effect. If the system becomes organized and strong enough, with sustained winds of 39 miles per hour, it becomes a tropical storm. At 74 miles per hour or more, it becomes a hurricane.  

A hurricane can be hundreds of miles across. It's like a big engine, with upper-level winds acting as a vent, pulling the rising warm air away from the storm. Rain bands spiral around the center of the system. Air sinks in the clear center, or eye, which can be from 5 miles to more than 100 miles across.  

Because the atmospheric pressure is so low in the eye, the water rises up there in a sort of mound. This contributes to the devastating storm surge when a hurricane hits land, but most of the surge comes from winds pushing the sea water ahead of the storm, raising ocean levels by several feet.  

When a hurricane hits land, it tends to weaken mostly because it has lost its source of energy - the warm ocean waters. Friction might slow down the surface wind, but it also can enhance turbulence and therefore gusts, scientists have found.  

The Saffir-Simpson scale is used to classify hurricanes in the United States. It was invented by engineer Herbert Saffir and former National Hurricane Center director Robert Simpson. Here's a summary:  

  

 

Answer by al3x
Submitted on 9/6/2005
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why do they form?

 

Answer by UNKOWEN
Submitted on 9/12/2005
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I don't know any thing!

 

Answer by dftih
Submitted on 9/12/2005
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i love hurricanes

 

Answer by me
Submitted on 9/15/2005
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bj yulkiu

 

Answer by DEE
Submitted on 9/27/2005
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was up

 

Answer by Jesus
Submitted on 9/27/2005
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cyclones form in the desert

 

Answer by Masroor Hasan
Submitted on 10/2/2005
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Warm water heats the air causing it to rise really quickly, then it gets pushed aside as it cools.
This pushing causes the clouds to spin.
When does it become a hurricane?
Hurricanes are tropical storms where the winds get faster than 118 km/h (73 mph).
The storms have a central area of calm known as the "eye", which is the funnel through which the warm air rises.
Overland, the storms no longer have warm water to power them and die out within a few days, but not before winds do a lot of damage.
Hurricanes generally last for about two to four weeks.  It is rare to have a hurricane last longer, because they are eventually going to hit land or cold water, where they cannot survive.  The only hurricane known to last in the Arctic for more than a day is Hurricane Erin, 2001.

Hurricanes form when warm, wet air masses over the Atlantic Ocean heat up, expand, and rise up into the sky.  Underneath the mass, a rush of wind suddenly appears to form a 'donut' shaped 'cloud'.

 

Answer by babygirl28
Submitted on 10/5/2005
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i think hurricanes form when hot,wet mass if air form over the sea begins to rise quickly.then combined water and heat produce a  huge spinning sytrm of clouds,rain and wind.

 

Answer by bre bre juans luver
Submitted on 10/11/2005
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why do hurricanes form

 

Answer by razzle
Submitted on 10/20/2005
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1.winds going in opposite directions meet over the sea where heat from the sun evaporate huge amounts of water.
2.The warm air rises and more air rushes in to take it place. It goes around and up in a spiral.
3.Gradually the winds blow faster and faster until it reaches anything between 118KPH and 320 KPH.
4. The hurricane moves westward and it is usually about 300km across.

 

Answer by no name
Submitted on 10/30/2005
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hrfkxkxgjcgh

 

Answer by krys
Submitted on 10/31/2005
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i don't know why did u ask us that

 

Answer by Aileen
Submitted on 11/2/2005
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Why is there differ names when they cyclones, typoons, hurricanes are the same?

Because they form over the Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean or Pacific Ocean and thats why they have differ  and that is why they have differ names.

 

Answer by Aileen
Submitted on 11/2/2005
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Why is there different names when they are the same?

Because they form over different oceans and that is why they have different names.

 

Answer by urmom
Submitted on 11/10/2005
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ER mom

 

Answer by bleeeeh bloooo blaaah
Submitted on 11/16/2005
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bleh bloooo blaaaaah neeeeee peeeee zeeeee deeeee mooooo naaaaaaa chaaaaaaaaaaa me naaaaaachaaaaaaaaaaa poooooooooooooooooooopacccccccccccccaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

 

Answer by Nikkers
Submitted on 12/14/2005
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When the air moves in a circular clockwise movement with latent heat and warm water colide as if you would make a tornado but with water and not a cold front

 

Answer by Hay
Submitted on 1/25/2006
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Why do hurricanes move like they do?

 

Answer by fghfd
Submitted on 2/22/2006
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gregrgregrg

 

Answer by guacamole`
Submitted on 3/15/2006
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look up hurricanes on yahoo.com

got to www.freewebs.com/itwillnotgo.
it will go just try it!!!
thanks

 

Answer by phe
Submitted on 3/22/2006
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How are cyclones formed?

Cyclones are formed when moist, hot air rises Water condenses out of it, and convection begins. If this convection develops a circulation, it can create a cyclone. This event usually happens in the doldrums.
The Coriolis, which causes circulation makes tropical cyclones rarely, form close to the equator. Areas with cold waters do not see tropical cyclones, because this prevents formation.

Tropical Cyclones derive their energy from the warm tropical oceans and do not form unless the sea-surface temperature is above 26.5C, although, once formed, they can persist over lower sea-surface temperatures. Tropical cyclones can continue for many days and may follow quite unpredictable paths.

 

Answer by sweetie
Submitted on 3/22/2006
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Hurricanes usually form in the tropical zones north and south of the equator, where warm waters offer ample fuel for storm formation. That's where you see convection, where warm air rises and forms clusters of thunderstorms. The Coriolis effect, created by the Earth's spinning motion, may cause this cluster of storms to rotate (counter-clockwise above the equator, or clockwise below), but the system has to be a few hundred miles from the equator for the Coriolis force to exert an effect. If the system becomes organized and strong enough, with sustained winds of 39 miles per hour, it becomes a tropical storm. At 74 miles per hour or more, it becomes a hurricane.


 

Answer by bearry
Submitted on 3/24/2006
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how do hurricanes form?

 

Answer by nukka
Submitted on 3/27/2006
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when the x2+7yth-6596993+86764=x7587932*8369274692358/62544839x=cyclones formation





 

Answer by holler
Submitted on 3/30/2006
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what ever

 

Answer by Dr.doolittle
Submitted on 5/14/2006
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ewgfshdbtfgnhtfcv

 

Answer by bubblyjess
Submitted on 5/30/2006
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ajklllllllllllllwwwwwwlljasdf

 

Answer by oo la la
Submitted on 11/13/2006
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WHY do hurricanes form not how but WHY?

 

Answer by smarterchild
Submitted on 1/13/2007
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i am really smart n i don't need to tell you how and why hurricanes 'cause i already know!

 

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