409. Verse


See also 236. LANGUAGE ; 249. LITERATURE .

acrosticism
the art or skill of writing a poem in which the lines or stanzas begin with letters of the alphabet in regular order or one in which the first, middle, or final letters of the line spell a word or a phrase. — acrostic, n. , adj.
Alexandrine
an iambic hexameter, or iambic verse with six feet.
anapest
a foot of three syllables, the first two short or unstressed, the third long or stressed. — anapestic, adj.
antibacchius
1. (in quantitative meter) two long syllables followed by a short.
2. (in accented meter) two stressed syllables followed by an unstressed. Cf. bacchius. — antibacchic, adj.
antistrophe
the second of two metrically related sections in a poem. Cf. strophe. See also 127. DRAMA . — antistrophic, antistrophal , adj.
arsis
the accented part of a foot of verse.
bacchius
1. (in quantitative meter) a short syllable followed by two long.
2. (in accented meter) an unstressed syllable followed by two stressed. Cf. antibacchius . — bacchic , adj.
bardism
1. the art or skill of one who composes and recites epic or heroic poetry, often to his own musical accompaniment.
2. membership in an ancient Celtic order of poets.
canto
one of the main (larger) divisions in a long poem.
catalexis
incompleteness of a foot, wherever it appears in a verse. — catalectic, adj.
dactyl
a foot of three syllables, the flrst long or accented, the following two short or unaccented. — dactylist, n. —dactylic, adj.
diastole
(in Greek and Latin verse) the lengthening of a short syllable. Cf. systole. diastolic, adj.
dipody
a double foot; a pair of similar feet comprising a metrical unit. — dipodic, adj.
distich
a couplet or pair of verses or lines, usually read as a unit.
ecthlipsis
(in Latin prosody) the elision of the last syllable of a word ending in m when the following word begins with a vowel.
heptameter
a verse having seven metrical feet. — heptametrical, adj.
heptapody
a verse having seven metrical feet; a heptameter. — heptapodic, adj.
hexameter
a verse having six metrical feet. — hexametrical, adj.
hexapody
a verse having six metrical feet; a hexameter. — hexapodous, adj.
iamb
a foot of two syllables, the first short or unstressed, the second long or stressed. — iambic, adj.
ictus
the stress or accent that indicates the rhythm of a verse or piece of music. See also 284. MUSIC .
lettrism
a technique of poetic composition originated by Isidore Isou, characterized by strange or meaningless arrangements of letters.
logaoedic
a poem or verse composed of dactyls and trochees or anapests and iambs, resulting in a proselike rhythm. — logaoedic, adj.
lyricism
the practice of writing verse in song form rather than narrative form to embody the poet’s thoughts and emotions. Also lyrism. lyricist, n. —lyrical, adj.
lyrism
lyricism. — lyrist, n.
madrigal
a lyric poem suitable for setting to music, usually with love as a theme. — madrigalist, n.
metricism
1. any of various theories and techniques of metrical composition.
2. the study of metrics. — metricist, n.
metrics
1. the science of meter. — metricist, n.
2. the art of composing metrical verse. — metrician, metrist, n.
metromania
an abnormal compulsion for writing verse.
monopody
a verse consisting of one foot. — monopodic, adj.
octonary
a stanza of eight lines; an octave. — octonary, adj.
orthometry
1. the laws of versification.
2. the art or practice of applying these laws.
pentameter
a verse of five metrical feet.
pentapody
a line of verse containing five feet.
poesy
1. Archaic. poetry.
2. Obsolete, a poem.
poetastery
poor or mediocre poetry.
poeticism
the qualities of bad poetry: trite subject matter, banal or archaic and poetical language, easy rhymes, jingling rhythms, sentimentality, etc; the standards of a poetaster.
poetics
1. Lit. Crit. the nature and laws of poetry.
2. the study of prosody.
3. a treatise on poetry.
4. ( cap. ) a treatise or collection of lecture notes on aesthetics composed by Aristotle.
proceleusmatic
a metrical foot of four short syllables. — proceleusmatic, adj.
prosody
1. the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
2. a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification, as that of Dylan Thomas. — prosodist, n. prosodie, prosodical, adj.
pyrrhic
a metrical foot composed of two short or unaccented syllables. — pyrrhic, adj.
rhapsodism
the professional recitation of epic poems. — rhapsodist, n.
rhapsodomancy
a form of divination involving verses.
rhopalism
1. the art or skill of writing verse in which each successive word in a line is longer by one syllable than the preceding word or in which each line of verse is longer by a syllable or a metrical foot than the preceding line.
2. an instanceof rhopalicform. — rhopalist, n. rhopalic, adj.
rhymester
a poetaster or poet of little worth; a mere versifier.
scansion
the analysis of verse into its metrical or rhythmic components.
spondee
a foot of two syllables, both long or stressed. — spondiac, adj.
stanza
a section of a poem containing a number of verses.
stich
a line of a poem; verse.
stichomancy
a form of divination involving lines of poetry or passages from books.
strophe
the first of two metrically related sections in a poem. Cf. antistrophe. See also 127. DRAMA .
synonymous parallelism
a term describing a couplet in which the second line repeats the idea or content of the first line, but in different terms, as by using different images, symbols, etc.
systole
the shortening of a syllable that is naturally long. Cf. diastole . — systolic, adj.
tetrameter
1. a verse of four feet.
2. Classical Prosody. a verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter. — tetrameter, adj.
tetrapody
a verse of other measure having four metrical feet.
triadism
the composition of poetic triads. — triadist, n.
tribrach
a foot composed of three short syllables. — tribrachic, adj.
trimeter
a verse having three metrical units.
triplet
1. a stanza of three verses.
2. any set of three verses. See also 284. MUSIC ; 295. NUMBERS .
tripody
a verse or measure of three metrical feet.
tristich
a poem, strophe, or stanza of three lines. — tristichic, adj.
trochee
a foot of two syllables, the first long or stressed, the second short or unstressed. — trochaic, adj.
truncation
the omission of one or more unaccented syllables at the beginning or end of a verse. — truncated, adj.

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