Tonsillitis - Description






The tonsils normally help prevent infections in two ways. They act like filters to trap bacteria, viruses, and other materials that enter the body through the mouth and sinuses. They also produce antibodies to help fight off infections. An antibody is a chemical produced by blood cells to fight off specific kinds of foreign bodies, such as bacteria and viruses.

While a person can get tonsillitis at any age, the infection occurs most commonly among children between the ages of five and ten years.

Antibiotic:
A substance derived from bacteria or other organisms that fights the growth of other bacteria or organisms.
Lymph nodes:
Small round or oval bodies within the immune system. Lymph nodes provide materials that fight disease and help remove bacteria and other foreign material from the body.
Tonsillectomy:
A surgical procedure to remove the tonsils.
Tonsils:
Oval-shaped masses of lymph gland tissue located on both sides of the back of the throat.

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