Search the FAQ Archives

3 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M
N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z
faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives

FAQ: Air Traveler's Handbook 2/4 [Monthly posting]
Section - [2-12] Airports Monopolized by One Carrier

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Single Page )
[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index | Property taxes ]


Top Document: FAQ: Air Traveler's Handbook 2/4 [Monthly posting]
Previous Document: [2-11] Getting There Faster
Next Document: [2-13] Hub Cities
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge

If you live in a hub city, where the airport is monopolized by a
single carrier, you can usually get nonstop service to most
destinations. Unfortunately, you'll probably also be paying
exorbitant prices for that service. Airlines only provide good prices
for competitive markets -- those serviced by multiple carriers. If
they are the main carrier in a given market, they keep the prices
high, and will even (arrogantly) refuse to match prices with other
carriers. 

The other national carriers might have one or two gates at this
airport. If so, you may find them offering cheaper fares than the
monopoly carrier. There is, however, one drawback to this. Since your
airport isn't one of their hubs, the flights they offer will almost
always involve first flying you to their closest hub, and getting a
connection there -- even if their hub is in the opposite direction
from your destination. On the other hand, if their hub is your
ultimate destination, then you're in luck. 

There is another workaround to dealing with a hub carrier. If there's
another major airport within an hour or two drive from your home, you
could fly out from there. (The same thing is true of using frequent
flyer certificates for free travel. If there's no seats available on
the days you're interested in from your local airport, try another
airport nearby. Also, sometimes regular air fares may be cheaper out
of an airport in a different city. If driving 100 miles saves you
$300, isn't it worth the bother?)

User Contributions:

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA




Top Document: FAQ: Air Traveler's Handbook 2/4 [Monthly posting]
Previous Document: [2-11] Getting There Faster
Next Document: [2-13] Hub Cities

Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Single Page

[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index ]

Send corrections/additions to the FAQ Maintainer:
mkant@cs.cmu.edu





Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM