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Sci.chem FAQ - Part 4 of 7
Section - 17. Preparation of chemicals

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Top Document: Sci.chem FAQ - Part 4 of 7
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17.1  Where do I find laboratory-scale procedures for organics?

The best introductory handbooks are practical textbooks, eg "Organic" Vogel 
and "EPOC" Vogel. They provide a diverse range of experiments that soon help 
develop synthetic skills. If you master the preparations in Vogel you are 
at the stage where you can start to obtain papers from organic chemistry
journals and reproduce their syntheses. There are also several texts that
discuss techniques for purifying laboratory chemicals, eg [1] The parameters 
of common specialist synthetic procedures usually are fully described in 
specialist texts that will only normally be available in chemistry department 
libraries ( eg Palladium Reagents in Organic Syntheses [2]). Most educational 
institutions will have a structured laboratory programme to develop skills.

17.2  Where do I find laboratory-scale procedures for inorganics? 

Most synthetic chemistry of inorganics appears to be devoted more to complex 
organometallics, superacids and superconductors than common inorganics, but 
it is worth considering that, of the top fifteen industrial chemicals 
produced, the only organic compounds are ethylene, propylene, ethylene 
dichloride and urea. There are specialist texts available that describe how 
to purify inorganic laboratory reagents, eg [1]. I expect some inorganic 
chemists to berate me for not knowing the standard inorganic synthesis 
textbooks. ;-) 

17.3  Where do I find industrial chemical process details? 

The standard text for common processes remains Shreve, and I must admit that 
I enjoy reading the 1945 first edition to obtain a good overview of an
industry. McKetta provides excellent process design details, along with
comparisons of various processes. Kirk Othmer provides an excellent update 
on the various processes and chemicals used extensively today. Kirk Othmer
remains the first port of call, but Ullmann is a close second. Both of these
provide extensive references to more specific texts.
 
Industry journals, eg Hydrocarbon Processing, offer annual reviews of the 
processes used in their industry. Patent literature has to be treated 
cautiously, as it is not always immediately obvious which patents detail 
actual viable processes. Chemical engineering texts, eg Perry, provide 
comprehensive detail of the equipment and operational parameters.   

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Top Document: Sci.chem FAQ - Part 4 of 7
Previous Document: 16. Laboratory Procedures
Next Document: 18. Sensory properties of chemicals

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM