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Ferret FAQ [5/5] - Medical Overview
Section - (11.2.4) Neoplasia (Cancer)

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by Dr. Susan Brown, DVM

Each of these four cancers has its own FAQ; see section [1.1].

A. Lymphosarcoma

       This is a disease of the lymphatic system of the body which is
   an important part of the immune system.  The cause is unknown but
   investigation is being done to determine if there is a virus
   involved.  It can occur in ferrets of any age.
       Signs are very variable, and many animals show no outward signs
   until they are very ill, or changes are picked up on a routine
   veterinary exam.  Changes may include enlarged lymph nodes anywhere
   in or on the body, a greatly enlarged spleen, wasting, difficulty
   breathing, and extreme lethargy.  A complete blood cell count may
   indicate abnormal (cancerous) cells present, although this occurs
   in a very small percentage of cases.
       Diagnosis is generally by biopsy of a lymph node, spleen or
   fluid from the chest.
       Treatment is by chemotherapy of the animal fulfills certain
   criteria that would make it a good candidate, Chemotherapy has been
   successful in about 75% of our cases, allowing life to be prolonged
   in a quality way for 6 months to 2 years.  

B. Insulinoma

       This is a tumor of the pancreas leading to a high insulin
   production and a low blood sugar.

C. Adrenal Adenoma or Adenocarcinoma

       This is a tumor of the adrenal gland.

D. Skin tumors

       There are a variety of skin tumors occurring in the pet ferret.
   The most common are sebaceous gland adenomas, and mast cell tumors.
   Most of these should be removed particularly if they are ulcerated,
   bleeding, or have a rough surface.
        Chondromas occur with some frequency on the tip of the tail as
   a hard round lump.  They are generally benign, but may become large
   and bothersome and can easily be removed.

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12. *** General medical information *** 

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Top Document: Ferret FAQ [5/5] - Medical Overview
Previous Document: (11.2.3) Infectious diseases
Next Document: (12.1) Do I need to worry about toxoplasmosis?

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM