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Ferret FAQ [3/5] - Training and Behavior
Section - (8.8) Do ferrets travel well?

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Top Document: Ferret FAQ [3/5] - Training and Behavior
Previous Document: (8.7) What else should I probably not worry about?
Next Document: (8.9) Help! My ferret is lost!
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
In general, yes.

Around town
  Ferrets love going places.  You can fix up a shoulder bag with a
  litter pan and space for a water bottle and food dish and carry them
  with you wherever they're welcome.  Be careful not to let them get
  too hot [10.8] or cold, though.

Automobile travel
  Car trips don't seem to bother ferrets, although being closed up in
  a travel cage may irritate them -- and you, if they scratch to get
  out.  Keeping them loose in the car is not recommended, since they
  could get under the driver's feet or through some undetected hole
  into the engine compartment or onto the road.  You can use a water
  bottle in a car, but fasten a deep dish or cup underneath it, since
  it will drip, and put down a towel to soak up the inevitable spills.

Airplane travel
  Only a few airlines allow ferrets on board their planes, in
  under-seat carriers, for an additional charge.  (America West, Air
  Canada, and Delta do, and I once got a special exception from
  Continental after talking with their customer service folks for a
  while.  Any others?)  Sending your ferret in the cargo area is not
  generally recommended, largely due to problems people have had with
  temperature, pressure and general handling of pets who travel this
  way.  If you make any travel arrangements for your ferrets, whether
  it's in the cabin, as baggage, or as freight, get them in writing.
  Several people have reported experiences in which one person at an
  airline said ferrets would be fine only to have another person
  prohibit them, sometimes on very short notice.

  Tranquilizing the ferret isn't recommended -- it'll disorient him
  and may affect his ability to keep his body temperature regulated.
  Medications can also be affected by altitude, leading to a risk of
  overdosing.

  Several people have been able to sneak their ferrets aboard aircraft
  by carrying them through security, then transferring them to a
  duffel bag in a restroom, but I have no experience with that.

   If you have to fly your ferrets somewhere and no airline will take
   them, a courier service such as Airborne Express or FedEx might be
   able to help.  This might be the only way to fly your ferrets to
   some international destinations.

Hotels
  Many hotels allow pets in cages, although it's a good idea to
  call ahead and make sure.  Also leave a note to reassure the maids.

Canada/U.S. border crossings
  As of January 22, 1997, an import permit is no longer needed to
  bring a ferret into Canada, whether it's a Canadian or U.S. ferret.
  Ferrets are now treated like dogs and cats, and only require proof
  of rabies and distemper vaccinations.  However, if you do not have a
  residential address in Canada, a quarantine period may be imposed,
  apparently at the discretion of the agent at the border.

  Bringing ferrets from Canada into the U.S. is much the same.  All I've
  ever needed was a rabies certificate.  Proof that the ferrets came
  from the U.S. in the first place might also be helpful (a NY state
  license, in my case; if you don't have one, register your pets with
  U.S. Customs before you enter Canada).  I don't know much about
  Canadian residents bringing ferrets into the U.S., but I wouldn't
  expect it to be any different.

Legal issues
  You should also check with the Wildlife Departments of any areas
  you'll be passing through or staying in to make sure that ferrets
  are allowed, and carry documentation of the vaccines your pets have
  had, just in case.

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Top Document: Ferret FAQ [3/5] - Training and Behavior
Previous Document: (8.7) What else should I probably not worry about?
Next Document: (8.9) Help! My ferret is lost!

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:12 PM