Search the FAQ Archives

3 - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M
N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z
faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives

FAQ: Soc.Culture.Native


[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index | Business Photos and Profiles ]
[Below is verbatim the last edit by Michael Wilson of the
soc.culture.native/alt.native FAQ.]

See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
From: "Michael" <nakni@corecomm.net.nospam>
Subject: FAQ: Soc.Culture.Native
Message-ID: <M35n4.1817$WB5.77303@news.corecomm.net>
Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2000 20:35:23 -0600
Archive-name: soc.culture.native-faq
Original-author: idoy@crux2.cit.cornell.edu (Michael Wilson)
Current-author: mwilson@uwm.edu (M. Wilson)
Comment: enhanced & edited until from 3/1/93 to 2/5/96 by M. Wilson
Comment: enhanced & edited from 2/5/96 to 2/21/97 by T. E. Brunner

This FAQ and a copy of the charter is available at
http://chahta.niti.net/~mwilson/scn

As always, comments, corrections, and especially additions
to the FAQ are welcome and appreciated.
===========================================================
Frequently Submitted/Asked Items

This document, often referred to as the FAQ (the Frequently Asked Questions
file) discusses some questions and topics that occur repeatedly on
soc.culture.native and alt.native. Often submitted by new users of this
group, these questions may involve discussions sufficiently hashed and
re-hashed on one or both of soc.culture.native and alt.native, questions
which may then be quickly answered with reference to this document, or
questions which may encroach upon certain sensitive areas. If there is a
question and answer which you find questionable, please let the poster know
(whose name is included with the question and answer, unless it's me).


Contents
========
1. What is the purpose of these newsgroups?
2. What is the history of this newsgroup?
3. Why are there two American Indian newsgroups: soc.culture.native and
alt.native?
4. Shouldn''t you call yourself a "Native American"?
5. My Indian heritage is sketchy. Can I express my opinions on this
newsgroup?
6. Is this newsgroup only for North American native people?
7. If this newsgroup is for all native people, isn't there overlap between,
say, African newsgroups and this newsgroup?
8. Are there Native American listservs I can subscribe to?
9. What is the relationship between the listserv NativeNet and the USENET
newsgroups soc.culture.native and alt.native?
10. Outdated gopher information DELETED.
11. Where can I get Native American music?
12. My great-grandmother is an Indian princess.
13. What's the story on New Agers and Shamanism?
14. Where can I get a list of all university Native American Program in the
United States?
15. I want to read some Native American Literature. Which books should I
read?
16. What's the deal with Forrest Carter, author of _The Education of Little
Tree_?
17. Wasn't there a Native American rock band in the early seventies?
18. Is there a list of Native American Bulletin Board Systems (BBSes)?
19. Are there any American Indian World Wide Web site available?
20. How can I get Indigenous (Americas) language learning materials?
21. What is a twinkie and how do I know if I am one?

Questions and Answers
=====================
1. What is the purpose of this newsgroup? (mwilson@csd.uwm.edu) The Charter
states: "Soc.culture.native is for the discussion of issues relating to
native populations throughout the world. . . . This newsgroup is intended to
be inclusive, not exclusive, offering an important vehicle for exchange
among native peoples and between native and non-native peoples. Besides
providing a forum for the discussion of such issues as sovereignty,
religion, education and philosophy, this newsgroup will also carry news
stories and bulletins which pertain to current events relating to indigenous
peoples, and which alert readers to urgent situations which require
immediate responses, such as human rights cases and imminent encroachment
upon native populations."


2. What is the history of this newsgroup? (mwilson@csd.uwm.edu) The group
was a difficult sell to the folks at news.groups. In fact, an attempt to
create a newsgroup for American Indians actually failed the first time
around back in 1992 because of irregular voting. We studied the different
histories sent to us by persons wishing to see this group become a reality.
Especially difficult was the question of a name. Soc.culture.american.indian
or soc.culture.indian.american for this group did not sit well with persons
of East Indian descent living in the US. The name
soc.culture.native.american was rejected by those born in the US or the
Americans arguing that they were now "native" to this hemisphere. As a
compromise, we settled on soc.culture.native. Several UseNet Vets also
helped out, giving us some great advice about how to create this newsgroup.
Although we made some incredibly bone-headed mistakes, we somehow managed to
get the job done. The tough discussions went from December 1992 to the end
of January 1993. There were three major proponents of the group: me, Floyd
Davidson, and Gary Trujillo. The vote ran through February (the votes were
collected and counted by Jan Isley). The group began operations of March 1,
1993.

3. Why are there two American Indian newsgroups: soc.culture.native and
alt.native? (mwilson@csd.uwm.edu) When I first proposed this newsgroup, a
lot of news servers, including my own at Cornell, did not carry the alt.*
newsgroups. As a result, many of us were being left out of the conversation.
I was told that a soc.* newsgroup would likely be carried by just about all
news servers, and thus would provide us with at least one universal channel
of communications. As time went on, both alt.native and soc.culture.native
became pretty much carried by all news servers. It''s sometimes a little
awkward, but crossposting between the two groups is the best policy.

4. Shouldn't you call yourself a "Native American"? (mwilson@csd.uwmu) I
refer you to Adrian C. Louis' novel _Skins_."He'd never met a ''Native
American'' before. He'd met Indians, skins, dog eaters, sheep f******s,
rabbit-chokers, Apaches, Arapahoes, Cheyennes, Crows, Shoshones, Comanches,
and several tough son of a bitch Paiutes, but he''d never met a skin who
called himself a 'Native American'." (247)

5. My Indian heritage is sketchy. Can I still express my opinions on this
newsgroup? (mwilson@csd.uwm.edu) This newsgroup was designed with the idea
that it would provide a place where people -- native and non-Native -- can
meet and talk about native issues. So you don't need to any native ancestry
to use this newsgroup, but it doesn't hurt.

6. Is this newsgroup only for North American native people? Not at all. This
newsgroup is for native people in all parts of the world -- North and South
America, Malaysia, and so on. It has a greater emphasis on North American
native people only because of the availability of technology.

7. If this newsgroup is for all native people, isn't there overlap between,
say, African newsgroups and this newsgroup? Yes, and for this reason, we
hope that people will cross-post when these issues impact areas which will
be of use or interest to other native peoples.

8. Are there Native American listservs I can subscribe to?
(brunner@think.com) Yes, there are mailing lists to which you might have
access: AISESNET, NATIVEPROFS, and NATIVELIT (part I), NATIVE-L, NATCHAT,
NAT-1492, NAT-EDU, NAT-HLTH, NAT-LANG (part II), TRIBALLAW (part III).
OTHERS (part IV)

Part I:
AISNET INFORMATION:
AISESnet: Distributed by the University of Montana, Missoula, Montana;
Moderator/Listowner: Borries Demeler (demeler@selway.umt.edu); List for the
American Indian Science and Engineering Society Description: AISESnet is an
informal distribution list providing communication between and information
for AISES chapters, high school students, and members of industry. The
list's topics include AISES issues, Native American issues, engineering and
science issues, public opinion, position openings, AISES events, and chapter
newsletters, scholarship information, conference information and discussion.
AISESnet membership is open to all, including non - AISES members. There is
no subscription fee. The list is divided into three sub- groups, 'general',
'discussion', and 'alcohol & drug'. To subscribe, send an informal
subscription request to: aisesnet@selway.umt.eduFor more information, mail
to the listowner (demeler@selway.umt.edu)

NATIVEPROFS-L INFORMATION:
NATIVEPROFS-L is a listserv for and about the American Indian and Alaska
Native Professoriate. This listserv was created in response to a need for
continual communication among native professors, expressed at the annual
conference for the American Indian and Alaska Native Professoriate in 1993
(sponsored by Arizona State University). Persons using this listserv will be
members of this organization or who will eventually be members of this
organization. This listserv is not intended for use by the general public.
If you have any questions about NATIVEPROFS-L, please contact Mike Wilson at
mwilson@csd.uwm.edu

Part II:
NativeNet - INFORMATION: The NativeNet lists are all oriented toward
providing channels of communication for exchanging information and ideas
about the indigenous peoples of the world. Though many of the subscribers to
the lists are themselves members of indigenous (aboriginal/Native)
societies, NativeNet exists to promote dialogue between Native and
non-Native peoples, so it does not pretend to be "of by and for" indigenous
peoples. Since late 1989, the NativeNet lists have served to promote
communication and understanding among people all over the planet relative to
the First Peoples of the world and their many cultures. The NATIVE-L list is
for posting informational articles and questions. It should not be used for
carrying on discussions, since the NATCHAT list has been established
specifically for that purpose. NAT-LANG is for information and discussion of
the languages of aboriginal peoples, NAT-EDU is for educational matters,
NAT-HLTH is for health issues, and NAT-1492 (now largely dormant) is for
articles pertaining to the 500th anniversary of the "voyage of discovery" of
Christopher Columbus (from the perspective of aboriginal peoples).
Articles from NATIVE-L are automatically forwarded to the "alt.native" and
"soc.culture.native" newsgroups, so if you want to continue reading either
of these newsgroups, you would be best advised *not* to subscribe to
NATIVE-L, since you will have access to all of the traffic on that list via
Usenet. All of the NativeNet lists are "moderated" in the Usenet sense,
meaning that all articles are reviewed by a moderator prior to being relayed
to the lists to which they have been sent. The moderator checks each article
for its relevance to the topic of the list, and ensures that a modicum of
good taste is maintained (relative to his or her own subjective judgement,
of course), and deals with misdirected articles (containing clearly personal
correspondence, intended for the author of a previous article [see below] or
an administrative query). To subscribe to any of the NativeNet lists, go to
the NativeNet Web page at "http://www.fdl.cc.mn.us/natnet/" where you will
find an electronic form you can fill out, or send email to the listserv
address:  listserv@tamu.edu In the body of your message, put: subscribe
"listname" your_full_name where "listname" is replaced by the name of one of
the lists - for example: subscribe nat-edu Jane Doe At least a first and
last name, separated by a space, are required. You can include any number of
"subscribe" lines within a single message. There are archives for all but
the NATCHAT mailing list. Articles can be retrieved from these archives via
full-text Boolean search expressions.

For more details on this feature, send a message to
"listserv@tamu.edu"
containing: get nn-intro archives native-l

Some archives are also available via the NativeNet Web site (see
above).

Part III:
TRIBALLAW - INFORMATION: Tribal Law is an open forum that will enable
interaction by native people and others interested in the laws and policy
that effect Native Americans on the North American continent. Students,
teachers and professionals, as well as anyone else interested in the subject
matter, may post and discuss legal and policy issues regarding recent
tribal, state and federal court decisions, Indian public policy, social
services and the legal history of Native Americans within the United States
and Canada. It is our hope that through this forum people may become better


informed and will also be able to use the list for research and discussion
as well as for posting their tribe's recent tribal court decisions for
discussion and analysis. Please feel free to post and respond as you see
fit. We ask only that everyone be respectful to others in your replies.
Although this is an unmoderated list, the listowners reserve the right to
terminate any membership if we find that they are abusing other members and
their rights to speak openly on this list. Below are instructions for
subscribing and unsubscribing, as well as how to access the archives and
other commands. If you have any questions about Tribal Law, or have any
suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact one or both of the list
owners. To subscribe to the triballaw mailing list send email To:
listserv@thecity.sfsu.edu In the body of the mail (not the subject line,
which can be left blank) write the following: subscribe triballaw
<your_name>

Part IV:
OTHERS
AZTLAN
Precolumbian Mesoamerican studies -- send message "subscribe aztlan
your-first-name your-last-name" to listserv@ulkyvm.louisville.edu
IROQUOIS
Iroquois language -- send message "subscribe iroquois your-first-name
your-last-name" to listserv@vm.utcc.utoronto.ca
NAGPRA-L
Discussion of Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation
Act -- send message "subscribe nagpra-l" to majordomo@world.std.com
NAT-WORK
Native American work issues -- send message "subscribe nat-work
your-first-name your-last-name" to listserv@akronvm.uakron.edu
NATFOOD-L
Native American Foods -- send message "subscribe natfood-l
your-first-name
your-last-name" to listproc@listproc.wsu.edu

9. What is the relationship between the listserv NativeNet and the UseNet
newsgroup soc.culture.native? A number of selected posts from the large
mailing lists of NativeNet appear regularly on soc.culture.native and
alt.native. However, at this time, the gateway is not two-way. If you wish
to have the person who wrote the post from NativeNet see your reply, you
will need to send your post to him or her through e-mail. The post from the
mailing list Native-L will have this designation at the top of the post.

10. DELETED

11. Where can I get Native American music? (Greg Jerrett,
jerrett@iastate.edu)
You can write to: Indian House, P.O. Box 472, Taos, NM 87571, If you write
to this address and ask for a catalog (be sure to include your address!)
they will send one promptly. Everything is $10 and everything is available
on a cassette but no cd's. The recording are mostly live so no point in cd
really. They are VERY quick. The formats are usually collections of types of
music, e.g., Lakota love songs by Kevin Locke, or the Red Earth Singers Live
at Bismark or Crow grass dance and owl dance songs. Usually you get 10 or
more gourd songs or peyote songs, that sort of thing.

(Eric Brunner, brunner@cup.hp.com)
A new publication is also avaliable, and highly recommended.
A Guide to native American Music Recordings
Greg Gombert, 1994
ISBN 0-9644454-3-3
$12.95
> From the back cover blurb:
1,300 recordings, 90 record companies and 30 distributors are listed in a
through and easy to use format with a comprehensive index. Cross- over
styles such as blues, AAA, country, new age, rock and rap are covered as
completeley as traditional and intertribal styles.


You can write to: Indian House, P.O. Box 472, Taos, NM 87571, If you write
to this address and ask for a catalog (be sure to include your address!)
they will send one promptly. Everything is $10 and everything is available
on a cassette but no cd's. The recording are mostly live so no point in cd
really. They are VERY quick. The formats are usually collections of types of
music, e.g., Lakota love songs by Kevin Locke, or the Red Earth Singers Live
at Bismark or Crow grass dance and owl dance songs. Usually you get 10 or
more gourd songs or peyote songs, that sort of thing.

12. My great-grandmother is an Indian princess. (mwilson@csd.uwm.edu) Then
you should consider the following statement by Vine Deloria: "It doesn't
take much insight into racial attitudes to understand the real meaning of
the Indian-grandmother complex that plagues certain whites. A male ancestor
has too much of the aura of the savage warrior, the unknown primitive, the
instinctive animal, to make him a respectable member of the family tree. But
a young Indian princess? Ah, there was royalty for the taking. Somehow the
white was linked with a noble house of gentility and culture if his
grandmother was an Indian princess who ran away with an intrepid pioneer.
And royalty has always been an unconscious but all-consuming goal of the
European immigrant" (_Custer Died for Your Sins_ 3).


13. What's the story on New Agers and Shamanism? (brunner@think.com)
I'm working on a suitable response to this one, my nickle story is: The word
"shamanism" comes to the world from anthropological work done in East
Siberia. It entered the anthropological literature as a general term in
about the early 1900's as a "shorthand" for a wide variety of spiritual and
social practices. Modernly it refers to several different types of
"shamanism", see newsgroup soc.religion.shamanism, particularly its FAQ for
more. The word "new age" is a recent pan-Euro-American creation, it doesn't
appear to have any core tenets as a belief system, except glibly imitating
predominantly Lakota-stolen external forms of faith expression, and other
trinketized objects, such as (Anishabe) dreamcatchers and so forth. There is
a "Lakota Declaration of War" of recent date which, IMO, speaks to the
central issues of cultural appropriation by the current batch of "new
agers". Personally, I think it worth knowing that these post-60's air-heads
are simply a new twist on the turn of the century American Primativists. Now
the targets are Lakota, then they were Eastern Tribes, and I see them in the
context of European Primitivist Movements, of which Blye's drum banging is
simply the most recent incantation. Again, a better answer may be
forthcomming. Less biased perhaps <g>.

14. Where can I get a list of all university Native American Programs in the
United States and/or Canada? (brunner@think.com)

There is work in progress on this question, by Amy Davidson and Robert
Nelson ASAIL Editorial Assistant and Professor of English, resp. at the
University of Richmond. A gathering of University/College programs from some
years ago is available. The bibliographical entry for that is: Ballinger,
Franchot, ed. "A Guide to Native American Studies Programs in the United
States." <SAIL [Studies in American Indian Literatures]> 5.supplement
(1995): 1-31.

Franchot's info is based on responses to a 1992 questionnaire he sent out.
Only 30 schools provided responses, though. Amy and Robert are busy rooting
out more info including Canadian coverage. If you know of any programs other
than the ones listed below, please contact Amy or Robert directly, their
email address are: davidsona@urvax.urich.edu and nelson@urvax.urich.edu. The
list of already cooperating schools is:
Cornell University
De Anza College
Five College consortium (Smith, Amherst, U Mass, Hampshire, Mt
Holyoke)
Humboldt State University
Iowa State University
Pembroke State University
SUNY - Oswego
Trent University
University of Arizona
University of Iowa
University of Lethbridge
University of Washington
University of Wyoming

15. I want to read some Native American Literature. Which books should I
read?
(mwilson@csd.uwm.edu)
There are many, many wonderful American Indian writers today. A
good starting list may be found at

http://www.uwm.edu/~mwilson/lit/booklist.htm

This list was put together by the members of the NativeLit-L mailing list
for Native literature.

16. What's the deal with Forrest Carter, author of _The Education of
Little Tree_? (mwilson@csd.uwm.edu)
The last I heard, a professor of history (also named Carter, I believe)
argued that Forrest Carter was none other than Asa Carter, former Klu Klux
Klans member and speechwriter for George Wallace ("segregation forever").
The _New York Times_ showed pictures of the two, and I have to say they
looked like the same guy.

Tony Plate (tap@cs.toronto.edu) writes: 12 years after the death of Forrest
Carter, his widow, India Carter, confirmed that he was indeed Asa Carter.
This was reported in the October 25, 1991 edition of Publishers Weekly. The
article quotes from a number of people connected to the issue, whose views
range from the (seemingly) hostile to the understanding: "_The Education of
Little Tree_" is a hoax ... the last fantasy of a man who reinvented himself
again again in the 30 years that preceeded his death in 1979" Dan T. Carter,
professor of history at Emory University, a biographer of George Wallace,
and author of several stories exposing Forrest Carter's past. "If the man
who wrote speeches for George Wallace could write this book there's hope for
a cure for the souls of us all." Rennard Strickland, Cherokee, Director of
the center for the study of American Indian Law and Policy at the University
of Oklahoma, and writer of the introduction to the UNMP edition. According
to Professor Carter, Asa Carter was one-eighth Indian and was not an orphan.
Eleanor Friede, Forrest's editor, said that his grand parents were Cherokee.
Forrest always denied to her that he was Asa Carter and she was shocked when
told the truth by Forrest's reclusive widow. The Publishers Weekly article
is the best I have found on this subject. It refers to several articles in
the New York Times, one in 1976, and another in the Oct. 4'th issue
(presumably 1991). There is a one or two sentence reference to the story in
"The imaginary Indian: the image of the Indian in Canadian culture." (Daniel
Francis. Arsenal Pulp Press, c1992.)

17. Wasn't there a Native American rock band in the early seventies?
Yes, it was called Redbone.

Steve Brock (sbrock@teal.csn.org) writes:
Redbone's top-40 hit was called "Come and Get Your Love."

Eric Brunner (brunner@cup.hp.com) adds:
Redbone is based in LA and played at the 1994 Matsun (San Juan
Baptista) gathering.

18. Is there a list of Native American BBSes?
The absolute latest version of this list is also always
available on the BDPA BAC BBS(1-707-552-3314) and on the
Data Bits Online BBS(1-213-295-6094) in the following file:
NATIVBBS.MSG = BBS List
(c)1993 Arthur R. McGee & The Indigenous Peoples of North America


19. Are there any American Indian World Wide Web site available?
(mwilson@csd.uwm.edu)
There are many, many Web sites available. Rather than try to list them all
in the FAQ, we will try instead to list sites that have good indexes.

Lisa Mitten's list of sites:
http://info.pitt.edu/~lmitten/indians.html

Capucine's Native Resources:
http://www.klingon.org/native/pages/index.html

Please send me other great sites.

20. How can I get Indigenous (Americas) language learning materials?
> From <silver@sonoma.edu>:

To: Mailing List: NAT-LANG (nat-lang@gnosys.svle.ma.us)
To whom it may concern: if you are looking for teaching materials and tapes
for American Indian languages, The Newsletter of the Society for the Study
of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (aka SSILA News- letter) has a
column entitled LEARNING AIDS, which provides information about published
and "semi-published" teaching materials and tapes. The Newsletter is
published quarterly. If interested contact the editor: Victor Golla,
Department of Ethnic Studies, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521
(internet: vkgl@axe.humboldt.edu.>.

21. What is a twinkie and how do I know if I am one? (Gary "Beau" Owen
fcowboy@netgsi.com) writes:

You might be interested in my humorous posting 'You Might Be a Twinkie
If...' in which I catalogue all the horrors I have personally seen committed
by New Agers and wannabes.

http://www.netgsi.com/~fcowboy/twinkie.html
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Michael Wilson, mwilson@uwm.edu, Department of English, The University of
Wisconsin - Milwaukee

   ##############  end of FAQ file ##############

-- 
Floyd L. Davidson                          floyd@barrow.com
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)

User Contributions:

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA


[ Usenet FAQs | Web FAQs | Documents | RFC Index ]

Send corrections/additions to the FAQ Maintainer:
Floyd Davidson <floyd@ptialaska.net>





Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM