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rec.aviation.military Frequently Asked Questions (part 1 of 5)
Section - B.6. JAST

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The US Joint Advanced Strike Technology programme, established in early
1994, is intended to be a technology development programme rather than an
actual service aircraft.  It involves all the improvements that would be
expected for a next generation aircraft (advanced materials, stealth,
reduced costs, better systems integration, and so forth), plus two
particularly innovative concepts.  The first is the idea of a modular
aircraft design, so that individual aircraft could be built with different
combinations of components for different services and missions (take-off
capability, for example -- the same basic airframe could be built in
conventional runway versions for the USAF, carrier-borne versions for the
USN, and V/STOL versions for the USMC).  The second is the possibility of
providing a "virtual reality" environment for the pilot, which would
integrate tactical information with the outside view.

JAST has inherited much of the defunct A/F-X project, and has been
partially combined with ARPA's X-32 project (see section B.14).  This was
resisted by the DOD, which wanted JAST to be a relatively low-risk project.

Twelve technology development contracts were awarded in May 1994, the
largest going to Boeing.  The JAST project is expected to lead to the
construction of two technology demonstrator aircraft (one will probably be
the X-32), and eventually to a service aircraft (which may or may not be
derived from one of the demonstrators) which will begin to replace the F-16
in USAF service, the F/A-18 (and possibly F-14) in USN service, and the
Harrier in USMC service by 2010.

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Top Document: rec.aviation.military Frequently Asked Questions (part 1 of 5)
Previous Document: B.5. Eurofighter 2000
Next Document: B.7. LCA

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