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Hedgehog FAQ [4/7] - Hedgehogs as pets
Section - <6.7> HELP, my hedgehog is LOST! (or Hedgehog Hide-and-Seek).

( Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Single Page )
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Top Document: Hedgehog FAQ [4/7] - Hedgehogs as pets
Previous Document: <6.6> Biting and nipping
See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
Don't panic.  Here are some tips for finding a lost hedgie.

Hedgehog are experts at hide-and-seek.  They like to sleep under pieces of
clothing, in jacket sleeves, pants legs, etc.  They may even crawl into a
sock (and get stuck)!  Don't move heavy objects that might injure a hiding
hedgehog.  Check furniture before sitting on it -- especially sofabeds.  Many
wall units, bookcases, and even built-in cabinets have a hollow base.  The
back of the unit may allow access to the base.  This is a favorite hedgie
hiding place.

If your hedgehog makes a huffing/hissing noise when he is disturbed, you can
use this to your advantage.  Carefully disturb potential hiding places and
listen for a huff.  Knock on the base of furniture and cabinets, holding your
ear to the base to listen for a startle response.  Repeat several times. One
escaped hedgehog was found inside a stereo speaker because he huffed when his
owner walked by (luckily, before he was blasted by loud music)!  If you find
your hedgehog in a difficult place you may opt to wait for him to come out on
his own, rather than risk injuring him (or your back!).  Blowing the scent of
his favorite treat into the hiding place may help lure him out, but only if
he's calm and ready, and, most importantly, warm enough to function.

If you cannot find your hedgehog, or need to wait for him to voluntarily
leave his hiding place, consider whether he might get cold.  If he could be
in an underheated place (e.g. near an outside wall, on a cold floor) TURN UP
THE HEAT.  Make it downright tropical if you have to.  If he gets too cold,
he may enter into a dangerous semi-hibernation state, and will not be able to
wake up and come out. (Of course, make sure he's not hiding in heat vents or
behind radiators before you do this!)

A special thanks goes to Christine Porter for providing the entire section
above!  You'll be happy to know that Pokey, who inspired the piece, was
tracked down and safely returned to where she belongs.  I wish I could say I
can't relate to what Christine wrote, but I can attest to its accuracy.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
-- 
Brian MacNamara - macnamara@HedgehogHollow.COM
Hedgehog Hollow:  http://HedgehogHollow.COM/   
- 
Brian MacNamara - macnamara@HedgehogHollow.COM
Hedgehog Hollow:  http://HedgehogHollow.COM/   

User Contributions:

Rio
Report this comment as inappropriate
Apr 26, 2012 @ 10:22 pm
Hi, my hedgehog started running around her cage squealing so I took her out to see what was wrong. Her genital area was inflamed and she had open sores all around that area. I gave her a bath, but I'm really worried about her. Do you have any idea what this could be?
Thank you!

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Top Document: Hedgehog FAQ [4/7] - Hedgehogs as pets
Previous Document: <6.6> Biting and nipping

Part1 - Part2 - Part3 - Part4 - Part5 - Part6 - Part7 - Single Page

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM