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Electrical Wiring FAQ (Part 1 of 2)
Section - Introduction/Disclaimers

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See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge

	Although we've done a fair bit of wiring, we are not
	electricians, and we cannot be responsible for what you do.  If
	you're at all uncertain about what is correct or safe, *don't
	do it*.  Contact someone qualified -- a licensed electrician,
	or your local electrical inspector.  Electricity is no joke;
	mistakes can result in shocks, fires, or electrocution.

	Furthermore, our discussion is based on the U.S. National
	Electrical Code (NEC) and the Canadian Electrical code (CEC).
	To the best of our abilities, we have confirmed every detail
	with the electrical code, but we don't quote sections
	simply to keep this thing readable.  If you think we're wrong,
	we invite you to correct us, but please - quote references!

	The NEC and the CEC do not, in and of themselves, have the
	force of law.  Many municipalities adopt it en toto.  Others,
	however, do not.  Check your with your local building
	department (and <provincial> Hydro Inspection Offices in
	Canada) to find out what applies in your area.  Also,
	your local electrical utility may also have special requirements
	for electrical service installation.  Bear in mind, too, that
	we say here applies primarily to ordinary single-family
	residences.  Multi-family dwellings, mobile homes, commercial
	establishments, etc., are sometimes governed by different
	rules.

	Also note that, contrary to popular belief in the U.S. (and in
	some parts of Canada), Canada is not a wholly-owned subsidiary
	of the U.S.  Consequently, the NEC does not apply in Canada.
	Lots of things are the same, including voltages, line
	frequencies, and the laws of physics.  But there are a number
	of crucial differences in the regulations.  Where we can, we've
	noted them, flagging the relevant passages with ``NEC'' or
	``CEC''.

	Remember that the CEC and NEC are minimal standards.  It is often
	smart to go beyond their minimal requirements.

User Contributions:

Dev
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 21, 2011 @ 12:00 am
In a fire protection circuit, circuts are shown witha no example 6,8,4etc. what it mean?these circuits are connected between smode detector,junction box etc
kevin
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 24, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
My daughter dropped a small necklace behind her dresser. The necklace crossed a plug terminal and shorted the receptacle.
I bought a new receptacle and installed the same. I still have no power I suspect there could be a bigger problem,this is aluminum wiring.
I've killed the breaker and call an electrician but am curious as to what happened.P.s. there is a dimmer switch on the same circuit.
dennis
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 24, 2012 @ 11:11 am
Regarding new construction wiring and running 12/2 and 14/3 wire in the same box.

I have multiple switches to lights. Ran 12/2 and 14/3 into switch box and inspector wrote correction needed.

What should I have done instead?

thank you
dennis
Robert
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 26, 2012 @ 9:21 pm
Does a grounding electrode facilitate the operation of a OCPD, to clear a ground fault ?
@dennis
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 18, 2013 @ 10:10 am
Assuming you are installing two switches in a two switch box, you probably should have used 14/2 and 14/3 instead of replacing 14/2 with 12/2. If you are only installing one switch in a one switch box, you should only have one cable in the box.
P k
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 26, 2014 @ 10:10 am
I prefer to use nothing smaller than12 awg /the smallest sized wire on a circuit determines the allowable ampacity
Ex: 15 amp-14awg. 12awg-20amp only rule for thumb other factors such as continuous load,heating and others if you do not know the safe NEC rules then please call a qualified journeyman Electrician better be safe

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Top Document: Electrical Wiring FAQ (Part 1 of 2)
Previous Document: Questions answered in this FAQ
Next Document: What is the NEC? Where can I get a copy?

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM