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Electrical Wiring FAQ (Part 1 of 2)
Section - Inspections how and what? Why should I get my wiring inspected?

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Top Document: Electrical Wiring FAQ (Part 1 of 2)
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Next Document: My house doesn't meet some of these rules and regulations. Do I have to upgrade?
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	Most jurisdictions require that you obtain a permit and
	inspections of any wiring that is done.  Amongst other more
	mundane bureaucratic reasons (like insurance companies not
	liking to have to pay claims), a permit and inspections
	provides some assurance that you, your family, your neighbors
	or subsequent owners of your home don't get killed or lose
	their homes one night due to a sloppy wiring job.

	Most jurisdictions have the power to order you to vacate your
	home, or order you to tear out any wiring done without a
	permit.  California, for instance, is particularly nasty about
	this.

	If fire starts in your home, and un-inspected wiring is at
	fault, insurance companies will often refuse to pay the damage
	claims.

	In general, the process goes like this:
		- you apply to your local inspections office or building
		  department for a permit.  You should have a sketch or
		  detailed drawing of what you plan on doing.  This is
		  a good time to ask questions on any things you're not
		  sure of.  If you're doing major work, they may impose
		  special conditions on you, require loading
		  calculations and ask other questions.  At this point
		  they will tell you which inspections you will need.
		- If you're installing a main panel, you will need to
		  have the panel and service connections inspected
		  before your power utility will provide a connection.
		  This is sometimes done by the local power authority
		  rather than the usual inspectors.
		- After installing the boxes and wiring, but before
		  the insulation/walls go up, you will need a
		  "rough-in" inspection.
		- After the walls are up, and the wiring is complete,
		  you will need a "final inspection".

User Contributions:

Dev
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 21, 2011 @ 12:00 am
In a fire protection circuit, circuts are shown witha no example 6,8,4etc. what it mean?these circuits are connected between smode detector,junction box etc
kevin
Report this comment as inappropriate
Dec 24, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
My daughter dropped a small necklace behind her dresser. The necklace crossed a plug terminal and shorted the receptacle.
I bought a new receptacle and installed the same. I still have no power I suspect there could be a bigger problem,this is aluminum wiring.
I've killed the breaker and call an electrician but am curious as to what happened.P.s. there is a dimmer switch on the same circuit.
dennis
Report this comment as inappropriate
Feb 24, 2012 @ 11:11 am
Regarding new construction wiring and running 12/2 and 14/3 wire in the same box.

I have multiple switches to lights. Ran 12/2 and 14/3 into switch box and inspector wrote correction needed.

What should I have done instead?

thank you
dennis
Robert
Report this comment as inappropriate
Nov 26, 2012 @ 9:21 pm
Does a grounding electrode facilitate the operation of a OCPD, to clear a ground fault ?
@dennis
Report this comment as inappropriate
Mar 18, 2013 @ 10:10 am
Assuming you are installing two switches in a two switch box, you probably should have used 14/2 and 14/3 instead of replacing 14/2 with 12/2. If you are only installing one switch in a one switch box, you should only have one cable in the box.
P k
Report this comment as inappropriate
Jan 26, 2014 @ 10:10 am
I prefer to use nothing smaller than12 awg /the smallest sized wire on a circuit determines the allowable ampacity
Ex: 15 amp-14awg. 12awg-20amp only rule for thumb other factors such as continuous load,heating and others if you do not know the safe NEC rules then please call a qualified journeyman Electrician better be safe

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Top Document: Electrical Wiring FAQ (Part 1 of 2)
Previous Document: Other Resources on Wiring
Next Document: My house doesn't meet some of these rules and regulations. Do I have to upgrade?

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM