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diabetes FAQ: treatment (part 3 of 5)
Section - Managing adolescence, including the adult forms

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See reader questions & answers on this topic! - Help others by sharing your knowledge
Adolescents have special problems in managing diabetes. These include a
variety of physiological problems related to puberty and rapid growth, social
problems related to growing up and the general social pressures of adolescent
life, and the psychological turmoil caused by the expectations of others. I'm
here today to talk about (hey, hold the eggs and tomatoes) expectations.

Actually, this all applies to adults as well, though the subtle points may
differ.

The most important thing to remember, for the adolescent, the parent, and the
health care provider, is


               All Blood Glucose Measurements Are Good.

               There Are No Bad Blood Glucose Readings.


If that doesn't sound right, then please take two steps. First, learn why it
is true. Then chant it like a mantra until you internalize it, so that you
never give off the slightest vibes to the contrary.

Why is it true?

There are two kinds of adolescents (to simplify life enormously): those who
rebel and those who want to please. Ironically, the rebellious are probably
easier to deal with in treating diabetes. "So my blood sugar is 350, so
what?" Bad? No, that's good: you know what's going on, and so does your
child. The point of blood glucose measurement is to respond -- not to be good
or bad -- and only with an accurate report can you and the patient respond.

   [Compulsory digression: 350 mg/dl = 20.0 mmol/L.]

Look what can happen to the eager-to-please child:

    Child: My blood sugar is 350.
    Adult: Oh, that's awful! You must try to be better!

       [next time:]

    Child: My blood sugar is ... um [to self: I must be good] 140 ...
    Adult: Oh, that's great!

In short order, the log book looks great but the HbA1c doesn't jibe.

This all happens with the best of intentions from all parties. The child is
trying to please, and is behaving in exactly the ways that elicit approval.
The adult is trying to care for the child's health in the most natural ways.
And the result is one that neither desires.

Thus the positive mantra to replace the half-negative one above:


               All Blood Glucose Measurements Are Good.

            Responding To Blood Glucose Readings Is Good.


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

An excellent article entitled "Insulin Therapy in the Last Decade: A
Pediatric Perspective", by Julio Santiago, MD, of the St. Louis Children's
Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis,
Missouri, appears in _Diabetes Care_, volume 16 supplement 3, December 1993,
pp. 143-154. The article discusses many aspects of treating pediatric
diabetes. Santiago spends several pages discussing how to establish realistic
and honest approaches to self-monitoring. I highly recommend the article.

User Contributions:

Raqiba Shihab
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May 10, 2012 @ 2:14 pm
Many thanks. My husband has Type 2 diabetes and we were a bit concerned about his blood sugar/glucose levels because he was experiencing symptoms of hyperglyceamia. We used a glucometer which displays the reading mg/dl so in my need to know what the difference
between and mg/dl and mmol/l is, i came across your article and was so pleased to aquire a lot more info regarding blood glucose, how to read and convert it.
Bhavani
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Aug 11, 2012 @ 9:09 am
It was really informative and useful for people who don't know conversion. Thanks to you
tamilarasan
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Oct 15, 2014 @ 1:01 am
The aqueous solution was prepared by mixing the calculated amount of KOH (5.61 g, 100 mmol) and Cobalt acetate (7.08 g, 40 mmol) and then stirred for 2 hours followed by refluxing for 4 hours as shown in Scheme 1. After filtration, the residue was washed with distilled water until the eluent shows pH 7. The residue was calcinated at 450C for 4 hours in dry nitrogen. Black powder was obtained with 85% yield

how much di water used for cobal oxide preparation sir please tell me sir

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Top Document: diabetes FAQ: treatment (part 3 of 5)
Previous Document: My diabetic father isn't taking care of himself. What can I do?
Next Document: So-and-so eats sugar! Isn't that poison for diabetics?

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