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diabetes FAQ: treatment (part 3 of 5)
Section - What's the bottom line on pycnogenol?

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Written by Laura Clift. (refs) point to "pycnogenol references" section.

All bioflavanoids are anti-oxidants (1,8,9) and may effect capillary
hyperpermeability (8,9), inflammations (3,8), and edemas (8). However, there
is no bioflavanoid deficiency condition, and they have "no accepted
preventive or therapeutic role in vascular purpura, hypertension,
degenerative vascular disease, rheumatic fever, arthritis, cancer, or any
other condition" (9). This was as of 1988; no mention of bioflavanoids is
made in the 1994 edition of this reference. Most pycnogenol studies and/or
claims come from the early 70's to mid 80's. Promising starts are never
followed up on. Most later studies seem negative (both pycnogenol and
bioflavanoids), especially about the oral route. With all but one study
performed in rodents, there is a very definite lack of information on how
this substance acts in humans and what possible side-effects it produces.

The sales pitch seems to be taken from the 1985 patent. Filing a medical
patent doesn't mean the substance is thoroughly studied and its applications
are determined. A patent is filed when preliminary studies look promising and
you try to come up with every possibly use for the compound, no matter how
far out in left field it may be. If you do not hold the patent for the
application, someone else could conceivably use your compound for that
application and owe you nothing or a very reduced royalty.

In short, patent claims have no medical significance.

User Contributions:

Raqiba Shihab
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May 10, 2012 @ 2:14 pm
Many thanks. My husband has Type 2 diabetes and we were a bit concerned about his blood sugar/glucose levels because he was experiencing symptoms of hyperglyceamia. We used a glucometer which displays the reading mg/dl so in my need to know what the difference
between and mg/dl and mmol/l is, i came across your article and was so pleased to aquire a lot more info regarding blood glucose, how to read and convert it.
Bhavani
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Aug 11, 2012 @ 9:09 am
It was really informative and useful for people who don't know conversion. Thanks to you

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Top Document: diabetes FAQ: treatment (part 3 of 5)
Previous Document: How reliable is the literature cited by the pycnogenol ads?
Next Document: Pycnogenol references

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