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diabetes FAQ: general (part 1 of 5)
Section - What is c-peptide? What do c-peptide levels mean?

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Thanks to Andrew Torres <andym(AT)ku.edu> for this section.

C-peptide blood levels can indicate whether or not a person is producing
insulin and roughly how much.

Insulin is initially synthesized in the form of proinsulin.  In this form the
alpha and beta chains of active insulin are linked by a third polypeptide
chain called the connecting peptide, or c-peptide, for short. Because both
insulin and c-peptide molecules are secreted, for every molecule of insulin
in the blood, there is one of c-peptide. Therefore, levels of c-peptide in
the blood can be measured and used as an indicator of insulin production in
those cases where exogenous insulin (from injection) is present and mixed
with endogenous insulin (that produced by the body) a situation that would
make meaningless a measurement of insulin itself. The c-peptide test can also
be used to help assess if high blood glucose is due to reduced insulin
production or to reduced glucose intake by the cells.

There is little or no c-peptide in blood of type 1 diabetics, and c-peptide
levels in type 2 diabetics can be reduced or normal. The concentrations of
c-peptide in non-diabetics are on the order of 0.5-3.0 ng/ml.

User Contributions:

Raqiba Shihab
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May 10, 2012 @ 2:14 pm
Many thanks. My husband has Type 2 diabetes and we were a bit concerned about his blood sugar/glucose levels because he was experiencing symptoms of hyperglyceamia. We used a glucometer which displays the reading mg/dl so in my need to know what the difference
between and mg/dl and mmol/l is, i came across your article and was so pleased to aquire a lot more info regarding blood glucose, how to read and convert it.
Bhavani
Report this comment as inappropriate
Aug 11, 2012 @ 9:09 am
It was really informative and useful for people who don't know conversion. Thanks to you

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Top Document: diabetes FAQ: general (part 1 of 5)
Previous Document: What are mg/dl and mmol/l? How to convert? Glucose? Cholesterol?
Next Document: What's type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes?

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Last Update March 27 2014 @ 02:11 PM