The protection of a diving wetsuit

By Jakob Jelling

Wetsuits are meant to keep divers warm by giving them thermal protection. There are some important guidelines which a diver should learn regarding the wetsuit he might acquire and use. First of all, it is important to know that they are usually made from neoprene; most of the times open cell neoprene. Besides, when wetsuits have a coating added to the neoprene they are easier to be worn and taken off.

The practice of free diving and scuba diving imply the use of different kinds of wetsuits. While a 5 mm thick wetsuit would be ideal for keeping warm a free diver, a scuba diver would need a 7 mm thick wetsuit to achieve the same results. Besides, while most free diving wetsuits don't have a zipper, most scuba diving wetsuits do come with them.

If you are looking for an open cell neoprene wetsuit, it is important that you have into account the fact that they can be easily damaged. If, for example, you are going to use jewelry under your open cell neoprene wetsuit, this could easily damage it and open it, so you should be very careful with it or try to find another kind of wetsuit instead of it. If you have long finger nails you should be careful as well since you could damage it while putting it on or taking it off.

It is also important to have in mind that free diving wetsuits should fit the diver in order to work well and give him the proper thermal protection. If a free diving wetsuit is loose or too tight it would not give the protection it should and it could even become a problem since it could be an obstacle to the diver's movements.

There also are recommendations on how to maintain and store your wetsuit. In order to store it properly while you are not using it, you should hang your wetsuit up avoiding folding it since that could damage it. Besides this, you should make sure to wash the suit after using it and make sure to wash all salty water off from it.

Jakob Jelling is the founder of Please visit his website to discover the world of diving!


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