41. Behavior


See also 28. ATTITUDES ; 279. MOODS ; 334. PSYCHOLOGY .

aberrance, aberrancy
the condition or state of being deviant or aberrant.
abnormalism
1. having a tendency towards, or being in a state of abnormality.
2. something that is abnormal.
abnormalist
a person who is characterized as being in some way abnormal.
adventurism
impulsive, rash, or irresponsible actions or attitudes, especially in the sphere of public life. — adventurist, n . — adventuristic, adj.
alarmism
the attitudes and behavior of one who exaggerates dangers or always expects disaster. — alarmist , n .
alogy
Obsolete, illogicality, unreasonableness. — alogic, alogical, adj.
amazonism
the taking on of masculine habits and occupations by women.
Arcadianism
the dress and conduct suitable to a pastoral existence, usually with reference to the idealized description of pastoral life in literature. — Arcadian, n., adj.
arrivism
1. the state of having recently achieved wealth or position, especially by unscrupulous or unethical means.
2. behavior typical of arrivism. — arriviste, n., adj.
asceticism
a severe self-deprivation for ethical, religious, or intellectual ends. — ascetic, n., adj.
atrabilarian
1. a sad and gloomy individual.
2. an irritable and bad-tempered person. — atrabilious, adj.
attitudinarianism
the practice of striking poses, either to mask or to express personal feelings. — attitudinarian, n.
attorneyism
the characteristics attributed to attorneys; slyness; unscrupulousness.
automatism
an automatic or involuntary action. — automatist, n.
autophoby
Rare. an abnormal fear of being egotistical, of referring to oneself.
babuism, babooism
Derogatory. the practices of Hindus who had only a slight English education. From bābū, a Hindi title equivalent to Sir or Mr.
Barnumism
showmanship or any activity taking advantage of people’s credulity or desire for sensational entertainment, as practiced by P.T. Barnum (1810-91).
bashawism
the characteristics of a bashaw, especially tyranny and imperiousness.
beatnikism
attitudes or behavior typical of a beatnik or one who has rejected conventions of society.
bestiality
a debased brutality, the opposite of humane activity: “I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial.” (Othello). See also 364. SEX .
bizarrerie
strangeness or grotesqueness, especially strange or unconventional behavior.
blackguardism
behavior typical of a blackguard, characterized by use of obscene language and by roguish actions. — blackguardery, n. blackguardly, adj.
bohemianism
the practice of individualistic, unconventional, and relaxed conduct, of ten in an artistic context, expressing disregard for or opposition to ordinary conventions. — bohemian, n., adj.
boobyism
conduct characteristic of a stupid person or clown. — boobyish, adj.
braggartism
a braggart’s usual activity; bragging. — braggartist, braggart, n.
brutalitarianism
the practice of advocating or engaging in brutality. — brutalitarian, adj.
brutism
the set of attributes that characterize a brute. — brutish, adj.
bullyism
the actions of a bully.
careerism
the characteristics associated with one who advances his career even at the expense of his pride and dignity. — careerist, n.
ceremonialism
an addiction to ceremonies or ritualism, especially in social and other nonreligious contexts. — ceremonialist, n.
characterology
the study of character, especially its development and its variations. — characterologist, n. characterologic, characterological, adj.
charlatanism
the quality of having characteristics of a fraud. — charlatanic, adj.
consuetude
a habit or custom; usual behavior.
coxcombry
foolish conceit or vanity; behavior typical of a coxcomb.
daredevilism
reckless or foolhardy behavior. Also called daredeviltry . — daredevil, n.
debacchation
Obsolete, raving or maniacal behavior, as that of a bacchanal.
decorum
proper behavior; action that is seemly and in good taste. — decorous, adj.
die-hardism
the attitudes or behavior of one who stubbornly holds on to something, as an outdated view, untenable position, etc. — die-hard, n., adj.
dilettantism
an admiration of or interest in the arts, often used pejoratively to designate a shallow, undisciplined, or frivolous attraction. — dilettante, n., adj. dilettantish, adj.
donkeyism
1. an action characterized as being donkeylike; foolishness.
2. the characteristic of being like a donkey. — donkeyish, adj.
do-nothingism
idleness or indolence as a habit or regular practice.
dowdyism
the habit of being shabbily dressed. — dowdyish, adj.
dramaticism
the habit of performing actions in a histrionic manner.
ergoism
a pedantic adherence to logically constructed rules.
erraticism
an action or behavior that deviates from the norm; unpredictability in behavior.
exhibitionism
1. a deliberately conspicuous or exaggerated mode of behavior, intended to gain attention.
2. the abnormal practice of indecent exposure. — exhibitionist, n. exhibitionistic, adj.
faineance, faineancy
laziness; the state of being idle. — faineant, adj.
fairyism
the quality of being a fairy or having fairylike characteristics.
fanfaronade
swaggering boastfulness; vainglorious speech or behavior. — fanfaron, n.
faustianism
spiritual or intellectual dissatisfaction combined with a desire for power or material advantage. After Johann Faust (c.1480-c.1538), German scholar portrayed by Marlowe and Goethe. — faustian, adj.
fiendism
Rare. evil attitudes and actions.
flunkyism, flunkeyism
1. the quality or state of being a servant or toady.
2. behavior typical of flunkyism. — flunky, flunkey, n.
formularism
the condition of adhering solely to set formulas. — formularistic, adj.
fossilism
behavior typical of an earlier time; old-fashioned or stuffy attitudes; fogyism.
fraternalism
the condition of having brotherly qualities. — fraternalist, n. fraternalistic, adj.
functionarism
the administrative duties of officials. — functionary, n., adj.
gangsterism
the habit of using organized violence to achieve one’s ends. — gangster, n.
gasconism
boastful or bragging behavior. Also gasconadc .
gelastic
1. inclined to laughter.
2. laugh-provoking in conduct or speech.
gnathonism
the extremely obsequious behavior of a sycophant. — gnathonic, adj.
gourmandism, gormandism
1. a strong penchant for good food; gourmetism; epicurism.
2. gluttony. — gourmand, gormand, n., adj.
grandeeism
attitudes and actions modeled on the grandees, Iberian nobles of the highest rank.
gypsyism, gipsyism
the activities and style of living attributed to gypsies. — gypsy, gipsy, n. gypsyish, gipsyish, adj.
harlequinade
a performance involving Harlequin or other characters of the Commedia dell’Arte; hence, buffoonery or clownish behavior. Also harlequinery.
hermitism
the practice of retiring from society and living in solitude, based upon a variety of motives, including religious. Also called hermitry, hermitship. hermitic, hermitical, adj.
histriconism
histrionicism.
histrionicism
a tendency to theatrical or exaggerated action. Also histriconism. histrionics, n. histrionic, adj.
hoboism
the state of being a hobo or vagrant.
holidayism
a dedication to taking holidays.
hooliganism
lawless behavior or conduct typical of a hooligan.
horsyism, horseyism
looking or acting in some way like a horse. — horsy, horsey, adj. horsily, adv.
Hottentotism
any behavior attributed to the Hottentots, in particular, a kind of stammering or stuttering.
hoydenism
ill-bred, boisterous, or tomboyish behavior in a woman. — hoyden, n. , — hoydenish, adj.
humbuggery
1. pretentious behavior or attitudes.
2. imposing or deceptive behavior. — humbug, humbugger, n.
humoralism, humouralism
an obsolete physiological explanation of health, disease, and behavior, asserting that the relative proportions of four elemental bodily fluids or humors (blood-sanguinity, phlegm-sluggishness, black bile-melancholy, and yellow bile-choler) determined a person’s physical and mental constitution. — humoral, humoural, adj.
hyphenism
division of patriotic loyalties, ascribed by some to foreign-born citizens in the United States.
idiocrasy
an idiosyncrasy or personal mannerism or peculiarity.
idiosyncrasy
a mannerism, action, or form of behavior peculiar to one person or group. — idiosyncratic, idiosyncratical, adj.
impudicity
lack of shame or modesty.
indecorum
1. indecorous, improper, or unseemly behavior.
2. an indecorous thing or action.
Indianism
the customs or traditions of Indians, especially American Indians. — Indianist, n.
insurrectionism
the quality of revolting against established authority. — insurrectionist, n., adj. insurrectionary, adj.
irascibility
a tendency to irritability and sudden fits of anger. Also called irascibleness . — irascible, adj.
Johnsonianism
the quality of having traits or characteristics like those of Samuel Johnson. — Johnsonian, n., adj.
juvenilism, juvenility
Often pejorative. a mode of action or thought characterized by apparent youthfulness. — juvenile, n. , adj.
landlordism
the actions and characteristics of a landlord. — landlordly, adj.
larkinism
frolicsomeness.
larrikinism
the state of being noisy, rowdy, or disorderly. — larrikin, adj., n.
libertinism
a tendency to unrestrained, often licentious or dissolute conduct. Also libertinage . — libertine, n., adj.
lionism
the pursuit or adulation of celebrities. — lionize, v.
litigiousness
1. an inclination to dispute or disagree with others, esp. through civil suits.
2. argumentativeness. — litigious, adj.
Londonism
the customs and characteristics of London and of those who reside there. — Londonish, adj.
macaronism, maccaronism
a tendency to foppishness. — macaroni, maccaroni, n.
maenadism
behavior characteristic of a maenad or bacchante; raging or wild behavior in a woman. — maenadic, adj.
maidism
1. the state or quality of being a maid, a young or unmarried woman.
2 . behavior or attitude typical of maidism.
mannerism
a style of action, bearing, thought, or speech peculiar to an individual or a special group. See also 23. ART . — mannerist , n. manneristic, adj.
martinetism
an emphasis on scrupulous attention to the details of methods and procedures in all areas of life. — martinet, n. martinetish, adj.
maudlinism
Rare.
1. a tendency in temperament to be mawkishly sentimental and tearfully emotional.
2. a degree of drunkenness characterized by mawkish emotionalism. — maudlin, adj.
melodramatics
behavior typical of that portrayed in a melodrama, i.e., characterized by extremes of emotion.
mercuriality
1. the state or quality of having a lively, fickle, volatile, or erratic attitude or charaeter.
2 . an instance of such behavior. — mercurial, adj.
milksopism
1. the state or quality of being a weak and ineffectual person.
2 . behavior or attitudes typical of a such a person.
mimicism
an intense (and sometimes injurious) tendency to mimicry.
mountebankism
boastful and pretentious behavior; quackery or any actions typical of a mountebank. Also mountebankery .
muckerism
behavior characteristic of a boorish person.
mutualism
the principle or practice of mutual dependence as the condition of individual and social welfare. — mutualist, n.
namby-pambyism
weak or insipid behavior or attitude. — namby-pamby, n., adj.
Negroism
a quality or trait distinctive of Negroes.
ninnyism
conduct characteristic of a ninny, or silly fool. — ninnyish, adj.
nomadism
a rootless, nondomestic, and roving lifestyle. — nomadic, adj.
nudism
the practice of going nude. — nudist, n., adj.
Occidentalism
the characteristics and customs of people situated in western regions, especially the Western Hemisphere, as western European countries and the United States. — Occidentalist, n.
ogreism
the condition of resembling an ogre in actions and characteristics. — ogreish, adj.
opportunism
the conscious policy and practice of taking selfish advantage of circumstances, with little regard for principles. — opportunist, n. opportunistic, adj.
Orientalism
the habits, qualities, and customs of Oriental peoples. — Orientalist, Orientality, n.
parrotism
mindless imitation. Also called parrotry .
particularism
the adherence to an exclusive subject, interest, or topic. — particularist, n. particularistic, adj.
parvenuism
1. behavior or attitudes typical of one who has recently acquired wealth or social position.
2 . the state or quality of being a parvenu or upstart. — parvenu, n., adj.
patricianism
1 . the state of being a member of one of the original citizen families of ancient Rome.
2 . the state of being noble or high born. — patriciate, n.
plebeianism
the quality of having common manners, character, or style. — plebeian, n., adj.
pococurantism
a tendency to conduct expressing indifference, nonchalance, or lack of concern. — pococurante, pococurantist, n. pococurante, adj.
poltroonism
the characteristics associated with being a coward or wretch. Also called poltroonery . — poltroonish, adj.
polypragmatism
a penchant for meddlesomeness and officiousness. Also polypragmacy, polypragmaty . — polypragmatist, n. polypragmatic, adj.
pornerast
one whose conduct is unchaste, licentious, or lewd.
praxeology, praxiology
the study of human behavior and conduct. — praxeological, adj.
preciosity
excessive fastidiousness or over-refinement in language or behavior.
precipitancy
hasty or rash action, behavior, etc.; undue or ill-considered haste. — precipitant, adj.
priggism
the strict adherence to correctness of behavior. — prigger, n. priggish, adj.
profligacy
1 . dissolute or immoral behavior.
2. reckless and extravagant spending or behavior. — profligate , adj.
protagonism
the actions and qualities of a protagonist. — protagonist , n.
protervity
a tendency to peevish, petulant, or insolent conduct.
psychagogics, psychagogy
a method of affecting behavior by assisting in the choice of desirable life goals. — psychagogue , n.
puppyism
affected or impertinent behavior; conceit.
quixotism
a tendency to absurdly chivalric, visionary, or romantically impractical conduct. — quixotic, quixotical, adj.
rabulism
Rare. a tendency to railing and quibbling. — rabulistic, rabulous, adj.
reactionism
the condition of being reactionary or resistant to change. — reactionist , n., adj.
reporterism
the characteristics of a reporter.
reunionism
the qualities of a reunion or social gathering. — reunionist , n.
revolutionism
the state of being revolutionary. — revolutionary, revolutionist, n. revolutional, revolutionary, adj.
routinism
the excessive adherence to a routine. — routinist , n.
rowdyism
noisy, quarrelsome, or disorderly conduct or behavior. — rowdy , n., adj.
ruffianism
behavior typical or characteristic of a brutal and violent person. — ruffian , n.
Satanism
diabolical behavior. — Satanist , n.
savagism
the condition of having uncivilized or primitive qualities. — savagedom , n.
schoolboyism
the practices characteristic of a schoolboy. — schoolboyish , adj.
scoundrelism
the characteristics and behavior of a scoundrel. — scoundrelly , adj.
seclusionist
a person who seeks solitude or removes himself from the society of others; a recluse.
sensorialism
the quality of having sensation. — sensorial . adj.
seraphism
Archaic. an ecstatic devotion, especially religious.
sermonist
1 . a person who delivers sermons.
2 . a person who adopts a preaching attitude.
Shandyism
a tendency to whimsical conduct in accord with absurd theories from past ages. [Allusion to the actions of Walter, father of the hero in Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. ]
spasmodism
a tendency to conduct marked by outbursts of strong emotion. — spasmodist , n. — spasmodic, spasmodical, adj.
Sundayism
activity characteristic of the observance of Sunday as a holy day.
supermanism
the condition of having qualities or traits like those of a superman. — supermanly , adj.
sybaritism
a love of luxury. [Allusion to Sybaris, a Greek colony in Italy not-ed for its luxury.] — sybarite, n . — sybaritic , adj.
sycophantism
the practice of self-serving or servile flattery. Also called sycophancy . — sycophant , n. sycophantic , adj.
sympathism
the condition of having coinciding emotions in two or more people.
tantalism
Obsolete . a form of teasing or harassment in which a hope of some good or benefit is instilled in the victim, only to be repeatedly dashed and the reward shown to be unattainable.
tartufflsm
hypocrisy. [Allusion to Molière’s hypocritical hero, Tartuffe.] Also called tartuffery.
theatricalism
a tendency to actions marked by exaggerations in speech or behavior. Also called theatricism.
tidyism
the habit of extreme neatness.
Timonism
a personal despair leading to misanthropy. [Allusion to Shake-speare’s Timon of Athens. ]
toadyism
a fawning flattery, obsequiousness, or sycophancy. — toady , n. toadyish , adj,
tokenism
formal or superficial compliance with a law, requirement, convention, etc.
tomboyism
the conduct characteristic of a tomboy, a boyish girl. — tomboyish , adj.
Turcism, Turkism
Obsolete, the attitudes and actions of the Turks.
ultracrepidarianism
the habit of giving opinions and advice on matters outside of one’s knowledge or competence. — ultracrepidarian , n., adj.
vagabondism
1 . the tendency to wander from place to place without a settled home; nomadism.
2 . the life of a tramp; vagrancy. Also called vagabondage. vagabond , n., adj.
vandalism
the malicious destruction or defamation of public or private property. — vandal, vandalization, n. vandalish , adj.
vanguardism
the actions or thoughts of members of a vanguard, those at the forefront of a movement, fad, etc. — vanguardist , n.
Victorianism
the affection for or emulation of Victorian tastes or thoughts.
Vikingism
the actions characteristic of a Viking, i.e., savagery, rapaciousness, etc.
voyeurism
the compulsion to seek sexual gratification by secretively looking at sexual objects or acts; the actions of a Peeping Tom. — voyeur , n. voyeuristic , adj.
vulpinism
Rare. the state or quality of being foxlike, especially crafty or cunning. — vulpine , adj.
vulturism
behavior or character typical of a vulture, especially in the figurative sense of being rapacious. — vulturous , adj.
werewolfism
the quality of having the traits of a werewolf.
Yahooism
a penchant for rowdyism. [Allusion to Swift’s characters in Gulliver’s Travels. ]
yokelism
1 . the state or quality of being a yokel or country bumpkin.
2 . behavior, language, etc, typical of a yokel.
zanyism
the style of a zany or buffoon.
zealotism, zealotry
a tendency to undue or excessive zeal; fanaticism.
zelotypia
Obsolete.
1. abnormal zeal.
2 . morbid jealousy. — zelotypic , adj.

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