5. Agriculture


See also 319. PLANTS ; 377. SOIL .

agriculture
the art and science of farming. Also called tillage . — agriculturist, agriculturalist, n . — agricultural, adj.
agrogeology
the branch of geology concerned with the adaptability of land to agriculture, soil quality, etc. — agrogeologist, n .
agronomics
agronomy.
agronomy
the science of management in farming. Also spelled agronomics . — agronomist, n.
chreotechnics
Rare. useful arts, as agriculture, commerce, and manufacturing.
citriculture
the cultivation of citrus fruits, as lemons, oranges, etc. — citriculturist, n .
culturist
a cultivator or a person who grows things.
emblements
Law. the growing of crops and the profits reaped therefrom.
fallowist
Rare. a proponent of the practice of leaving fields fallow.
grangerism
the principles and adherence to the principles of the Grange. — granger, n.
horticulture
the practice and science of cultivating gardens, for the growth of flowers, fruits, or vegetables. — horticulturist, n . — horticultural, adj.
husbandry
1. Obsolete, domestic management, thrift, or frugality.
2. farming, especially the care of farm animals.
monoculture
the use of land for the cultivation of only one type of crop. — monocultural, adj.
orchardist
a person who tends or cultivates an orchard.
pastoralism
the herding or tending of cattle as a primary economic activity or occupation. Also called pasturage . — pastoralist, n. pastoral, adj.
pasturage
pastoralism.
pomiculture
the cultivation of fruit and fruit-trees.
tillage
agriculture.
transhumance
the seasonal migration of livestock and those who tend livestock between mountain and valley, as practiced in Switzerland. — transhumant, adj.

User Contributions:

Comment about this article, ask questions, or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA