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[rec.scouting.*] Scouting Around the World Pt. 2 (FAQ 8)

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Archive-name: scouting/worldwide/part2
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-Modified: 1999/2/06

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Subject: Scouting on the Air: Radio Amateur Scout Technical Info Date: 15 Feb 93 16:05:59 PST The information I have is that there are two International Scout Nets operating regularly - the European one on 14.290khz on Saturdays at 0930 GMT and the World net on Saturdays on 21.360khz at 1800 GMT. I received this via JOTA in 1988 (I have been organizing a JOTA station for the District for the last 8 years and have been an Amateur Radio for the last year). Date: 26 Apr 1995 SB SPCL ARL ARLX036 ARLX036 BSA Net/JOTA news Boy Scouts of America is establishing a new net called BSA Net, International. It will meet every Sunday at 2030 UTC on 14.290 MHz. KB8OCC will act as net control. Thanks to David Michelson, KB8OCC, for the preceding information.
Subject: Scouting on the Air: JOTA (World Jamboree On The Air) JOTA is an annual event in which Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts and Guides from all over the world speak to each other by means of Amateur Radio. Information, dates and time for JOTI and JOTA can be found at: http://www.scout.org As every year since 1993, a JOTI (Jamboree On The Internet) will be held as off-stage event during the JOTA. To participate, connect to the Internet Relay Chatter (IRC) by using the IRC client on your local host or by telnetting to <host name to be supplied>. There will be a channel named "Scouting" (I think) where JOTers will meet during that time. JOTA is a worldwide event. Units may operate for 48 hours, from Saturday 00.00 h until Sunday 24.00 h local time. Due to the world's time differences, this period is not the same for everyone. To determine the times at which you can most likely contact a certain part of the world, calculate a time difference and ask your amateur radio operator about the radio propagation prediction (a sort of weather forecast for radio waves). Any authorized frequency may be used to establish a contact. Just call "CQ JAMBOREE", or answer Scout stations who are calling to establish a contact. National radio regulations must be strictly observed (in most countries, a licensed amateur radio operator must be present and a logbook must be held). To find each other easily, listen on the agreed World Scout Frequencies listed below. Another hint to improve your success rate: in the weeks preceding the event, keep an eye on rec.Scouting for other stations and arrange meeting times and frequencies with them in advance. World Federation of Great Towers ================================ The World Federation of Great Towers (WFGT) is an organization in which large towers all over the world co-operate for special activities. It was founded in 1989 with the aim to stimulate communication and exchanges of all sort between the people of the world. The WFGT invites Scouts to take part in the JOTA from the top of their Towers. Amateur radio stations will be installed on the towers and professional communication facilities to contact the other towers will be made available also. The following towers are expected to take part: Centrepoint Tower in Sydney (Australia), Donauturm in Vienna (Austria), CN Tower in Toronto (Canada), Empire State Building in New York (USA), Tour Eiffel in Paris (France), Euromast in Rotterdam (Netherlands), Ostankino Tower in Moscow (Russia), Blackpool Tower in Blackpool (United Kingdom) and British Telecom Tower in London (United Kingdom). Some of these stations may use special call signs as well. It is usually planned to establish a television link between New York, Paris and Moscow at some time during the weekend. This will make it possible for the Scouts at those towers to have a forum discussion. Further details are not yet known, but can be obtained from the World Bureau's radio station HB9S during the JOTA.
Subject: Scouting on the Net during JOTA (World Jamboree On The Air) Information, dates and time for JOTI and JOTA can be found at: http://www.scout.org A. JAMBOREE ON THE IRC (JOTIRC or JOTI) IRC stands for Internet Relay Chat. IRC is devoted to just "type-talking" with other users around the world. You join what they call a channel (similar to AOL's rooms, if you're familiar) and type words which appear on the channel. Everyone on that channel receives your words and can respond. The software needed is basically a client. Clients can be obtained from many ftp sites. See Scott Yanoff's "Internet Services" list on alt.internet.services for public IRC clients, or find out if your own system has the client installed by typing the following from your UNIX prompt: irc /join #Scouting For more information on IRC, anonymous FTP to: ftp://cs.bu.edu/irc/support/* Jamboree on the Internet will be held on the same weekend as JOTA. JOTA and JOTI should be conducted together when possible. For questions on the Jamboree on the Internet send E-mail to:JOTI@world.scout.org or go to: http://www.scout.org
From: Allan Fineberg <fineber@pilot.njin.net> Subject: Scouting Esperanto Date: Mon, 24 Apr 95 16:49:46 EDT [Note: a more complete version of this FAQ is posted as separate file once a month on rec.Scouting and may be retrieved through anonymous FTP from ftp.ethz.ch:/rec.Scouting/faq ] What is Esperanto? Esperanto is the easy-to-learn language devised by Dr. L.L. Zamenhof, of Warsaw, Poland, at the end of the 19th Century. Zamenhof saw the need for the peoples of the world to be able to transcend the barriers of language. Esperanto is used as a second language for communication between language communities. Is Esperanto supposed to replace the national languages? No. It is a neutral bridge-language between people of different language communities. What is the connection between Scouting and Esperanto? In his book, "Scouting for Boys," Sir Robert Baden-Powell, Scouting's Founder, recommends the use of Esperanto as a "secret language" among Scouts. The first steps to create the Skolta Esperanto-Ligo (Scout Esperanto League) took place in 1918, after the appearance of Alexander William Thompson's booklet proposing such an organization. Since then, SEL has held its own international camp-outs, and participated in World Scout Jamborees. For the World Jamboree in August in the Netherlands, an international group of SEL activists is organizing an activity in which participants will learn the basics of Esperanto using a space-age learning tool, "Esperanto-Elektro." Why is Esperanto called a "neutral" language? It is neutral in the sense that it has no political, cultural or national/ethnic "baggage" that it carries with it. This cannot be said for the various national languages, each of which carries with it its won particular agenda, be it political, cultural, religious, commercial or otherwise. The only agenda Esperanto has is to serve as a bridge-language between all peoples. Who can give me information about Skolta Esperanto-Ligo? La Skolta Mondo, the official publication of SEL, appears four times a year. The editor of La Skolta Mondo (Scout World) is Anna Margareta Ritamaki. Her e-mail address is: A.RITAMAKI@sheffield.ac.uk until June. As of June 1st, her e-mail address will be: aritamaki@finabo.abo.fi By prior agreement with her, telefaxing is available. The General Secretary of SEL is Hector Campos Grez. His snail-mail address: Casilla 331, Curico, Region 7, Chile. Fax: +55-75-312137. How can I learn Esperanto? Get the SEL textbook "Jamborea Lingvo," by J.L. Hammer, illustrated by the noted Netherlands graphic artist Melle Hammer. It is available from: SEL, Postbus 433, NL-1500 EK Zaandam, the Netherlands. Cost: 6 Netherland Guilders + postage/handling This book is also available through many Esperanto book services, such as that of Esperanto League for North America (elna@netcom.com). In many countries, SEL runs special courses just for Scouts. Or, get an Esperanto textbook at a public library or bookstore. Find out if an Esperanto course is being offered in your area. Take the Free Esperanto Course that is available by e-mail. The Administrator of the FEC is Marko Rauhamaa. He can be contacted at: Marko.Rauhamaa@tekelec.com The same course is available by snail-mail, from several national Esperanto associations. A wealth of information about Esperanto is available at the follo> Transfer interrupted! Pagxoj (Esperanto Yellow Pages/in Esperanto) ftp://ftp.cs.chalmers.se/pu/users/martinw./fla-pa/flavaj pagxoj.html Yellow Pages (Esperanto Yellow Pages/in English) ftp.netcom.com/pub/el/elna/Yellow Pages What does Esperanto look like? Esperanto estas neutrala ponto-lingvo. D-ro Zamenhof kreis Esperanton por helpi al internacia, intergenta komunikado. Bela, facila, Esperanto estas la racia solvo al la monda lingvo-problemo. Scouting Terms..........Skoltisma Terminaro Scout Skolto Girl Guide/Scout Skoltino Cub Scout Lupido Scout Leader Skoltestro Camp Tendaro Be Prepared! Estu Preta! Thinking Day Interpensa Tago [Thanks to Anna Margareta Ritamaki, Editor of La Skolta Mondo, who provided much of the material upon this FAQ is based.]
Subject: World Scouting Census Figures One indication (certainly not the only indication) of the strength of a national Scouting organization might be the size of the per capita percentage. Per capita percentage, for this purpose, is the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM) membership numbers divided by the population of the country. As of June 1998 there are 150 countries with WOSM recognized National Scout Organizations. The countries that had population figures are listed below. Membership: The membership which is shown in these countries represents only the members (youth and adults) of the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM), which in most countries includes boys and girls. In some countries - mostly in Europe - the national organization is larger than indicated here because it includes girls who are members of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS). The only organization included in the numbers from the USA is the BSA, the GSUSA is not included in the numbers on this page since they are part of WAGGGS not WOSM. Sources: WOSM Membership figures from http://www.scout.org except for BSA figures which are from BSA National's publication ProSpeak as of 12/31/98 (WOSM numbers were about 1 million more). BSA numbers do not include Learning for Life which does not have WOSM members. Country population figures are from: U.S. Bureau of the Census, International Data Base and The World Factbook, 1997. Ranking Country Membership Country Pop.Per Capita 1 Indonesia 9,896,357 212,941,810 4.65% 2 Philippines 2,888,265 77,725,862 3.72% 3 Kiribati 1,798 83,976 2.14% 4 Thailand 1,050,365 60,037,366 1.75% 5 United States 4,583,569 270,311,758 1.70% (BSA Only) 6 Dominica 1,100 65,777 1.67% 7 Maldives 4,543 290,211 1.57% 8 Liechtenstein 496 31,717 1.56% 9 Ireland 51,903 3,619,480 1.43% 10 Luxembourg 5,853 425,017 1.38% 11 Barbados 3,041 259,025 1.17% 12 Fiji 9,205 802,611 1.15% 13 Grenada 1,052 96,217 1.09% 14 United Kingdom 630,954 58,970,119 1.07% 15 Denmark 53,258 5,333,617 1.00% 16 New Zealand 33,673 3,625,388 0.93% 17 Belgium 92,691 10,174,922 0.91% 18 Canada 272,070 30,675,398 0.89% 19 Gambia 11,056 1,291,858 0.86% 20 Brunei Darussalam 2,617 315,292 0.83% 21 Sweden 71,033 8,886,738 0.80% 22 Hong Kong (P.R.C.) 53,049 6,706,965 0.79% (July 1998 est.) 23 San Marino 193 24,894 0.78% 24 Finland 38,132 5,149,242 0.74% 25 Qatar 5,096 697,126 0.73% 26 Malta 2,772 379,563 0.73% 27 Belize 1,643 230,160 0.71% 28 Cyprus 5,013 748,982 0.67% 29 Australia 124,424 18,613,087 0.67% 30 Iceland 1,692 271,033 0.62% 31 Bangladesh 784,054 127,567,002 0.61% 32 Suriname 2,601 427,980 0.61% 33 Kenya 168,021 28,337,071 0.59% 34 Bahamas 1,644 279,833 0.59% 35 Korea, Republic of 263,796 46,416,796 0.57% 36 St. Vincent/Grenadine 676 119,818 0.56% 37 Trinidad & Tobago 6,210 1,116,595 0.56% 38 Portugal 52,208 9,927,556 0.53% 39 Swaziland 4,994 966,462 0.52% 40 Poland 187,022 38,606,922 0.48% 41 Malaysia 93,449 20,932,901 0.45% 42 Tunisia 40,920 9,380,404 0.44% 43 Switzerland 31,553 7,260,357 0.43% 44 Norway 18,956 4,419,955 0.43% 45 Comoros 2,200 545,528 0.40% 46 Oman 9,495 2,363,591 0.40% 47 Netherlands 61,196 15,731,112 0.39% 48 Israel 21,920 5,643,966 0.39% 49 Slovenia 7,301 1,971,739 0.37% 50 Czech Republic 35,610 10,286,470 0.35% 51 Saint Lucia 516 152,335 0.34% 52 Taiwan 72,927 21,908,135 0.33% 53 Pakistan 441,677 135,135,195 0.33% 54 Botswana 4,660 1,448,454 0.32% 55 Togo 15,759 4,905,827 0.32% 56 Jordan 14,238 4,434,978 0.32% 57 Gabon 3,835 1,207,844 0.32% 58 Kuwait 6,061 1,913,285 0.32% 59 Singapore 10,392 3,490,356 0.30% 60 Bahrain 1,820 616,342 0.30% 61 Uganda 65,152 22,167,195 0.29% 62 Saudi Arabia 54,994 20,785,955 0.26% 63 Panama 7,111 2,735,943 0.26% 64 Mauritius 2,998 1,168,256 0.26% 65 United Arab Emirates 5,824 2,303,088 0.25% 66 Lebanon 8,450 3,505,794 0.24% 67 Chile 35,180 14,787,781 0.24% 68 Spain 89,256 39,133,996 0.23% 69 Libyan Arab Jamahiriy 12,902 5,690,727 0.23% 70 Central African Repl. 7,000 3,375,771 0.21% 71 Mongolia 5,311 2,578,530 0.21% 72 Italy 115,449 56,782,748 0.20% 73 Austria 16,455 8,133,087 0.20% 74 France 117,531 58,804,944 0.20% 75 Japan 244,827 125,931,533 0.19% 76 Hungary 19,809 10,208,127 0.19% 77 Monaco 62 32,035 0.19% 78 Benin 11,587 6,100,799 0.19% 79 Macedonia 3,500 2,009,387 0.17% 80 Germany 133,942 82,079,454 0.16% 81 Greece 17,378 10,662,138 0.16% 82 India 1,591,083 984,003,683 0.16% 83 Costa Rica 5,688 3,604,642 0.16% 84 Jamaica 4,133 2,634,678 0.16% 85 Sierra Leone 7,963 5,080,004 0.16% 86 Haiti 9,859 6,780,501 0.15% 87 Sri Lanka 25,288 18,933,558 0.13% 88 Tanzania 40,809 30,608,769 0.13% 89 Congo 62,842 49,000,511 0.13% 90 Burundi 6,661 5,537,387 0.12% 91 Yugoslavia 12,080 10,526,135 0.11% 92 Egypt 74,598 66,050,004 0.11% 93 Nepal 24,889 23,698,421 0.11% 94 Argentina 35,633 36,265,463 0.10% 95 Burkina Faso 10,165 11,266,393 0.09% 96 Bolivia 6,859 7,826,352 0.09% 97 Liberia 2,418 2,771,901 0.09% 98 Uruguay 2,841 3,284,841 0.09% 99 Namibia 1,378 1,622,328 0.08% 100 Slovakia 4,510 5,392,982 0.08% 101 Croatia 3,865 4,671,584 0.08% 102 Honduras 4,319 5,861,955 0.07% 103 El Salvador 4,180 5,752,067 0.07% 104 Estonia 1,016 1,421,335 0.07% 105 Mauritania 1,779 2,511,473 0.07% 106 Rwanda 5,479 7,956,172 0.07% 107 Belarus 7,050 10,409,050 0.07% 108 Syria 11,073 16,673,282 0.07% 109 Madagascar 8,857 14,462,509 0.06% 110 Senegal 5,882 9,723,149 0.06% 111 Mexico 59,531 98,552,776 0.06% 112 Guatemala 7,247 12,007,580 0.06% 113 Armenia 2035 3,421,775 0.06% 114 Papua New Guinea 2,599 4,599,785 0.06% 115 Iraq 12,000 21,722,287 0.06% 116 Angola 6,000 10,864,512 0.06% 117 Colombia 20,973 38,580,949 0.05% 118 Venezuela 12,371 22,803,409 0.05% 119 Nicaragua 2,298 4,583,379 0.05% 120 South Africa 21,323 42,834,520 0.05% 121 Peru 12,276 26,111,110 0.05% 122 Guinea 3,470 7,477,110 0.05% 123 Ecuador 5,536 12,336,572 0.04% 124 Zimbabwe 4,817 11,044,147 0.04% 125 Cameroon 6,535 15,029,433 0.04% 126 Morocco 12,304 29,114,497 0.04% 127 Nigeria 46,701 110,532,242 0.04% 128 Côte-d,Ivoire 6,436 15,446,231 0.04% 129 Lithuania 1,500 3,600,158 0.04% 130 Guyana 294 707,954 0.04% 131 Sudan 13,550 33,550,552 0.04% 132 Dominican Republic 3,200 7,998,766 0.04% 133 Yemen 6,481 16,387,963 0.04% 134 Chad 2,850 7,359,512 0.04% 135 Moldova, Republic of 1,540 4,457,729 0.03% 136 Brazil 58,493 169,806,557 0.03% 137 Latvia 801 2,385,396 0.03% 1 Algeria 10,000 30,480,793 0.03% 2 Zambia 3031 9,460,736 0.03% 3 Paraguay 1,240 5,291,020 0.02% 4 Romania 4,930 22,395,848 0.02% 5 Georgia 1,063 5,108,527 0.02% 6 Tajikistan 1,100 6,020,095 0.02% 7 Lesotho 371 2,089,829 0.02% 8 Turkey 11,252 64,566,511 0.02% 9 Ghana 3,186 18,497,206 0.02% 10 Niger 1,230 9,671,848 0.01% NOTES: The figures represent total membership numbers compared to total population. The figures do not represent the total population of 'Scout age' youth in each country nor the populations within each organization broken down by age, since the information is not available to the author. This problem is compounded by the fact that different organizations, some within the same country, have different beginning and ending ages for their programs. The reader should take into account that Scouting is run differently in different countries. In the Philippines, for example, which shows the second highest level of "market penetration" the scouting program is run as an in-school program with paid scoutmasters. Compared to that of Hong Kong, for example, where there is an all-volunteer program without the support of the current government. End of rec.Scouting FAQ #8 **************************

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