Conexant/Rockwell modem HOWTO

Imran Ghory

ImranG@btinternet.com

2001-08-01

Revision History
Revision 1.32002-03-12Revised by: ig
Updated to deal with new HCF driver.
Revision 1.22002-02-21Revised by: ig
Updated to deal with new HSF driver and release date for HCF driver.
Revision 1.02001-09-09Revised by: ig
Added entries to the FAQ, corrected grammatical errors, and update a URL.
Revision 0.92001-08-01Revised by: ig
Initial release.

Table of Contents
1. Introduction
1.1. Purpose of the howto
1.2. About the howto
1.3. Feedback
1.4. License
1.5. Acknowledgments
1.6. Getting Help
2. Quick Start guide
2.1. Quick Starting with an HCF modem
3. Identifying your modem type
4. HCF chipset based modems
4.1. History
4.2. Miscellaneous information
5. HSF
5.1. History
5.2. Kernel 2.2.14 - 18
5.3. Kernel 2.4.*
5.4. Troubleshooting FAQ
A. License
.1. GNU Free Documentation License

1. Introduction


1.2. About the howto

This HOWTO originally started out as a website about installing Conexant HSF modems under linux, but after several months of being online the number of hits on the website was rapidly growing (100 hits/day at time of writing this HOWTO) and so were the number of requests for information about Rockwell/Conexant modems that were being posted to the linmodem mailing list, usenet and various web based forums. This lead me to decide that the information needed another distribution medium which would be more accessible to users. The result of this was this HOWTO which has expanded to include a far larger range of information then the original website had, in order to cover all the questions being asked on the internet.

At the same time as the increase in demand for information about Rockwell/Conexant modems under linux a number of non-english webpages appeared explaining how to setup the drivers in languages as diverse as Portuguese and Japanese, these webpages often lacked all the current information which was available making it harder for users to get their modems to work. I decided to release this HOWTO under the GNU Free Documentation License, so that native speakers of other language can translate this document into their own language and redistribute it freely, thus ensuring that all users get all the information regardless of what language they speak. If you're interested in making a translation of this HOWTO please contact me.

The HOWTO assumes a basic knowledge of Linux, you should be familiar with the basics of how to use a console/terminal, how to use common commands like less and be familiar with a text editor.When the howto needs you to type something in at the console, the console prompt will look like this: '[user@localhost]$ '

Some parts of the howto rely upon a greater knowledge of Linux, but those section will mainly apply if you have a non-standard Linux distribution.


1.3. Feedback

If you have any feedback on how I can improve this HOWTO or are interested in translating this HOWTO into another language please contact me via email at ImranG@btinternet.com(if you don't get a reply within a week resend the message to imran@bits.bris.ac.uk).

If you need some help in getting your modem to work, rather then contacting me for help directly see the Getting Help section as you are more likely to be able to get a faster answer from the places indicated then if you email me direct.


1.6. Getting Help

If after following this HOWTO you still can't get your modem to work and you haven't already done so, check the troubleshooting section at the end of this HOWTO as it covers the most common problems. If you are still stuck then there are three main places where you can get help,

Linmodem mailing list

The Linmodem mailing list is the main place on the internet for discussion of the use of Software modems under Linux. If someone else has had the same problem as you chances are that someone on the Linmodem mailing list knows about it. To join the mailing list send a blank email to discuss-subscribe@linmodems.org, the mailing lists homepage is at www.linmodems.org.

SoftModems IRC channel

If you want to talk to someone real time your best bet is the #SoftModems channel on the OpenProject's IRC network. See www.openprojects.org for details or connect to eu.opirc.nu on port 6667.

Newsgroups

The newsgroups comp.os.linux.hardware and comp.os.linux.setup often have people familiar with software modems. If you speak Italian the newsgroup it.comp.os.linux.iniziare has people familiar with Conexant/Rockwell neewsgroups.

Remember when asking for help to include your modems Device ID, Vendor ID and any error message you got.


2. Quick Start guide

This section tries to get you up and running as soon as possible, if you can follow the steps given in this section and they work for you, you can ignore the rest of this howto. This section is updated more often then the rest of the HOWTO so will contain the most up to date information.

First you need to find out if your modem is an HSF or HCF modem. You can find out from your modem by looking at it's Windows drivers or looking at the label on it's chipset, or alternatively you can download the >

Quick Starting with an HSF modem

[1]

  • Run the program hsfconfig and just follow the on-screen instructions and it should automatically detect your modem and install the driver. If you have any problems consult the documentation that comes with the driver.

  • You will now be able to setup your internet connection software, you may need to tell it that your modem can be found at /dev/modem. If your internet connection software can't access it you may need to change the permissions on it.

    [Technical note: If you have a modem with device ID 2005, then you will need to choose the option to manually configure it before it will work]

    If the above steps don't work for you or the above mentioned driver doesn't work with your system (for instance if you have an SMP machine) then read the rest of the howto which explains how to use the older driver in greater detail.


    2.1. Quick Starting with an HCF modem

    1. Download the driver from http://www.mbsi.ca/hcflinux/, the following instruction are for the Binary RPM driver which is the easiest to install, if you want to install it using another method consult the README file.

    2. Load up a terminal (or go to a console), change to the root user and enter the directory you downloaded the driver to and use the command "rpm -i" followed by the name of the driver. For instance if it is called hcflinmodem-0.9mbsibeta02030801-1.i586.rpm you would enter,

      [user@localhost]$ rpm -i hcflinmodem-0.9mbsibeta02030801-1.i586.rpm

    3. Run the program hcfconfig and just follow the on-screen instructions and it should automatically detect your modem and install the driver. If you have any problems consult the documentation that comes with the driver.

    You will now be able to setup your internet connection software, you may need to tell it that your modem can be found at /dev/modem. If your internet connection software can't access it you may need to change the permissions on it.

    [Technical note: If you have an older modem, i.e one with the Rockwell brand name rather then Conexant then you will not be able to use this driver at present. You will also not be able to use modems which use SmartDAA. See http://www.mbsi.ca/hcflinux/latest/BUGS.txt for updates.]


    3. Identifying your modem type

    The first task you will need to do is to identify whether your modem's chipset is HCF or HSF. Unfortunately the traditional way of doing this (by using /proc/pci, lspci or KDE's control center) won't work for us here due to errors in the pci.ids file which can cause a misidentification of the modem. There are three main ways which you can use to identify your modem's chipset:

    1. If you've got your modem working under Windows then you can identify your chipset by downloading and running Conexant's ListModem Application. When you run it, the program will give the information we want under "MODEM TYPE".

    2. If you've opened your computer up chances are that the modem's chipset will have either the letters "HSF" or "HCF" printed on it.

    3. You can identify your type of modem from it's device ID and vendor ID, the easiest way get this information is from the command lspci -n (or less /proc/pci on older Linux distributions) this command tells you all of the Vendor IDs and Devices IDs for all of the PCI cards in your machine. You will be able to identify your modems' IDs as it will have a vendor ID of either 14F1 (Conexant) or 127A (Rockwell). Ignore any information that the lspci command tells you about your modem being a HSF or HCF as it could be wrong.

      The information is often presented in the form VVVV:DDDD where VVVV is the vendor ID and DDDD is the device ID, for instance if it listed 127a:2005 it would mean the that the Vendor ID is 127a and device ID is 2005.

      If your modem is a HCF modem it will have one of the following Device IDs:

      1033 / 1034 / 1035 / 1036 / 10b3 / 10b4 / 10b5 / 10b6 / 1003 / 1004 / 1005 / 1023 / 1024 / 1025 / 1f10 / 1f11 / 1f14 / 1f15

      If your modem is a SmartHCF modem it will have one of the following Device IDs:

      1052 / 1053 / 1054 / 1055 / 1056 / 1057 / 1058 / 1059 / 1063 / 1064 / 1065 / 1066

      If your modem is a HSF modem it will have one of the following Device IDs:

      2013 / 2014 / 2015 / 2016 / 2003 / 2004 / 2005 / 2006 / 2f10 / 2f12 / 2f00

      If your modem is a SmartHSF modem it will have one of the following Device IDs:

      2043 / 2044 / 2045 / 2046 / 2053 / 2054 / 2055 / 2056

    If you have a HCF or SmartHCF modem goto to the HCF section, if you have a HSF or SmartHSF modem go the to the HSF section.


    4. HCF chipset based modems

    4.1. History

    Unfortunately at the present time there is no HCF modem driver for linux. Conexant have indicated in section 11 of their FAQ (http://www.conexant.com:80/cnxt/customer/md_faqs.htm) that they are currently developing one.

    Several people have reported that they have got a HCF modem (in particular chipsets with the device ID of 1025) to work under Linux by using the HSF driver, however little firm information is known about this. If you successfully manage to use an HCF modem under linux please contact me to tell me about it.

    One person has reported that if you get the "No Dialtone" error when trying to use a HSF driver with a HCF modem you can correct it by using the AT command "AT S7=45 S0=0 L1 V1 X4 &c1 E1 Q0".


    5. HSF

    5.1. History

    A HSF driver first appeared out of the blue in mid-2000 when Olitec released unto the world a binary only driver for their Olitec PCI modem for 2.2.14 kernel, it wasn't long before someone realized that the Olitec modem was based on the Rockwell/Conexant HSF Chipset. Inquiries to Olitec revealed that the driver should work with any HSF chipset as there was nothing in the driver that was specific to the Olitec modems. Many people tried to get the driver to work with non-Olitec modem unfortunately without success, however a few months later and after many hours of work by many people trying a variety of tricks to get the driver to work, several people managed to stumble across the solution. It was a simple one line change to file which solved the problem and the world was left with a working HSF driver, at the time it only worked on 2.2.14 Kernels and Olitec had refused to release the source code to let others try to get it to work with other kernels.

    A few months later Olitec released the driver for 2.2.16 and 2.2.17 kernels, this kept the HSF winmodem community satisfied until we came to the day when the 2.4 kernel was released. None of the previous drivers appeared to work with the 2.4 kernel and this caused problems for all those who wanted to upgrade and also for the large number of new users who were using 2.4.* kernel based distributions such as Mandrake 8 and RedHat 7.1. Not a word had been heard out of Olitec since the 2.4 kernel was released, but Conexant had announced that they intended to develop a Linux driver. After many months of waiting for a 2.4.* driver Marc Boucher decided to something about it and wrote a wrapper which allowed an old version of the driver to be used with 2.4.* kernels.

    That's where we are now, Marc's wrapper is still in experimental development stage but it works and many people are using it to connect to the internet under Linux.

    From the history you'll understand why the next section has to be split into two sections one for 2.2.14 - 2.2.18 kernels and one for 2.4.* kernels. If you don't know what kernel version you have you can find out by using the 'uname -r' command at the console window before proceeding to the appropriate section of this HOWTO.


    5.2. Kernel 2.2.14 - 18


    5.2.3. If you have a 2.2.14 kernel

    Installing a HSF driver on a 2.2.14 kernel

    1. Download the file HSF_V1.01.02_K2.2.14-5.0.tar, it can be obtained from Olitec's site or the mirror.

    2. Copy it to your home directory

    3. In a console window change to your home directory

      [user@localhost]$ cd ~

    4. Decompress the file

      [user@localhost]$ tar xzvf HSF_V1.01.02_K2.2.14-5.0.tar

    5. Enter into the drivers directory

      [user@localhost]$ cd pci_56k_v2

    6. Load up the lin_hsf.inf file in your favorite text editor, under the section [generic] you'll see a few of lines like "%HSFModem% = ModemX, PCI\VEN_127A&DEV_1025&SUBSYS_1025127A" under theses lines add your own %HSFModem% line which you made earlier.

    7. Switch to root

      [user@localhost]$ su

    8. Run the ins_all script to install the driver

      [user@localhost]$ ./ins_all

    You will now be able to access the internet by telling your dial-up software that your modem is located at /dev/modem.

    The ins_all will only temporarily load the modem driver and the modem driver will be removed when you reboot. So if you re boot you will need to run the ./ins_all program to reload the driver, if you reboot on a regular basis you may want to set the . /ins_all command to automatically run every time your computer loads up.


    5.2.4. If you have a 2.2.16 kernel

    Installing a HSF driver on a 2.2.16 kernel

    1. Download the file PCI_56K_V2_K2.2.16.tar.gz, it can be obtained from Olitec's site or the Mirror.

    2. Copy it to your home directory

    3. In a console window change to your home directory

      [user@localhost]$ cd ~

    4. Decompress the file

      [user@localhost]$ tar xzvf PCI_56K_V2_K2.2.16.tar.gz

    5. Enter into the drivers directory

      [user@localhost]$ cd pci_56k_v2_k2.2.16

    6. Load up the lin_hsf.inf file in your favorite text editor, under the section [generic] you'll see a few of lines like "%HSFModem% = ModemX, PCI\VEN_127A&DEV_1025&SUBSYS_1025127A" under theses lines add your own %HSFModem% line which you made earlier.

    7. Switch to root

      [user@localhost]$ su

    8. Run the ins_all script to install the driver

      [user@localhost]$ ./ins_all

    You will now be able to access the internet by telling your dial-up software that your modem is located at /dev/modem.

    The ins_all will only temporarily load the modem driver and the modem driver will be removed when you reboot. So if you reboot you will need to run the ./ins_all program to reload the driver, if you reboot on a regular basis you may want to set the ./ins_all command to automatically run every time your computer loads up.


    5.2.5. If you have a 2.2.17 or 2.2.18 kernel

    Installing a HSF driver on a 2.2.17 or 2.2.18 kernel

    1. Download the file PCI_56K_V2_K2.2.17.tar.gz , it can be obtained from Olitec's site or the Mirror.

    2. Copy it to your home directory

    3. In a console window change to your home directory

      [user@localhost]$ cd ~

    4. Decompress the file

      [user@localhost]$ tar xzvf PCI_56K_V2_K2.2.17.tar.gz

    5. Enter into the drivers directory

      [user@localhost]$ cd pci_56k_v2_k2.2.17

    6. Load up the lin_hsf.inf file in your favorite text editor, under the section [generic] you'll see a few of lines like "%HSFModem% = ModemX, PCI\VEN_127A&DEV_1025&SUBSYS_1025127A" under theses lines add your own %HSFModem% line which you made earlier.

    7. Switch to root

      [user@localhost]$ su

    8. Run the ins_all script to install the driver

      [user@localhost]$ ./ins_all

    You will now be able to access the internet by telling your dial-up software that your modem is located at /dev/modem.

    The ins_all will only temporarily load the modem driver and the modem driver will be removed when you reboot. So if you reboot you will need to run the ./ins_all program to reload the driver, if you reboot on a regular basis you may want to set the ./ins_all command to automatically run every time your computer loads up.


    5.3. Kernel 2.4.*


    5.4. Troubleshooting FAQ

    5.4.1. When running ./ins_all I get a kernel mismatch error ?
    5.4.2. When I try to run ./ins_all I get the error "bash: ./ins_all No such file or directory."
    5.4.3. When installing the driver when it tries to load myserial.o I get a segmentation fault ?
    5.4.4. When trying to dial my ISP I get "No Carrier" error ?
    5.4.5. When running ./ins_alI get the error "No matching INF file is found for SoftK56 PCI device" ?
    5.4.6. On my Laptop the driver seemed to install fine but I can't access my modem on /dev/modem ?

    A. License

    .1. GNU Free Documentation License

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    .1.11. 10. FUTURE REVISIONS OF THIS LICENSE

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    .1.12. Addendum

    To use this License in a document you have written, include a copy of the License in the document and put the following copyright and license notices just after the title page:

    Copyright YEAR YOUR NAME.

    Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with the Invariant Sections being LIST THEIR TITLES, with the Front-Cover Texts being LIST, and with the Back-Cover Texts being LIST. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".

    If you have no Invariant Sections, write "with no Invariant Sections" instead of saying which ones are invariant. If you have no Front-Cover Texts, write "no Front-Cover Texts" instead of "Front-Cover Texts being LIST"; likewise for Back-Cover Texts.

    If your document contains nontrivial examples of program code, we recommend releasing these examples in parallel under your choice of free software license, such as the GNU General Public License, to permit their use in free software.

    Notes

    [1]

    1. Download the driver from http://www.mbsi.ca/hsflinux/, the following instruction are for the Binary RPM version which I recommend you use.

    2. Load up a terminal (or go to a console), change to the root user and enter the directory you downloaded the driver to and use the command "rpm -i" followed by the name of the driver. For instance if it is called hsflinmodem-4.06.06.02mbsibeta02012000-1.i586.rpm you would enter,

      [user@localhost]$ rpm -i hsflinmodem-4.06.06.02mbsibeta02012000-1.i586.rpm