WEEKLY REVIEW: CARIBBEAN GOVERNMENTS TAKE ANOTHER LOOK AT BLACK POWER

Created: 5/15/1970

OCR scan of the original document, errors are possible

The overall eiemnilens loritiis documenturn and

Secret

OF INTELLIGENCE

WEEKLY REVIE

Top Secret

Caribbean Governments Take Another Look at Black Power

the aftermath of thedisorders last month, aof the Caribbean governments are reassessing their publictoward Black Power and are adopting more stringent controls over its proponents.

Many of the Caribbean leaders are concerned that events similar to those in Trinidad could disrupt the peace and prosperity of their states if they pormit militants to agitate and preach racial violence. There is general agreement that Trinidad's Prime Minister Williams waited too long before trying to exercise control over Black Power elements whoso demonstrations and subsequent arrest led to the recent unrest. esult, theappear to be less reluctant to limit the activities of Black Power elements and more ready to risk oolitical attack fromin theofinstead to broadersentiment and preserving public safety. Some governments also seem to be more concerned about theloss of tourist revenues than therisk involved in confronting the militants.

In Barbados, the site for the second Regional Black Powerscheduledouly, Prime Minister Barrow haslegislation that would makeriminalto preach violence or racial hatred. He also intends to prevent nonnationals from participating in the country'sactivity, requiringclearance of all speakers and topics before permission toeeting is granted. Barrow isdetermined to maintain the position that militants should not be banned from Barbados butafter they get there. Last week Stokely Carmichael was detained at the airport, then permitted to stay overnight, but was not allowed to speakolitical rally in his honor.

Many other Caribbean leaders are also reluctant to give in to the demands of the radicals. Prime Minister Shearer has said that he will deal harshly and rapidly with any incipientdevelopment. Recently, some of the smaller islands have manifested their concern by banning travel of the more prominent Black Power spokesmen.

APPROUIO FOR RElEASt

TOP OCQRET UMDRrPEunm

Page 31 WEEKLYMay 70

Tho government of Trinidadintends toublic example of the leaders of last month's Black Power unrest and army mutiny. Nine civilians, including the head of one of the country's most important trade unions as well as the leader of the local Black Power movement, will be charged with sedition. According toofficials, some of the military defendants may receive death sentences for their part in the disorders.

APPROVEO FORRELEASE

TOP SKPPKT"

Original document.

Comment about this article or add new information about this topic:

CAPTCHA