CONVERSATION WITH GUATEMALAN ATTORNEY (W/ATTACHMENTS)

Created: 3/6/1953

OCR scan of the original document, errors are possible

ROUTING AND RECORD SHEET

Officer designation* ihould be used in tho "TO" column. Under eachine should be drawn ac'rott iheet and each comment numbered tocorreipond with the number in the "TO" column.olLttt thould initial (checknsufficient) befoic further routing Thi* Routine and Record Sheete returned te KeipM-y.

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FDR VIA

SUBJECT

OF CKSTEAL mSLLIQSKE

DEPUTT DIRECTOR (PLABS)

Conversation vlth Guatcaalfiii Attorney

With reference to your conversationaa present,

and witn rererence touueat that someone talkoung Guatanalan attorney, there is attached heretoonversationember of WED had with the attorney. The latter made no secret of hia true name during the conversation, and it is given In the memorandum.

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western Kemisphere Division

with Luis Beltranenauatemalan Attorney

ember of WH staff met with Luis Beltranenorominent young Guatemalan attorney. Boltranena atatod that he had cone to this country representing several associated enti-Co**in)ist groups, particularly the Associacion General da Agricultores. The expressed purpose of his trip is to ascertain whether the U. S. Government is aware of the extent of Communist dominance within the government of Guatemala and of the danger which it presents to hemisphere solidarity; also, if possible, to determine whethor the il, S. Government would oppose other Central American nations who might desire to aid the Guatemalan anti-Communists. Beltranena reviewed the build up of Guatemalan Communism in some detail and discussed the personalities and potential of various anti-Communist leaders with considerable objectivity. Ke stated that although prior to tho last presidential elections Genaral Miguel l'dlgoras Fuentea had asked him to bo prepared to assume the post of Foreign Minister, should Xdigoraa be elected, he now felt that of all tho presently prominent anti-Communist leaders Colonel Carlos Castillo Armas could attract the moat desirable elements andto form an effective government under which Guatemala might return to normal democratic and economic practices. Heomplete understanding that basic U. S. policy precludes intervention ln the domestic affairs of Guatemala and claimed to have no intention of soliciting U. S. material aid. Ha is interested, however, in an unofficial "green light" for the anti-Communists to seek their own solution with such Central American' aid as they may develop. He remarkedenevolent or at least non-hostllo attitude on the part of the J. S. and Mexico would be of great importance to elements in opposition to the Arbenx govomtent andhange in hexican Ambassadors, preferablytrong Catholic, would be very encouraging, .ic also Indicatedounger and leas hyper-cautious American Ambassador,hurch-^olng nan, but not an Irish Catholic would instill addod confidence.

Seltranena expressed himself as having been considerably reassured since his arrival hero that theovernment is familiar wilh tho current situation in Guatemala and does havo an interest in those elements which hope to restore normal democratic processes in that country.

Original document.

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