THE SOUTH AFRICAN NEGOTIATIONS MONITOR - VIOLENCE RAGES DESPITE IMPLEMENTATION

Created: 11/1/1991

OCR scan of the original document, errors are possible

THE SOUTH AFRICA NEGOTIATIONS MONITOR

Rages Despite Implementation of National Peace Accord

Toward Constitutional Talks

The landmark Naiional Peace Accordthis September by Pretoria, the ANC, Inkatha, and other political and laborhad little impact so far on the continuing black township violence, shaking public confidence in the accord. Observers increasingly see the NPA to be, atong-term solution to violence thai is driven by longstanding pou'tical and ethnic rivalries, revenge factors, andtensions. The government appears to be making strides to rein in renegade security elements contributing to the violence, but it may not be adequately consulting and briefing top ANC officials on these efforts.

Implementation Sluggish

Following moreonth of bureaucratic delays among the accord's main signatories, the first key structures of theNational Peace Commiueo and National Peacebeen put in place. However, the regional and local dispute resolution committees, which are the accord's principal mechanisms for dealing with violence at the grassroots level, arc apparently just being formed. Turn spent on achieving consensus on membership in these committees has slowed meir ciealion. even in the most volatile townships, reducing the impact of the accord to date.eople have died since the accord was signed. The accord's structures may not be fully established before next year, according to some observers, but

Pretoria and the ANC are eager to begin constitutional talks soon, and the government reportedly is considering many compromises widely deemed necessaryetuemcciLattle royal appears likely in light of the high stakes and longtime enmities involved, as well as continued blaek-on-black fighting.

President de Klerk and ANC President Mandela met recently to discussultiparty conference byovember, although the agenda is not yet fixed. Pretoria wants the conference to drawew, detailed political sysu^n; ANC leaders believe it should define principles, butonstituent assembly of nationally elected delegates should fill iniess report says Pretoria would view the ANC scheme more favorably if it agreesederally or regionally based system rathernitary state. Senior National Party officials alsoournalist recently that their controversial proposalotating presidency and multiparty executive

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Public Support Waning

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COS ATI!nke Is partroad

campaign to foster an intcnm government that will allowole in restructuring the country. The ANC says more mass actionswill occur if an interim government is not csublished^^m

result of the massive general strike last week led by thelly, the Congress of South African Tradetnaaanw^ believes Pretoria is more hkeryatislybtjck^ demandsxsccpobcymakunj dunng talksew coruutbrtion. Pretoria's stance on interimlreadyill coniidcralmostanylhing short of su the present constitution and resigning.)

smooth Sailing Unlikely Despite repoits of compromises, the talks process remains vulnerable to disruptions. The September peace accord signed by Pretoria, the ANC. and the Zulu Inkatha group hat not slowed (actional clashes that have resulted in the deaths of moreXX Macks in the pan yew, includingn the lastays, and political leaders on all sides have so far been reluctant to disassociate themselves completely from the fighting Inkatha denounced the recent unit, and may counter by anacling mete ANC supporten. Pretoria, which condemned theillegaliolation of the peace accord, will lose patience rapidly if COSnd ANC maw protests persist. Nonetheless,

The ANCbacked strike was risky, as many more lives could have beenkwtcavsidering the high level of tension in theuch bloodier strike would have left de Klerk in an einmcly lough positionis his while constituency, which places modi value on biw and order inure. Sbice the strike, de Klerk has made several tough statements about mass protests, some of which seemed aimed at encouraging employers to take strict actions against workers who participate hi future labor boycotts. Nonetheless, the strike, ironically, probably has worked lo promote the US goal of "leveling the playing field* between the Souch African Government and the black opposition. At the least, the ANC and COSATU will hjve more confidencefooaiiong sessiorui with Pretoriaesult of the flnke's

The thorniest issuesew South Africa are likely to become apparent soon after talks begin. Chief among ihem will be the appropriate locus of politicalthe national, regional, or localtl* best method of improving the economic staius of blacks. While others will provide input, Pretoria and the ANC will decide these issues, and theirwithout thefar apart. |

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